Biblio

Found 41 results
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2019
Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Turner D. L., Jaynes A. N., Hietala H., Koskinen H. E. J., et al.
Title: Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt Response to Interacting Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections
Abstract: We study the response of the outer Van Allen radiation belt during an intense magnetic storm on 15–22 February 2014. Four interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at Earth, of which the three last ones were interacting. Using data from the Van Allen Probes, we report the first detailed investigation of electron fluxes from source (tens of kiloelectron volts) to core (megaelectron volts) energies and possible loss and acceleration mechanisms as a response to substructures (shock, sheath and ejecta, and regions of shock‐compressed ejecta) in multiple interacting ICMEs. After an initial enhancement induced by a shock compression of the magnetosphere, core fluxes strongly depleted and stayed low for 4 days. This sustained depletion can be related to a sequence of ICME substruc. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1927 - 1947 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026238 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026238
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Authors: Mann I. R., Ozeke L. G., Morley S. K., Murphy K. R., Claudepierre S G, et al.
Title: Reply to 'The dynamics of Van Allen belts revisited'
Abstract: N/A
Date: 02/2019 Publisher: Nature Physics Pages: 103 - 104 DOI: 10.1038/nphys4351 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys4351
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Authors: Turner D. L., Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, et al.
Title: The Response of Earth's Electron Radiation Belts to Geomagnetic Storms: Statistics From the Van Allen Probes Era Including Effects From Different Storm Drivers
Abstract: A statistical study was conducted of Earth's radiation belt electron response to geomagnetic storms using NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Data for electrons with energies ranging from 30 keV to 6.3 MeV were included and examined as a function of L‐shell, energy, and epoch time during 110 storms with SYM‐H ≤−50 nT during September 2012 to September 2017 (inclusive). The radiation belt response revealed clear energy and L‐shell dependencies, with tens of keV electrons enhanced at all L‐shells (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6) in all storms during the storm commencement and main phase and then quickly decaying away during the early recovery phase, low hundreds of keV electrons enhanced at lower L‐shells (~3 ≤ L ≤ ~4) in upward of 90% of all storms and then decaying gradually during the rec. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026066 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026066
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Authors: Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, Looper M D, Blake J B, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: A Revised Look at Relativistic Electrons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Zone and Slot Region
Abstract: We describe a new, more accurate procedure for estimating and removing inner zone background contamination from Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) radiation belt measurements. This new procedure is based on the underlying assumption that the primary source of background contamination in the electron measurements at L shells less than three, energetic inner belt protons, is relatively stable. Since a magnetic spectrometer can readily distinguish between foreground electrons and background signals, we are able to exploit the proton stability to construct a model of the background contamination in each MagEIS detector by only considering times when the measurements are known to be background dominated. We demonstrate, for relativistic electron measurements in the inn. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026349 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026349
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2018
Authors: Hartinger M. D., Claudepierre S G, Turner D. L., Reeves G D, Breneman A., et al.
Title: Diagnosis of ULF Wave-Particle Interactions With Megaelectron Volt Electrons: The Importance of Ultrahigh-Resolution Energy Channels
Abstract: Electron flux measurements are an important diagnostic for interactions between ultralow‐frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic (∼1 MeV) electrons. Since measurements are collected by particle detectors with finite energy channel width, they are affected by a phase mixing process that can obscure these interactions. We demonstrate that ultrahigh‐resolution electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer on the Van Allen Probes mission—obtained using a data product that improves the energy resolution by roughly an order of magnitude—are crucial for understanding ULF wave‐particle interactions. In particular, the ultrahigh‐resolution measurements reveal a range of complex dynamics that cannot be resolved by standard measurements. Furthermore, the standard meas. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080291 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080291
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Kunduri B. S. R., Mozer F S, and Turner D. L.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere: a result of the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) potential drop
Abstract: It has been reported that the dynamics of energetic (tens to hundreds of keV) electrons and ions is inconsistent with the theoretical picture in which the large‐scale electric field is a superposition of corotation and convection electric fields. Combining one year of measurements by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, DMSP F‐18 and the Van Allen Probes, we show that subauroral polarization streams are observed when energetic electrons have penetrated below L = 4. Outside the plasmasphere in the premidnight region, potential energy is subtracted from the total energy of ions and added to the total energy of electrons during SAPS onset. This potential energy is converted into radial motion as the energetic particles drift around Earth and leave the SAPS azimuthal sector. As a result, . . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077969 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077969
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Authors: Murphy Kyle R., Watt C. E. J., Mann Ian R., Rae Jonathan, Sibeck David G., et al.
