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Found 49 results
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2019
Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Yue C., Thorne R M, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Ion Heating by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves and Magnetosonic Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and magnetosonic waves are commonly observed in the Earth's magnetosphere associated with enhanced ring current activity. Using wave and ion measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we identify clear correlations between the hydrogen‐ and helium‐band EMIC waves with the enhancement of trapped helium and oxygen ion fluxes, respectively. We calculate the diffusion coefficients of different ion species using quasi‐linear theory to understand the effects of resonant scattering by EMIC waves. Our calculations indicate that EMIC waves can cause pitch angle scattering loss of several keV to hundreds of keV ions, and heating of tens of eV to several keV helium and oxygen ions by hydrogen‐ and helium‐band EMIC waves, respectively. Moreover, we fou. . .
Date: 06/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6258 - 6267 DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083513 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL083513
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Authors: Zhang X.‐J., Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Angelopoulos V, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Nonlinear Electron Interaction With Intense Chorus Waves: Statistics of Occurrence Rates
Abstract: A comprehensive statistical analysis on 8 years of lower‐band chorus wave packets measured by the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS spacecraft is performed to examine whether, when, and where these waves are above the theoretical threshold for nonlinear resonant wave‐particle interaction. We find that ∼5–30% of all chorus waves interact nonlinearly with ∼30‐ to 300‐keV electrons possessing equatorial pitch angles of >40° in the outer radiation belt, especially during disturbed (AE>500 nT) periods with energetic particles associated with injections from the plasma sheet. Such considerable occurrence rates of nonlinear interactions imply that the evolution of energetic electron fluxes should be dominated by nonlinear effects, rather than by quasi‐linear diffusion as commonly assum. . .
Date: 06/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083833 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL083833
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2018
Authors: Zhang X.-J., Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Angelopoulos V, and Thorne R M
Title: Electron flux enhancements at L  = 4.2 observed by Global Positioning System satellites: Relationship with solar wind and geomagnetic activity
Abstract: Determining solar wind and geomagnetic activity parameters most favorable to strong electron flux enhancements is an important step towards forecasting radiation belt dynamics. Using electron flux measurements from Global Positioning System satellites at L = 4.2 in 2009‐2016, we seek statistical relationships between flux enhancements at different energies and solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn, AE, and Kp, from hundreds of events inside and outside the plasmasphere. Most ⩾1 MeV electron flux enhancements occur during non‐storm (or weak storm) times. Flux enhancements of 4 MeV electrons outside the plasmasphere occur during periods of low Pdyn and high AE. We perform superposed epoch analyses of GPS electron fluxes, along with solar wind and geomagnetic indices, 40 keV electron flu. . .
Date: 06/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025497 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2018JA025497http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1029/2018JA025497/fullpdfhttps://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1029%2F2018JA025497
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Authors: Mourenas D., Zhang X.-J., Artemyev A. V., Angelopoulos V, Thorne R M, et al.
Title: Electron nonlinear resonant interaction with short and intense parallel chorus wave-packets
Abstract: One of the major drivers of radiation belt dynamics, electron resonant interaction with whistler‐mode chorus waves, is traditionally described using the quasi‐linear diffusion approximation. Such a description satisfactorily explains many observed phenomena, but its applicability can be justified only for sufficiently low intensity, long duration waves. Recent spacecraft observations of a large number of very intense lower band chorus waves (with magnetic field amplitudes sometimes reaching ∼1% of the background) therefore challenge this traditional description, and call for an alternative approach when addressing the global, long‐term effects of the nonlinear interaction of these waves with radiation belt electrons. In this paper, we first use observations from the Van Allen Probe. . .
Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025417 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025417
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Authors: Vainchtein D., Zhang X.-J., Artemyev A. V., Mourenas D., Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: Evolution of electron distribution driven by nonlinear resonances with intense field-aligned chorus waves
Abstract: Resonant electron interaction with whistler‐mode chorus waves is recognized as one of the main drivers of radiation belt dynamics. For moderate wave intensity, this interaction is well described by quasi‐linear theory. However, recent statistics of parallel propagating chorus waves have demonstrated that 5 − 20% of the observed waves are sufficiently intense to interact nonlinearly with electrons. Such interactions include phase trapping and phase bunching (nonlinear scattering) effects not described by quasi‐linear diffusion. For sufficiently long (large) wave‐packets, these nonlinear effects can result in very rapid electron acceleration and scattering. In this paper we introduce a method to include trapping and nonlinear scattering into the kinetic equation describing the . . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025654 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025654
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Chu X., et al.
Title: Quantitative Evaluation of Radial Diffusion and Local Acceleration Processes During GEM Challenge Events
Abstract: We simulate the radiation belt electron flux enhancements during selected Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) challenge events to quantitatively compare the major processes involved in relativistic electron acceleration under different conditions. Van Allen Probes observed significant electron flux enhancement during both the storm time of 17–18 March 2013 and non–storm time of 19–20 September 2013, but the distributions of plasma waves and energetic electrons for the two events were dramatically different. During 17–18 March 2013, the SYM‐H minimum reached −130 nT, intense chorus waves (peak Bw ~140 pT) occurred at 3.5 < L < 5.5, and several hundred keV to several MeV electron fluxes increased by ~2 orders of magnitude mostly at 3.5 < L < 5.5. During 19–20 September 2013, th. . .
Date: 03/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA025114 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JA025114
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2017
Authors: Zhang X.-J., Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Angelopoulos V, and Thorne R M
Title: Contemporaneous EMIC and Whistler-Mode Waves: Observations and Consequences for MeV Electron Loss
Abstract: The high variability of relativistic (MeV) electron fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts is partly controlled by loss processes involving resonant interactions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) and whistler-mode waves. But as previous statistical models were generated independently for each wave mode, whether simultaneous electron scattering by the two wave types has global importance remains an open question. Using >3 years of simultaneous Van Allen Probes and THEMIS measurements, we explore the contemporaneous presence of EMIC and whistler-mode waves in the same L-shell, albeit at different local times, determining the distribution of wave and plasma parameters as a function of L, Kp, and AE. We derive electron lifetimes from observations and provide the first statistics of comb. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073886 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073886/full
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Diffusive transport of several hundred keV electrons in the Earth's slot region
Abstract: We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of ~200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10-day non-disturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L~2.7 to L~2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of ~2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a 3-dimentional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from ~100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the . . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024452 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024452/full
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Authors: Chu X., Bortnik J, Li W, Ma Q, Denton R., et al.
Title: A neural network model of three-dimensional dynamic electron density in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: A plasma density model of the inner magnetosphere is important for a variety of applications including the study of wave-particle interactions, and wave excitation and propagation. Previous empirical models have been developed under many limiting assumptions and do not resolve short-term variations, which are especially important during storms. We present a three-dimensional dynamic electron density (DEN3D) model developed using a feedforward neural network with electron densities obtained from four satellite missions. The DEN3D model takes spacecraft location and time series of solar and geomagnetic indices (F10.7, SYM-H, and AL) as inputs. It can reproduce the observed density with a correlation coefficient of 0.95 and predict test data set with error less than a factor of 2. Its predict. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024464 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024464/full
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Authors: Ma Q, Artemyev A. V., Mourenas D., Li W, Thorne R M, et al.
