Biblio

Found 4 results
Filters: Author is Xiong, Ying  [Clear All Filters]
2018
Authors: Xiong Ying, Xie Lun, Chen Lunjin, Ni Binbin, Fu Suiyan, et al.
Title: The Response of the Energy Content of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms
Abstract: Using the data from the Van Allen Probe‐A spacecraft, the variability of the total outer radiation belt (2.5300 keV) is investigated for the first time during 51 isolated storms spanning from October 2012 to May 2017. The statistical results show that the TRBEEC exhibits no‐change in 20% of the storms and gets enhanced during 80% of them. The sub‐relativistic electrons (300‐500 keV) and relativistic electrons (0.5‐2.0 MeV) equally contribute to the TRBEEC during the main phases, while in the recovery phases, the relativistic electrons contribute up to 80% of the TRBEEC. The results of the superposed epoch analysis of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices indicate that the TRBEEC enhancement events prefe. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025475 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025475
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2017
Authors: He Zhaoguo, Chen Lunjin, Zhu Hui, Xia Zhiyang, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Multiple-satellite observation of magnetic dip event during the substorm on 10 October, 2013
Abstract: We present a multiple-satellite observation of the magnetic dip event during the substorm on October 10, 2013. The observation illustrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the magnetic dip and gives a compelling evidence that ring current ions induce the magnetic dip by enhanced plasma beta. The dip moves with the energetic ions in a comparable drift velocity and affects the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. In addition, the magnetic dip provides a favorable condition for the EMIC wave generation based on the linear theory analysis. The calculated proton diffusion coefficients show that the observed EMIC wave can lead to the pitch angle scattering losses of the ring current ions, which in turn partially relax the magnetic dip in the observations. This study enr. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074869 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074869/full
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Authors: Xiong Ying, Chen Lunjin, Xie Lun, Fu Suiyan, Xia Zhiyang, et al.
Title: Relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distribution modulated by localized background magnetic field perturbation driven by hot ring current ions
Abstract: Dayside modulated relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distributions (PADs) from ∼200 keV to 2.6 MeV were observed by Van Allen Probe B at L = 5.3 on 15 November 2013. They were associated with localized magnetic dip driven by hot ring current ion (60–100 keV proton and 60–200 keV helium and oxygen) injections. We reproduce the electron's butterfly PADs at satellite's location using test particle simulation. The simulation results illustrate that a negative radial flux gradient contributes primarily to the formation of the modulated electron's butterfly PADs through inward transport due to the inductive electric field, while deceleration due to the inductive electric field and pitch angle change also makes in part contribution. We suggest that localized magnetic field pertur. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072558 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL072558/full
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2015
Authors: Xiong Ying, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, Fu Suiyan, Chen Lunjin, et al.
Title: Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms
Abstract: Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3–2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5–14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such “energy-dependent” responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examin. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 9513–9523 DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021440 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015JA021440/full
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