Title: The global statistical response of the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: Using the total radiation belt electron content calculated from Van Allen Probe phase space density (PSD), the time‐dependent and global response of the outer radiation belt during storms is statistically studied. Using PSD reduces the impacts of adiabatic changes in the main phase, allowing a separation of adiabatic and non‐adiabatic effects, and revealing a clear modality and repeatable sequence of events in storm‐time radiation belt electron dynamics. This sequence exhibits an important first adiabatic invariant (μ) dependent behaviour in the seed (150 MeV/G), relativistic (1000 MeV/G), and ultra‐relativistic (4000 MeV/G) populations. The outer radiation belt statistically shows an initial phase dominated by loss followed by a second phase of rapid acceleration, whilst the seed. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL076674 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076674
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Authors: Ripoll ‐F., Loridan V., Denton M. H., Cunningham G., Reeves G., et al.
Title: Observations and Fokker‐Planck simulations of the L‐shell, energy, and pitch‐angle structure of Earth’s electron radiation belts during quiet times
Abstract: The evolution of the radiation belts in L‐shell (L), energy (E), and equatorial pitch‐angle (α0) is analyzed during the calm 11‐day interval (March 4 –March 15) following the March 1 storm 2013. Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) observations from Van Allen Probes are interpreted alongside 1D and 3D Fokker‐Planck simulations combined with consistent event‐driven scattering modeling from whistler mode hiss waves. Three (L, E, α0)‐regions persist through 11 days of hiss wave scattering; the pitch‐angle dependent inner belt core (L~<2.2 and E<700 keV), pitch‐angle homogeneous outer belt low‐energy core (L>~5 and E~<100 keV), and a distinct pocket of electrons (L~[4.5, 5.5] and E~[0.7, 2] MeV). The pitch‐angle homogeneous outer belt is explained by the diff. . .
Date: 12/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026111 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026111
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2017
Authors: Kronberg E. A., Grigorenko E. E., Turner D. L., Daly P. W., Khotyaintsev Y., et al.
Title: Comparing and contrasting dispersionless injections at geosynchronous orbit during a substorm event
Abstract: Particle injections in the magnetosphere transport electrons and ions from the magnetotail to the radiation belts. Here we consider generation mechanisms of “dispersionless” injections, namely, those with simultaneous increase of the particle flux over a wide energy range. In this study we take advantage of multisatellite observations which simultaneously monitor Earth's magnetospheric dynamics from the tail toward the radiation belts during a substorm event. Dispersionless injections are associated with instabilities in the plasma sheet during the growth phase of the substorm, with a dipolarization front at the onset and with magnetic flux pileup during the expansion phase. They show different spatial spread and propagation characteristics. Injection associated with the dipolarization. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023551 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023551/full
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Diffusive transport of several hundred keV electrons in the Earth's slot region
Abstract: We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of ~200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10-day non-disturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L~2.7 to L~2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of ~2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a 3-dimentional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from ~100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the . . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024452 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024452/full
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Authors: Ripoll J.-F., Santol?k O., Reeves G., Kurth W S, Denton M., et al.