Title: Very Oblique Whistler Mode Propagation in the Radiation Belts: Effects of Hot Plasma and Landau Damping
Abstract: Satellite observations of a significant population of very oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt have fueled considerable interest in the effects of these waves on energetic electron scattering and acceleration. However, corresponding diffusion rates are extremely sensitive to the refractive index N, controlled by hot plasma effects including Landau damping and wave dispersion modifications by suprathermal (15–100 eV) electrons. A combined investigation of wave and electron distribution characteristics obtained from the Van Allen Probes shows that peculiarities of the measured electron distribution significantly reduce Landau damping, allowing wave propagation with high N ∼ 100–200. Further comparing measured refractive indexes with theoretical estimates incorporating hot . . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL075892 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL075892/full
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2016
Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Characteristic energy range of electron scattering due to plasmaspheric hiss
Abstract: We investigate the characteristic energy range of electron flux decay due to the interaction with plasmaspheric hiss in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The Van Allen Probes have measured the energetic electron flux decay profiles in the Earth's outer radiation belt during a quiet period following the geomagnetic storm that occurred on 7 November 2015. The observed energy of significant electron decay increases with decreasing L shell and is well correlated with the energy band corresponding to the first adiabatic invariant μ = 4–200 MeV/G. The electron diffusion coefficients due to hiss scattering are calculated at L = 2–6, and the modeled energy band of effective pitch angle scattering is also well correlated with the constant μ lines and is consistent with the observed e. . .
Date: 11/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023311 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023311/full
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Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: Direct evidence for EMIC wave scattering of relativistic electrons in space
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been proposed to cause efficient losses of highly relativistic (>1 MeV) electrons via gyroresonant interactions. Simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and equatorial electron pitch angle distributions, which can be used to directly quantify the EMIC wave scattering effect, are still very limited, however. In the present study, we evaluate the effect of EMIC waves on pitch angle scattering of ultrarelativistic (>1 MeV) electrons during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm, when intense EMIC wave activity was observed in situ (in the plasma plume region with high plasma density) on both Van Allen Probes. EMIC waves captured by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes and on the ground across the. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022521 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022521
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Ni Binbin, Ma Qianli, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, et al.
Title: Formation of Energetic Electron Butterfly Distributions by Magnetosonic Waves via Landau Resonance
Abstract: Radiation belt electrons can exhibit different types of pitch angle distributions in response to various magnetospheric processes. Butterfly distributions, characterized by flux minima at pitch angles around 90°, are broadly observed in both the outer and inner belts and the slot region. Butterfly distributions close to the outer magnetospheric boundary have been attributed to drift shell splitting and losses to the magnetopause. However, their occurrence in the inner belt and the slot region has hitherto not been resolved. By analyzing the particle and wave data collected by the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm, we combine test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck simulations to reveal that scattering by equatorial magnetosonic waves is a significant cause for the formation. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL067853 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL067853http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL067853
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Authors: Li W, Santolik O, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: New Chorus Wave Properties Near the Equator from Van Allen Probes Wave Observations
Abstract: The chorus wave properties are evaluated using Van Allen Probes data in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere. Two distinct modes of lower band chorus are identified: a quasi-parallel mode and a quasi-electrostatic mode, whose wave normal direction is close to the resonance cone. Statistical results indicate that the quasi-electrostatic (quasi-parallel) mode preferentially occurs during relatively quiet (disturbed) geomagnetic activity at lower (higher) L shells. Although the magnetic intensity of the quasi-electrostatic mode is considerably weaker than the quasi-parallel mode, their electric intensities are comparable. A newly identified feature of the quasi-electrostatic mode is that its frequency peaks at higher values compared to the quasi-parallel mode that exhibits a broad frequency s. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068780 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068780
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Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, Ma Q, et al.
Title: Physical mechanism causing rapid changes in ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distributions right after a shock arrival: Evaluation of an electron dropout event
Abstract: Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain relativistic electron flux depletions (dropouts) in the Earth's outer radiation belt during storm times: adiabatic expansion of electron drift shells due to a decrease in magnetic field strength, magnetopause shadowing and subsequent outward radial diffusion, and precipitation into the atmosphere (driven by EMIC wave scattering). Which mechanism predominates in causing electron dropouts commonly observed in the outer radiation belt is still debatable. In the present study, we evaluate the physical mechanism that may be primarily responsible for causing the sudden change in relativistic electron pitch angle distributions during a dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes during the main phase of the 27 February 2014 storm. During this event, t. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022517 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022517/abstract
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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations
Abstract: Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak loca. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5520 - 5536 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v121.610.1002/2016JA022400 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022400
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Nishimura Y., Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt
Abstract: The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetra. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022507 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022507
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Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Statistical distribution of EMIC wave spectra: Observations from Van Allen Probes
Abstract: It has been known that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can precipitate ultrarelativistic electrons through cyclotron resonant scattering. However, the overall effectiveness of this mechanism has yet to be quantified, because it is difficult to obtain the global distribution of EMIC waves that usually exhibit limited spatial presence. We construct a statistical distribution of EMIC wave frequency spectra and their intensities based on Van Allen Probes measurements from September 2012 to December 2015. Our results show that as the ratio of plasma frequency over electron gyrofrequency increases, EMIC wave power becomes progressively dominated by the helium band. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry in the wave amplitude and the frequency spectrum. The frequency spectrum does n. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071158 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071158/full
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Authors: Li W, Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Bortnik J, Thorne R M, et al.
