Biblio

Found 11 results
Filters: Author is Angelopoulos, Vassilis  [Clear All Filters]
2017
Authors: Yue Chao, Chen Lunjin, Bortnik Jacob, Ma Qianli, Thorne Richard M, et al.
Title: The characteristic response of whistler mode waves to interplanetary shocks
Abstract: Magnetospheric whistler mode waves play a key role in regulating the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. Recent satellite observations indicate a significant influence of interplanetary (IP) shocks on whistler mode wave power in the inner magnetosphere. In this study, we statistically investigate the response of whistler mode chorus and plasmaspheric hiss to IP shocks based on Van Allen Probes and THEMIS satellite observations. Immediately after the IP shock arrival, chorus wave power is usually intensified, often at post-midnight to pre-noon sector, while plasmaspheric hiss wave power predominantly decreases near the dayside but intensifies near the nightside. We conclude that chorus wave intensification outside the plasmasphere is probably associated with the suprathermal electron . . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024574 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024574/full
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Authors: Wang Chih-Ping, Thorne Richard, Liu Terry Z., Hartinger Michael D., Nagai Tsugunobu, et al.
Title: A multi-spacecraft event study of Pc5 ultra low frequency waves in the magnetosphere and their external drivers
Abstract: We investigate a quiet-time event of magnetospheric Pc5 ultra low frequency (ULF) waves and their likely external drivers using multiple spacecraft observations. Enhancements of electric and magnetic field perturbations in two narrow frequency bands, 1.5-2 mHz and 3.5-4 mHz, were observed over a large radial distance range from r ~5 to 11 RE. During the first half of this event, perturbations were mainly observed in the transverse components and only in the 3.5-4 mHz band. In comparison, enhancements were stronger during the second half in both transverse and compressional components and in both frequency bands. No indication of field line resonances was found for these magnetic field perturbations. Perturbations in these two bands were also observed in the magnetosheath, but not in the so. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023610 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023610/full
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2016
Authors: Li Jinxing, Bortnik Jacob, Thorne Richard M, Li Wen, Ma Qianli, et al.
Title: Ultrarelativistic electron butterfly distributions created by parallel acceleration due to magnetosonic waves
Abstract: The Van Allen Probe observations during the recovery phase of a large storm that occurred on 17 March 2015 showed that the ultrarelativistic electrons at the inner boundary of the outer radiation belt (L* = 2.6–3.7) exhibited butterfly pitch angle distributions, while the inner belt and the slot region also showed evidence of sub-MeV electron butterfly distributions. Strong magnetosonic waves were observed in the same regions and at the same time periods as these butterfly distributions. Moreover, when these magnetosonic waves extended to higher altitudes (L* = 4.1), the butterfly distributions also extended to the same region. Combining test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck diffusion simulations, we successfully reproduced the formation of the ultrarelativistic electron b. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 3212 - 3222 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022370 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022370
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2015
Authors: Zhou Xu-Zhi, Wang Zi-Han, Zong Qiu-Gang, Claudepierre Seth G., Mann Ian R., et al.
Title: Imprints of impulse-excited hydromagnetic waves on electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Ultralow frequency electromagnetic oscillations, interpreted as standing hydromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere, are a major energy source that accelerates electrons to relativistic energies in the Van Allen radiation belt. Electrons can rapidly gain energy from the waves when they resonate via a process called drift resonance, which is observationally characterized by energy-dependent phase differences between electron flux and electromagnetic oscillations. Such dependence has been recently observed and interpreted as spacecraft identifications of drift resonance electron acceleration. Here we show that in the initial wave cycles, the observed phase relationship differs from that characteristic of well-developed drift resonance. We further examine the differences and find that they are . . .
Date: 08/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6199 - 6204 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v42.1510.1002/2015GL064988 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v42.15http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064988
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Authors: Dai Lei, Wang Chi, Duan Suping, He Zhaohai, Wygant John R., et al.
Title: Near-Earth Injection of MeV Electrons associated with Intense Dipolarization Electric Fields: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Substorms generally inject 10s-100s keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the pre-midnight sector at L∼5.5, Van Allen Probes (RBSP)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50mV/m) over ∼40s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the in. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064955 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064955
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Authors: Nakamura Satoko, Omura Yoshiharu, Shoji Masafumi, Nosé Masahito, Summers Danny, et al.