Title: Effects of whistler mode hiss waves in March 2013
Abstract: We present simulations of the loss of radiation belt electrons by resonant pitch angle diffusion caused by whistler mode hiss waves for March 2013. Pitch angle diffusion coefficients are computed from the wave properties and the ambient plasma data obtained by the Van Allen Probes with a resolution of 8 hours and 0.1 L-shell. Loss rates follow a complex dynamic structure, imposed by the wave and plasma properties. Hiss effects can be strong, with minimum lifetimes (of ~1 day) moving from energies of ~100 keV at L~5 up to ~2 MeV at L~2, and stop abruptly, similarly to the observed energy-dependent inner belt edge. Periods when the plasmasphere extends beyond L~5 favor long-lasting hiss losses from the outer belt. Such loss rates are embedded in a reduced Fokker-Planck code and validated aga. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024139 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024139/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Lee J. H., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Examining coherency scales, substructure, and propagation of whistler-mode chorus elements with Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)
Abstract: Whistler-mode chorus waves are a naturally occurring electromagnetic emission observed in Earth's magnetosphere. Here, for the first time, data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission were used to analyze chorus waves in detail, including the calculation of chorus wave normal vectors, k. A case study was examined from a period of substorm activity around the time of a conjunction between the MMS constellation and NASA's Van Allen Probes mission on 07 April 2016. Chorus wave activity was simultaneously observed by all six spacecraft over a broad range of L-shells (5.5 < L < 8.5), magnetic local time (06:00 < MLT < 09:00), and magnetic latitude (-32° < MLat < -15°), implying a large chorus active region. Eight chorus elements and their substructure were analyzed in detail with . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024474 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024474/full
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Authors: Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Clemmons J. H., et al.
Title: The hidden dynamics of relativistic electrons (0.7-1.5 MeV) in the inner zone and slot region
Abstract: We present measurements of relativistic electrons (0.7–1.5 MeV) in the inner zone and slot region obtained by the Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument on Van Allen Probes. The data presented are corrected for background contamination, which is primarily due to inner-belt protons in these low-L regions. We find that ∼1 MeV electrons were transported into the inner zone following the two largest geomagnetic storms of the Van Allen Probes era to date, the March and June 2015 events. As ∼1 MeV electrons were not observed in Van Allen Probes data in the inner zone prior to these two events, the injections created a new inner belt that persisted for at least 1.5 years. In contrast, we find that electrons injected into the slot region decay on much faster timescales, a. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023719 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023719http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2016JA023719
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Authors: Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Clemmons J. H., et al.
Title: The hidden dynamics of relativistic electrons (0.7-1.5 MeV) in the inner zone and slot region
Abstract: We present measurements of relativistic electrons (0.7–1.5 MeV) in the inner zone and slot region obtained by the Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument on Van Allen Probes. The data presented are corrected for background contamination, which is primarily due to inner-belt protons in these low-L regions. We find that ∼1 MeV electrons were transported into the inner zone following the two largest geomagnetic storms of the Van Allen Probes era to date, the March and June 2015 events. As ∼1 MeV electrons were not observed in Van Allen Probes data in the inner zone prior to these two events, the injections created a new inner belt that persisted for at least 1.5 years. In contrast, we find that electrons injected into the slot region decay on much faster timescales, a. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023719 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023719
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Authors: Contel O., Nakamura R, Breuillard H., Argall M. R., Graham D. B., et al.
Title: Lower-hybrid drift waves and electromagnetic electron space-phase holes associated with dipolarization fronts and field-aligned currents observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission during a substorm
Abstract: We analyse two ion scale dipolarization fronts associated with field-aligned currents detected by the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission during a large substorm on August 10, 2016. The first event corresponds to a fast dawnward flow with an anti-parallel current and could be generated by the wake of a previous fast earthward flow. It is associated with intense lower-hybrid drift waves detected at the front and propagating dawnward with a perpendicular phase speed close to the electric drift and the ion thermal velocity. The second event corresponds to a flow reversal: from southwward/dawnward to northward/duskward associated with a parallel current consistent with a brief expansion of the plasma sheet before the front crossing, and with a smaller lower-hybrid drift wave activity. Electromag. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024550 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024550/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Claudepierre S G, Clemmons J. H., et al.