Title: Unraveling the excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus waves
Abstract: Excitation mechanisms of highly oblique, quasi-electrostatic lower band chorus waves are investigated using Van Allen Probes observations near the equator of the Earth's magnetosphere. Linear growth rates are evaluated based on in situ, measured electron velocity distributions and plasma conditions and compared with simultaneously observed wave frequency spectra and wave normal angles. Accordingly, two distinct excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus have been clearly identified for the first time. The first mechanism relies on cyclotron resonance with electrons possessing both a realistic temperature anisotropy at keV energies and a plateau at 100–500 eV in the parallel velocity distribution. The second mechanism corresponds to Landau resonance with a 100–500 eV . . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 8867 - 8875 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1710.1002/2016GL070386 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL070386/abstract
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2015
Authors: de Soria-Santacruz M., Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Technique sensitivity analysis
Abstract: A novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron measurements from the POES spacecraft has been previously proposed to construct a global dynamic model of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves. In this paper we focus on plasmaspheric hiss, which is an incoherent broadband emission that plays a dominant role in the loss of energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere. We analyze the sensitivity of the POES technique to different inputs used to infer the hiss wave amplitudes during three conjunction events with the Van Allen Probes. These amplitudes are calculated with different input models of the plasma density, wave frequency spectrum, and electron energy spectrum, and the results are compared to the wave observations from the twin Van Allen Probes. Only. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020941 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020941
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Authors: de Soria-Santacruz M., Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Validation with conjunctive Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. The interaction of plasmaspheric hiss with radiation belt electrons is commonly evaluated using diffusion codes, which rely on statistical models of wave observations that may not accurately reproduce the instantaneous global wave distribution, or the limited in-situ satellite wave measurements from satellites. This paper evaluates the performance and limitations of a novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron flux observations from the POES spacecraft, which provide extensive coverage in L-shell and MLT. We found that, within its limitations, this technique could potentially be used to build a dynamic global model of the plasmasp. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021148 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JA021148/abstract
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Authors: Li W, Chen L, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: First Evidence for Chorus at a Large Geocentric Distance as a Source of Plasmaspheric Hiss: Coordinated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Observation
Abstract: Recent ray tracing suggests that plasmaspheric hiss can originate from chorus observed outside of the plasmapause. Although a few individual events have been reported to support this mechanism, the number of reported conjugate events is still very limited. Using coordinated observations between THEMIS and Van Allen Probes, we report on an interesting event, where chorus was observed at a large L-shell (~9.8), different from previously reported events at L < 6, but still exhibited a remarkable correlation with hiss observed in the outer plasmasphere (L ~ 5.5). Ray tracing indicates that a subset of chorus can propagate into the observed location of hiss on a timescale of ~ 5-6 s, in excellent agreement with the observed time lag between chorus and hiss. This provides quantitative support th. . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062832 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062832
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Ni B, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Modeling inward diffusion and slow decay of energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt
Abstract: A new 3D diffusion code is used to investigate the inward intrusion and slow decay of energetic radiation belt electrons (>0.5 MeV) observed by the Van Allen Probes during a 10-day quiet period in March 2013. During the inward transport the peak differential electron fluxes decreased by approximately an order of magnitude at various energies. Our 3D radiation belt simulation including radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by plasmaspheric hiss and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves reproduces the essential features of the observed electron flux evolution. The decay timescales and the pitch angle distributions in our simulation are consistent with the Van Allen Probes observations over multiple energy channels. Our study suggests that the quiet-time energetic electro. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062977 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062977
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Baker D N, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis
Abstract: Determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and . . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065342 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015GL065342/abstract
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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their Effects on radiation belt electron dynamics
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak frequencies are generally lower than the commonly adopted value (~550 Hz), which was in frequent use, and that the hiss wave power frequently extends below 100 Hz, particularly at larger L shells (> ~3) on the dayside during enhanced levels of substorm activity. We also compare electron pitch angle scattering rates caused by hiss . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021048 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021048
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2014
Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Green J C, et al.
Title: Calculation of whistler-mode wave intensity using energetic electron precipitation
Abstract: The energetic electron population measured by multiple low-altitude POES satellites is used to infer whistlermode wave amplitudes using a physics-based inversion technique. We validate this technique by quantitatively analyzing a conjunction event between the Van Allen Probes and POES, and find that the inferred hiss wave amplitudes from POES electron measurements agree remarkably well with directly measured hiss waves amplitudes. We also use this technique to construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity with extensive coverage over a broad L-MLT region during the 8–9 October 2012 storm and demonstrate that the inferred chorus wave amplitudes agree well with conjugate measurements of chorus wave amplitudes from the Van Allen Probes. The evolution of the whistler-mode wave i. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929965 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929965
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Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Li W, Bortnik J, Ni B, et al.
Title: Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1960 - 1979 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2014JA019770 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019770
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Authors: Li W, Mourenas D., Artemyev A., Agapitov O., Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Evidence of stronger pitch angle scattering loss caused by oblique whistler-mode waves as compared with quasi-parallel waves
Abstract: Wave normal distributions of lower-band whistler-mode waves observed outside the plasmapause exhibit two peaks; one near the parallel direction and the other at very oblique angles. We analyze a number of conjunction events between the Van Allen Probes near the equatorial plane and POES satellites at conjugate low altitudes, where lower-band whistler-mode wave amplitudes were inferred from the two-directional POES electron measurements over 30–100 keV, assuming that these waves were quasi-parallel. For conjunction events, the wave amplitudes inferred from the POES electron measurements were found to be overestimated as compared with the Van Allen Probes measurements primarily for oblique waves and quasi-parallel waves with small wave amplitudes (< ~20 pT) measured at low latitudes. This . . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061260 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061260
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Authors: Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Li X, Henderson M G, Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Gradual diffusion and punctuated phase space density enhancements of highly relativistic electrons: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E ~10 MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L ~4.0 ± 0.5). Thi. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1351 - 1358 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058942 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058942
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Authors: Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Hoxie V C, Thorne R M, Foster J. C., et al.
Title: An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Early observations1, 2 indicated that the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies3, 4 showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep ‘slot’ region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary5, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location6. Re. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Nature Pages: 531 - 534 DOI: 10.1038/nature13956 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature13956
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Nishimura Y., et al.
