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Filters: Author is Hietala, H.  [Clear All Filters]
2019
Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Turner D. L., Jaynes A. N., Hietala H., Koskinen H. E. J., et al.
Title: Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt Response to Interacting Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections
Abstract: We study the response of the outer Van Allen radiation belt during an intense magnetic storm on 15–22 February 2014. Four interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at Earth, of which the three last ones were interacting. Using data from the Van Allen Probes, we report the first detailed investigation of electron fluxes from source (tens of kiloelectron volts) to core (megaelectron volts) energies and possible loss and acceleration mechanisms as a response to substructures (shock, sheath and ejecta, and regions of shock‐compressed ejecta) in multiple interacting ICMEs. After an initial enhancement induced by a shock compression of the magnetosphere, core fluxes strongly depleted and stayed low for 4 days. This sustained depletion can be related to a sequence of ICME substruc. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1927 - 1947 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026238 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026238
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Authors: Turner D. L., Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, et al.
Title: The Response of Earth's Electron Radiation Belts to Geomagnetic Storms: Statistics From the Van Allen Probes Era Including Effects From Different Storm Drivers
Abstract: A statistical study was conducted of Earth's radiation belt electron response to geomagnetic storms using NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Data for electrons with energies ranging from 30 keV to 6.3 MeV were included and examined as a function of L‐shell, energy, and epoch time during 110 storms with SYM‐H ≤−50 nT during September 2012 to September 2017 (inclusive). The radiation belt response revealed clear energy and L‐shell dependencies, with tens of keV electrons enhanced at all L‐shells (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6) in all storms during the storm commencement and main phase and then quickly decaying away during the early recovery phase, low hundreds of keV electrons enhanced at lower L‐shells (~3 ≤ L ≤ ~4) in upward of 90% of all storms and then decaying gradually during the rec. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026066 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026066
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2015
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: The effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons in Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: We use Van Allen Probes data to investigate the responses of 10s of keV to 2 MeV electrons throughout a broad range of the radiation belts (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6.0) during 52 geomagnetic storms from the most recent solar maximum. Electron storm-time responses are highly dependent on both electron energy and L-shell. 10s of keV electrons typically have peak fluxes in the inner belt or near-Earth plasma sheet and fill the inner magnetosphere during storm main phases. ~100 to ~600 keV electrons are enhanced in up to 87% of cases around L~3.7, and their peak flux location moves to lower L-shells during storm recovery phases. Relativistic electrons (≥~1 MeV) are nearly equally likely to produce enhancement, depletion, and no-change events in the outer belt. We also show that the L-shell of peak flu. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064747 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064747
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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