Biblio

Found 8 results
Filters: Author is Chen, Yue  [Clear All Filters]
2019
Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, Fu Xiangrong, and Henderson Michael
Title: PreMevE: New Predictive Model for Megaelectron-volt Electrons inside Earth's Outer Radiation Belt
Abstract: This work designs a new model called PreMevE to predict storm‐time distributions of relativistic electrons within Earth's outer radiation belt. This model takes advantage of the cross‐energy, ‐L‐shell, and –pitch‐angle coherence associated with wave‐electron resonant interactions, ingests observations from belt boundaries—mainly by NOAA POES in low‐Earth‐orbits (LEOs), and provides high‐fidelity nowcast (multiple‐hour prediction) and forecast (> ~1 day) of MeV electron fluxes over L‐shells between 2.8‐7 through linear prediction filters. PreMevE can not only reliably anticipate incoming enhancements of MeV electrons during storms with at least 1‐day forewarning time, but also accurately specify the evolving event‐specific electron spatial distributions after. . .
Date: 02/2019 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2018SW002095 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018SW002095
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2016
Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, Cunningham Gregory S., Redmon Robert J., and Henderson Michael G.
Title: Forecasting and remote sensing outer belt relativistic electrons from low Earth orbit
Abstract: This study demonstrates the feasibility and reliability of using observations from low Earth orbit (LEO) to forecast and nowcast relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt. We first report a high cross-energy, cross-pitch-angle coherence discovered between the trapped MeV electrons and precipitating approximately hundreds (~100s) of keV electrons—observed by satellites with very different altitudes—with correlation coefficients as high as ≳ 0.85. Based upon the coherence, we then tested the feasibility of applying linear prediction filters to LEO data to predict the arrival of new MeV electrons during geomagnetic storms, as well as their evolving distributions afterward. Reliability of these predictive filters is quantified by the performance efficiency with values as high . . .
Date: 02/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1031 - 1038 DOI: 10.1002/2015GL067481 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL067481/full
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2014
Authors: Yu Yiqun, Koller Josef, Jordanova Vania K., Zaharia Sorin G., Friedel Reinhard W., et al.
Title: Application and testing of the L * neural network with the self-consistent magnetic field model of RAM-SCB
Abstract: We expanded our previous work on L* neural networks that used empirical magnetic field models as the underlying models by applying and extending our technique to drift shells calculated from a physics-based magnetic field model. While empirical magnetic field models represent an average, statistical magnetospheric state, the RAM-SCB model, a first-principles magnetically self-consistent code, computes magnetic fields based on fundamental equations of plasma physics. Unlike the previous L* neural networks that include McIlwain L and mirror point magnetic field as part of the inputs, the new L* neural network only requires solar wind conditions and the Dst index, allowing for an easier preparation of input parameters. This new neural network is compared against those previously trained netwo. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1683 - 1692 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019350 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019350
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Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, Friedel Reiner H W, and Cunningham Gregory S.
Title: Global time-dependent chorus maps from low-Earth-orbit electron precipitation and Van Allen Probes data
Abstract: Substorm injected electrons (several–100 s keV) produce whistler-mode chorus waves that are thought to have a major impact on the radiation belts by causing both energization and loss of relativistic electrons in the outer belt. High-altitude measurements, such as those from the Van Allen Probes, provide detailed wave measurements at a few points in the magnetosphere. But physics-based models of radiation-belt dynamics require knowledge of the global distribution of chorus waves. We demonstrate that time-dependent, global distributions of near-equatorial chorus wave intensities can be inferred from low-Earth-orbit (LEO) measurements of precipitating low-energy electrons. We compare in situ observations of near-equatorial chorus waves with LEO observations of precipitating electrons a. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 755 - 761 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059181 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059181
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Authors: Li Zan, Millan Robyn M., Hudson Mary K, Woodger Leslie A., Smith David M., et al.
Title: Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL January 17, 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: a quantitative comparison of simulation with observations
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves were observed at multiple observatory locations for several hours on 17 January 2013. During the wave activity period, a duskside relativistic electron precipitation (REP) event was observed by one of the BARREL balloons, and was magnetically mapped close to GOES-13. We simulate the relativistic electron pitch-angle diffusion caused by gyroresonant interactions with EMIC waves using wave and particle data measured by multiple instruments on board GOES-13 and the Van Allen Probes. We show that the count rate, the energy distribution and the time variation of the simulated precipitation all agree very well with the balloon observations, suggesting that EMIC wave scattering was likely the cause for the precipitation event. The event reported here is . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062273 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062273
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, and Chen Yue
Title: Radial diffusion comparing a THEMIS statistical model with geosynchronous measurements as input
Abstract: The outer boundary energetic electron flux is used as a driver in radial diffusion calculations, and its precise determination is critical to the solution. A new model was proposed recently based on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) measurements to express the boundary flux as three fit functions of solar wind parameters in a response window that depend on energy and which solar wind parameter is used: speed, density, or both. The Dartmouth radial diffusion model has been run using Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geosynchronous satellite measurements as the constraint for a one-month interval in July to August 2004, and the calculated phase space density (PSD) is compared with GPS measurements, at magnetic equatorial plane crossings, as a te. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1863 - 1873 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019320 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019320
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Authors: Chen Yue, Friedel Reiner H W, Henderson Michael G., Claudepierre Seth G., Morley Steven K., et al.
Title: REPAD: An empirical model of pitch angle distributions for energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt
Abstract: We have recently conducted a statistical survey on pitch angle distributions of energetic electrons trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt, and a new empirical model was developed based upon survey results. This model—relativistic electron pitch angle distribution (REPAD)—aims to present statistical pictures of electron equatorial pitch angle distributions, instead of the absolute flux levels, as a function of energy, L shell, magnetic local time, and magnetic activity. To quantify and facilitate this statistical survey, we use Legendre polynomials to fit long-term in situ directional fluxes observed near the magnetic equator from three missions: CRRES, Polar, and LANL-97A. As the first of this kind of model, REPAD covers the whole outer belt region, providing not only the mean an. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1693 - 1708 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019431 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019431
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2007
Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, and Friedel Reiner H W
Title: The energization of relativistic electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt
Abstract: The origin and dynamics of the Van Allen radiation belts is one of the longest-standing questions of the space age, and one that is increasingly important for space applications as satellite systems become more sophisticated, smaller and more susceptible to radiation effects. The precise mechanism by which the Earth's magnetosphere is able to accelerate electrons from thermal to ultrarelativistic energies (Edouble greater than0.5 MeV) has been particularly difficult to definitively resolve. The traditional explanation is that large-scale, fluctuating electric and magnetic fields energize particles through radial diffusion1. More recent theories2, 3 and observations4, 5 have suggested that gyro-resonant wave–particle interactions may be comparable to or more important than radial diffusio. . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Nature Physics Pages: 614 - 617 DOI: 10.1038/nphys655 Available at: http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v3/n9/full/nphys655.html
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