Title: Quantifying hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation: A detailed conjunction event analysis
Abstract: We analyze a conjunction event between the Van Allen Probes and the low-altitude Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) to quantify hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation. A physics-based technique based on quasi-linear diffusion theory is used to estimate the ratio of precipitated and trapped electron fluxes (R), which could be measured by the two-directional POES particle detectors, using wave and plasma parameters observed by the Van Allen Probes. The remarkable agreement between modeling and observations suggests that this technique is applicable for quantifying hiss-driven electron scattering near the bounce loss cone. More importantly, R in the 100–300 keV energy channel measured by multiple POES satellites over a broad L magnetic local time region can potentially pr. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1085 - 1092 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059132 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059132
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Ni B, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiati. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4681 - 4693 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.610.1002/2014JA019945 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.6http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019945
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ma Q, Ni B, and Bortnik J
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is suggested to be fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron population to ultra-relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to multi MeV within ∼15 hours. A clear peak in electron phase space density observed at L∗ ∼ 4 indicates that the internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements by multiple POES satellites over a broad L-MLT region, which is used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929882 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929882
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Authors: Gao X., Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: Statistical results describing the bandwidth and coherence coefficient of whistler mode waves using THEMIS waveform data
Abstract: The bandwidths and coherence coefficients of lower band whistler mode waves are analyzed using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) waveform data for rising tones, falling tones, and hiss-like emissions separately. We also evaluate their dependences on the spatial location, electron density, the ratio of plasma frequency to local electron gyrofrequency (fpe/fce), and the wave amplitude. Our results show that the bandwidth normalized by the local electron gyrofrequency (fce) of rising and falling tones is very narrow (~0.01 fce), smaller than that of the hiss-like emissions (~0.025 fce). Meanwhile, the normalized bandwidth of discrete emissions gradually decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas that of hiss-like emissions increases slowly. Th. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020158 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020158
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Chen L, Thorne R M, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: The trapping of equatorial magnetosonic waves in the Earth's outer plasmasphere
Abstract: We investigate the excitation and propagation of equatorial magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes and describe evidence for a trapping mechanism for magnetosonic waves in the Earth's plasmasphere. Intense equatorial magnetosonic waves were observed inside the plasmasphere in association with a pronounced proton ring distribution, which provides free energy for wave excitation. Instability analysis along the inbound orbit demonstrates that broadband magnetosonic waves can be excited over a localized spatial region near the plasmapause. The waves can subsequently propagate into the inner plasmasphere and remain trapped over a limited radial extent, consistent with the predictions of near-perpendicular propagation. By performing a similar analysis on another observed magnetosoni. . .
Date: 09/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6307 - 6313 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061414 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061414
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2013
Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Green J C, et al.
Title: Constructing the global distribution of chorus wave intensity using measurements of electrons by the POES satellites and waves by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We adopt a physics-based technique to infer chorus wave amplitudes from the low-altitude electron population (30–100 keV) measured by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage over a broad region in L-shell and magnetic local time (MLT). This technique is validated by analyzing conjunction events between the Van Allen Probes measuring chorus wave amplitudes near the equator and POES satellites measuring the 30–100 keV electron population at the conjugate low altitudes. We apply this technique to construct the chorus wave distributions during the 8–9 October storm in 2012 and demonstrate that the inferred chorus wave amplitudes agree reasonably well with conjugate measurements of chorus wave amplitudes from the Van Allen Probes. The . . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4526 - 4532 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v40.1710.1002/grl.50920 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v40.17http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50920
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Authors: Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, Acuna M, MacDowall R J, Torbert R B, et al.
Title: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on RBSP
Abstract: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation on the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (now named the Van Allen Probes) mission provides key wave and very low frequency magnetic field measurements to understand radiation belt acceleration, loss, and transport. The key science objectives and the contribution that EMFISIS makes to providing measurements as well as theory and modeling are described. The key components of the instruments suite, both electronics and sensors, including key functional parameters, calibration, and performance, demonstrate that EMFISIS provides the needed measurements for the science of the RBSP mission. The EMFISIS operational modes and data products, along with online availability and data tools provide the radiation bel. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9993-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9993-6
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Authors: Reeves G D, Spence H E, Henderson M G, Morley S. K., Friedel R H W, et al.
Title: Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth’s magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA’s Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belt. . .
Date: 07/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 991 - 994 DOI: 10.1126/science.1237743 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.1237743
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ni B, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Evolution and slow decay of an unusual narrow ring of relativistic electrons near L ~ 3.2 following the September 2012 magnetic storm
Abstract: A quantitative analysis is performed on the decay of an unusual ring of relativistic electrons between 3 and 3.5 RE, which was observed by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instrument on the Van Allen probes. The ring formed on 3 September 2012 during the main phase of a magnetic storm due to the partial depletion of the outer radiation belt for L > 3.5, and this remnant belt of relativistic electrons persisted at energies above 2 MeV, exhibiting only slow decay, until it was finally destroyed during another magnetic storm on 1 October. This long-term stability of the relativistic electron ring was associated with the rapid outward migration and maintenance of the plasmapause to distances greater than L = 4. The remnant ring was thus immune from the dynamic process, whic. . .
