Biblio

Found 7 results
Filters: Author is MacDonald, E. A.  [Clear All Filters]
2017
Authors: Denton M. H., Thomsen M F, Reeves G D, Larsen B A, Henderson M G, et al.
Title: The Evolution of the Plasma Sheet Ion Composition: Storms and Recoveries
Abstract: The ion plasma sheet (~few hundred eV to ~few 10s keV) is usually dominated by H+ ions. Here, changes in ion composition within the plasma sheet are explored both during individual events, and statistically during 54 calm-to-storm events and during 21 active-to-calm events. Ion composition data from the HOPE (Helium, Oxygen, Proton, Electron) instruments onboard Van Allen Probes satellites provide exceptional spatial and temporal resolution of the H+, O+, and He+ ion fluxes in the plasma sheet. H+ shown to be the dominant ion in the plasma sheet in the calm-to-storm transition. However, the energy-flux of each ion changes in a quasi-linear manner during extended calm intervals. Heavy ions (O+ and He+) become increasingly important during such periods as charge-exchange reactions result in . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024475 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024475/full
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Authors: Tetrick S. S., Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Olson C. N., Smith C W, et al.
Title: Location of intense electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave events relative to the plasmapause: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: We have studied the spatial location relative to the plasmapause (PP) of the most intense electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed on Van Allen Probes A and B during their first full precession in local time. Most of these waves occurred over an L range of from -1 to +2 RE relative to the PP. Very few events occurred only within 0.1 RE of the PP, and events with a width in L of < 0.2 REoccurred both inside and outside the PP. Wave occurrence was always associated with high densities of ring current ions; plasma density gradients or enhancements were associated with some events but were not dominant factors in determining the sites of wave generation. Storm main and recovery phase events in the dusk sector were often inside the PP, and dayside events during quiet times and co. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023392 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023392
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2015
Authors: Dixon P., MacDonald E A, Funsten H O, Glocer A., Grande M., et al.
Title: Multipoint observations of the open-closed field line boundary as observed by the Van Allen Probes and geostationary satellites during the November 14 th 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft witnessed a series of lobe encounters between 0200 and 0515 UT on November 14th 2012. Although lobe entry had been observed previously by the other spacecraft, the two Van Allen Probe spacecraft allow us to observe the motion of the boundary for the first time. Moreover, this event is unique in that it consists of a series of six quasi-periodic lobe entries. The events occurred on the dawn flank between 4 and 6.6 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst dropped to less than -100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = −15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Observations by LANL GEO spacecraft at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe encounters in the northern hemisphere and on the dusk flank. The two spacecraf. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020883 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020883
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Authors: Zhang J.-C., Kistler L. M., Spence H E, Wolf R. A., Reeves G., et al.
Title: “Trunk-like” heavy ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Dynamic ion spectral features in the inner magnetosphere are the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. We report “trunk-like” ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes on 2 November 2012. This new type of ion structure looks like an elephant's trunk on an energy-time spectrogram, with the energy of the peak flux decreasing Earthward. The trunks are present in He+ and O+ ions but not in H+. During the event, ion energies in the He+ trunk, located at L = 3.6–2.6, MLT = 9.1–10.5, and MLAT = −2.4–0.09°, vary monotonically from 3.5 to 0.04 keV. The values at the two end points of the O+ trunk are: energy = 4.5–0.7 keV, L = 3.6–2.5, MLT = 9.1–10.7, and MLAT = −2.4–0.4°. Results from backward ion drift path tra. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021822 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021822http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021822
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2014
Authors: Boardsen S. A., Hospodarsky G B, Kletzing C A, Pfaff R. F., Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probe Observations of Periodic Rising Frequencies of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode
Abstract: Near simultaneous periodic dispersive features of fast magnetosonic mode emissions are observed by both Van Allen Probes spacecraft while separated in magnetic local time by ~5 hours: Probe A at 15 and Probe B at 9–11 hours. Both spacecraft see similar frequency features, characterized by a periodic repetition at ~180 s. Each repetition is characterized by a rising frequency. Since no modulation is observed in the proton shell distribution, the plasma density, or in the background magnetic field at either spacecraft we conclude that these waves are not generated near the spacecraft but external to both spacecraft locations. Probe A while outside the plasmapause sees the start of each repetition ~40 s before probe B while deep inside the plasmasphere. We can qualitatively reproduce . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062020 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062020
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2013
Authors: Funsten H O, Skoug R M, Guthrie A A, MacDonald E A, Baldonado J R, et al.
Title: Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) Mass Spectrometer for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission
Abstract: The HOPE mass spectrometer of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission (renamed the Van Allen Probes) is designed to measure the in situ plasma ion and electron fluxes over 4π sr at each RBSP spacecraft within the terrestrial radiation belts. The scientific goal is to understand the underlying physical processes that govern the radiation belt structure and dynamics. Spectral measurements for both ions and electrons are acquired over 1 eV to 50 keV in 36 log-spaced steps at an energy resolution ΔE FWHM/E≈15 %. The dominant ion species (H+, He+, and O+) of the magnetosphere are identified using foil-based time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with channel electron multiplier (CEM) detectors. Angular measurements are derived using five polar pixels coplanar with the spacecraft spin. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9968-7 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9968-7
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Authors: Spence H E, Reeves G D, Baker D N, Blake J B, Bolton M, et al.
Title: Science Goals and Overview of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite on NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Mission
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)-Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite contains an innovative complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere and radiation belts. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state-of-the-art theory and modeling, are necessary for understanding the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA’s Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) senso. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 311-336 DOI: DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-0007-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-0007-5
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