Title: Multipoint observations of energetic particle injections and substorm activity during a conjunction between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes
Abstract: This study examines multipoint observations during a conjunction between MMS and Van Allen Probes on 07 April 2016 in which a series of energetic particle injections occurred. With complementary data from THEMIS, Geotail, and LANL-GEO (16 spacecraft in total), we develop new insights on the nature of energetic particle injections associated with substorm activity. Despite this case involving only weak substorm activity (max. AE < 300 nT) during quiet geomagnetic conditions in steady, below-average solar wind, a complex series of at least six different electron injections was observed throughout the system. Intriguingly, only one corresponding ion injection was clearly observed. All ion and electron injections were observed at < 600 keV only. MMS reveals detailed substructure within the lar. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024554 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024554/full
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Authors: Breneman A. W., Crew A., Sample J., Klumpar D., Johnson A., et al.
Title: Observations Directly Linking Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Whistler Mode Chorus: Van Allen Probes and FIREBIRD II
Abstract: We present observations that provide the strongest evidence yet that discrete whistler mode chorus packets cause relativistic electron microbursts. On 20 January 2016 near 1944 UT the low Earth orbiting CubeSat Focused Investigations of Relativistic Electron Bursts: Intensity, Range, and Dynamics (FIREBIRD II) observed energetic microbursts (near L = 5.6 and MLT = 10.5) from its lower limit of 220 keV, to 1 MeV. In the outer radiation belt and magnetically conjugate, Van Allen Probe A observed rising‐tone, lower band chorus waves with durations and cadences similar to the microbursts. No other waves were observed. This is the first time that chorus and microbursts have been simultaneously observed with a separation smaller than a chorus packet. A majority of the microbursts do not have t. . .
Date: 11/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 11,265 - 11,272 DOI: 10.1002/2017GL075001 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/2017GL075001
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Authors: Schiller Q., Tu W., Ali A. F., Li X, Godinez H. C., et al.
Title: Simultaneous event-specific estimates of transport, loss, and source rates for relativistic outer radiation belt electrons
Abstract: The most significant unknown regarding relativistic electrons in Earth's outer Van Allen radiation belt is the relative contribution of loss, transport, and acceleration processes within the inner magnetosphere. Detangling each individual process is critical to improve the understanding of radiation belt dynamics, but determining a single component is challenging due to sparse measurements in diverse spatial and temporal regimes. However, there are currently an unprecedented number of spacecraft taking measurements that sample different regions of the inner magnetosphere. With the increasing number of varied observational platforms, system dynamics can begin to be unraveled. In this work, we employ in situ measurements during the 13–14 January 2013 enhancement event to isolate transport,. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023093 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023093
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Authors: Anderson B. R., Shekhar S., Millan R M, Crew A. B., Spence H E, et al.
Title: Spatial Scale and Duration of One Microburst Region on 13 August 2015
Abstract: Prior studies of microburst precipitation have largely relied on estimates of the spatial scale and temporal duration of the microburst region in order to determine the radiation belt loss rate of relativistic electrons. These estimates have often relied on the statistical distribution of microburst events. However, few studies have directly observed the spatial and temporal evolution of a single microburst event. In this study, we combine BARREL balloon-borne X-ray measurements with FIREBIRD-II and AeroCube-6 CubeSat electron measurements to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of a microburst region in the morning MLT sector on 13 August 2015. The microburst region is found to extend across at least four hours in local time in the morning sector, from 09:00 to 13:00 MLT, and from. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023752 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023752/full
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Authors: Zhao H., Baker D N, Califf S., Li X, Jaynes A. N., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes measurements of energetic particle deep penetration into the low L region (L<4) during the storm on 8 April 2016
Abstract: Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, a penetration event of 10s – 100s of keV electrons and 10s of keV protons into the low L-shells (L<4) is studied. