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Filters: Author is Hendry, Aaron T.  [Clear All Filters]
2015
Authors: Clilverd Mark A., Duthie Roger, Hardman Rachael, Hendry Aaron T., Rodger Craig J., et al.
Title: Electron precipitation from EMIC waves: a case study from 31 May 2013
Abstract: On 31 May 2013 several rising-tone electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves with intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods (IPDP) were observed in the magnetic local time afternoon and evening sectors during the onset of a moderate/large geomagnetic storm. The waves were sequentially observed in Finland, Antarctica, and western Canada. Co-incident electron precipitation by a network of ground-based Antarctic Arctic Radiation-belt Dynamic Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) and riometer instruments, as well as the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) electron telescopes, was also observed. At the same time POES detected 30-80 keV proton precipitation drifting westwards at locations that were consistent with the ground-based observations, i. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021090 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021090
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Authors: Rodger Craig J., Hendry Aaron T., Clilverd Mark A., Kletzing Craig A., Brundell James B., et al.
Title: High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size, and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident pr. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 9633 - 9641 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v42.2210.1002/2015GL066581 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015GL066581/full
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