Date: 06/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/grl.50627 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50627/full
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Authors: Baker D N, Kanekal S G, Hoxie V C, Henderson M G, Li X, et al.
Title: A Long-Lived Relativistic Electron Storage Ring Embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen Belt
Abstract: Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unc. . .
Date: 04/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 186-190 DOI: 10.1126/science.1233518 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6129/186
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ni B, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Rapid local acceleration of relativistic radiation-belt electrons by magnetospheric chorus
Abstract: Recent analysis of satellite data obtained during the 9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm identified the development of peaks in electron phase space density1, which are compelling evidence for local electron acceleration in the heart of the outer radiation belt2, 3, but are inconsistent with acceleration by inward radial diffusive transport4, 5. However, the precise physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration on 9 October was not identified. Previous modelling has indicated that a magnetospheric electromagnetic emission known as chorus could be a potential candidate for local electron acceleration6, 7, 8, 9, 10, but a definitive resolution of the importance of chorus for radiation-belt acceleration was not possible because of limitations in the energy range and resolution of previous. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Nature Pages: 411 - 414 DOI: 10.1038/nature12889 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature12889
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Authors: Spence H E, Reeves G D, Baker D N, Blake J B, Bolton M, et al.
Title: Science Goals and Overview of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite on NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Mission
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)-Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite contains an innovative complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere and radiation belts. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state-of-the-art theory and modeling, are necessary for understanding the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA’s Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) senso. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 311-336 DOI: DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-0007-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-0007-5
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: An unusual enhancement of low-frequency plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere associated with substorm-injected electrons
Abstract: Both plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves were observed simultaneously by the two Van Allen Probes in association with substorm-injected energetic electrons. Probe A, located inside the plasmasphere in the postdawn sector, observed intense plasmaspheric hiss, whereas Probe B observed chorus waves outside the plasmasphere just before dawn. Dispersed injections of energetic electrons were observed in the dayside outer plasmasphere associated with significant intensification of plasmaspheric hiss at frequencies down to ~20 Hz, much lower than typical hiss wave frequencies of 100–2000 Hz. In the outer plasmasphere, the upper energy of injected electrons agrees well with the minimum cyclotron resonant energy calculated for the lower cutoff frequency of the observed hiss, and computed conve. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3798 - 3803 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50787 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50787
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2012
Authors: Jordanova V K, Welling D T, Zaharia S G, Chen L, and Thorne R M
Title: Modeling ring current ion and electron dynamics and plasma instabilities during a high-speed stream driven storm
Abstract: 1] The temporal and spatial development of the ring current is evaluated during the 23–26 October 2002 high-speed stream (HSS) storm, using a kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB). The effects of nondipolar magnetic field configuration are investigated on both ring current ion and electron dynamics. As the self-consistent magnetic field is depressed at large (>4RE) radial distances on the nightside during the storm main phase, the particles' drift velocities increase, the ion and electron fluxes are reduced and the ring current is confined closer to Earth. In contrast to ions, the electron fluxes increase closer to Earth and the fractional electron energy reaches ∼20% near storm peak due to better electron trapping in a nondipo. . .
Date: 09/2012 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 1978–2012 DOI: 10.1029/2011JA017433 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2011JA017433/full
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2007
Authors: Li W, Shprits Y Y, and Thorne R M
Title: Dynamic evolution of energetic outer zone electrons due to wave-particle interactions during storms
Abstract: [1] Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt are subjected to pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), and hiss waves. Using quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for cyclotron resonance with field-aligned waves, we examine whether the resonant interactions with chorus waves produce a net acceleration or loss of relativistic electrons. We also examine the effect of pitch angle scattering by EMIC and hiss waves during the main and recovery phases of a storm. The numerical simulations show that wave-particle interactions with whistler mode chorus waves with realistic wave spectral properties result in a net acceleration of relativistic electrons, while EMIC waves, which provide very fast scattering near the edge of the loss cone, may be a domi. . .