Title: Sub-packet structures in EMIC rising tone emissions observed by the THEMIS probes
Abstract: We report sub-packet structures found in electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions observed by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probles. We investigate three typical cases in detail. The first case shows a continuous single rising tone with obvious four sub-packets, and the second case is characterized by a patchy emission with multiple sub-packets triggered in a broadband frequency. The third case looks like a smooth rising tone without any obvious sub-packet in the FFT spectrum, while its amplitude contains small peaks with increasing frequencies. The degree of polarization of each sub-packet is generally higher than 0.8 with a left-handed polarization, and the wave direction of the sub-packets is typically field-aligned. W. . .
Date: 08/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020764 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020764
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2014
Authors: Ma Qianli, Li Wen, Chen Lunjin, Thorne Richard M, and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Magnetosonic wave excitation by ion ring distributions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Combining Time History of Events and Macroscale Interaction during Substorms (THEMIS) wave and particle observations and a quantitative calculation of linear wave growth rate, we demonstrate that magnetosonic (MS) waves can be locally excited by ion ring distributions in the Earth's magnetosphere when the ion ring energy is comparable to the local Alfven energy. MS waves in association with ion ring distributions were observed by THEMIS A on 24 November 2010 in the afternoon sector, both outside the plasmapause where the wave spectrum varied with fLHR and inside the plasmapause where the wave frequency band remained nearly constant. Our plasma instability analysis in three different regions shows that higher and narrow frequency band MS waves are excited locally outside the plasmapause, an. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 844 - 852 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019591 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019591
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Authors: Lee Justin H., and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Observations and modeling of EMIC wave properties in the presence of multiple ion species as function of magnetic local time
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation and propagation in Earth's magnetosphere depend on readily measurable hot (a few to tens of keV) plasma sheet ions, elusive plasmaspheric or ionospheric cold (sub-eV to a few eV) ions, and partially heated warm ions (tens to hundreds of eV). Previous work has assumed all low-energy ions are cold and not considered possible effects of warm ions. Using measurements by multiple Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we analyze four typical EMIC wave events in the four magnetic local time sectors and consider the properties of both cold and warm ions supplied from previous statistical studies to interpret the wave observations using linear theory. As expected, we find that dusk EMIC waves grow due to . . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020469 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020469
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Authors: Wang Chih-Ping, Xing Xiaoyan, Nakamura T. K. M., Lyons Larry R., and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Source and structure of bursty hot electron enhancements in the tail magnetosheath: Simultaneous two-probe observation by ARTEMIS
Abstract: Bursty enhancements of hot electrons (≳0.5 keV) with duration of minutes sometimes occur in the tail magnetosheath. In this study we used the unique simultaneous measurements from the two Acceleration Reconnection Turbulence and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun probes to investigate the likely sources, spatial structures, and responsible processes for these hot electron enhancements. The enhancements can be seen at any distance across the magnetosheath, but those closer to the magnetopause are more often accompanied by magnetosheath density and flow magnitudes changing to more magnetosphere-like values. From simultaneous measurements with the two probes being on either side of magnetopause or both in the magnetosheath, it is evident that these hot electrons come from . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020603 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020603
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Authors: Taubenschuss Ulrich, Khotyaintsev Yuri V., ík Ondrej, Vaivads Andris, Cully Christopher M., et al.
Title: Wave normal angles of whistler-mode chorus rising and falling tones
Abstract: We present a study of wave normal angles (θk) of whistler mode chorus emission as observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) during the year 2008. The three inner THEMIS satellites THA, THD, and THE usually orbit Earth close to the dipole magnetic equator (±20°), covering a large range of L shells from the plasmasphere out to the magnetopause. Waveform measurements of electric and magnetic fields enable a detailed polarization analysis of chorus below 4 kHz. When displayed in a frequency-θk histogram, four characteristic regions of occurrence are evident. They are separated by gaps at f/fc,e≈0.5 (f is the chorus frequency, fc,e is the local electron cyclotron frequency) and at θk∼40°. Below θk∼40°, the average value for θk is pre. . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020575 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020575
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2012
Authors: Turner Drew L, Shprits Yuri, Hartinger Michael, and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Explaining sudden losses of outer radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts were first discovered in 1958 by the Explorer series of spacecraft1. The dynamic outer belt consists primarily of relativistic electrons trapped by the Earth’s magnetic field. Magnetospheric processes driven by the solar wind2 cause the electron flux in this belt to fluctuate substantially over timescales ranging from minutes to years3. The most dramatic of these events are known as flux ’dropouts’ and often occur during geomagnetic storms. During such an event the electron flux can drop by several orders of magnitude in just a few hours4, 5 and remain low even after a storm has abated. Various solar wind phenomena, including coronal mass ejections and co-rotating interaction regions6, can drive storm activity, but several outstanding questions remain co. . .
Date: 01/2012 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Pages: 208–212 DOI: 10.1038/nphys2185 Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2185
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