Date: 10/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2007JA012368 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007JA012368/full
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Authors: Thorne R M, Shprits Y Y, Meredith N P, Horne R B, Li W, et al.
Title: Refilling of the slot region between the inner and outer electron radiation belts during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: [1] Energetic electrons (≥50 keV) are injected into the slot region (2 < L < 4) between the inner and outer radiation belts during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms. Enhanced convection from the plasma sheet can account for the storm-time injection at lower energies but does not explain the rapid appearance of higher-energy electrons (≥150 keV). The effectiveness of either radial diffusion (driven by enhanced ULF waves) or local acceleration (during interactions with enhanced whistler mode chorus emissions), as a potential source for refilling the slot at higher energies, is analyzed for observed conditions during the early recovery phase of the 10 October 1990 storm. We demonstrate that local acceleration, driven by observed chorus emissions, can account for the rapid enh. . .
Date: 06/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012176 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012176/abstract
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2006
Authors: Bortnik J, Thorne R M, O’Brien T P, Green J C, Strangeway R J, et al.
Title: Observation of two distinct, rapid loss mechanisms during the 20 November 2003 radiation belt dropout event
Abstract: The relativistic electron dropout event on 20 November 2003 is studied using data from a number of satellites including SAMPEX, HEO, ACE, POES, and FAST. The observations suggest that the dropout may have been caused by two separate mechanisms that operate at high and low L-shells, respectively, with a separation at L ∼ 5. At high L-shells (L > 5), the dropout is approximately independent of energy and consistent with losses to the magnetopause aided by the Dst effect and outward radial diffusion which can deplete relativistic electrons down to lower L-shells. At low L-shells (L < 5), the dropout is strongly energy-dependent, with the higher-energy electrons being affected most. Moreover, large precipitation bands of both relativistic electrons and energetic protons are observed at low L. . .
Date: 12/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011802 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011802/abstract
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Authors: Shprits Y Y, Thorne R M, Friedel R, Reeves G D, Fennell J, et al.
Title: Outward radial diffusion driven by losses at magnetopause
Abstract: Loss mechanisms responsible for the sudden depletions of the outer electron radiation belt are examined based on observations and radial diffusion modeling, with L*-derived boundary conditions. SAMPEX data for October–December 2003 indicate that depletions often occur when the magnetopause is compressed and geomagnetic activity is high, consistent with outward radial diffusion for L* > 4 driven by loss to the magnetopause. Multichannel Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO) satellite observations show that depletions at higher L occur at energies as low as a few hundred keV, which excludes the possibility of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave-driven pitch angle scattering and loss to the atmosphere at L* > 4. We further examine the viability of the outward radial diffusion loss by comp. . .
Date: 11/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011657 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011657/abstract
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2005
Authors: Thorne R M, O'Brien T. P., Shprits Y. Y., Summers D., and Horne R. B.
Title: Timescale for MeV electron microburst loss during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: Energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt can resonate with intense bursts of whistler-mode chorus emission leading to microburst precipitation into the atmosphere. The timescale for removal of outer zone MeV electrons during the main phase of the October 1998 magnetic storm has been computed by comparing the rate of microburst loss observed on SAMPEX with trapped flux levels observed on Polar. Effective lifetimes are comparable to a day and are relatively independent of L shell. The lifetimes have also been evaluated by theoretical calculations based on quasi-linear scattering by field-aligned waves. Agreement with the observations requires average wide-band wave amplitudes comparable to 100 pT, which is consistent with the intensity of chorus emissions observed under active conditi. . .
Date: 09/2005 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2004JA010882 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2004JA010882/abstract
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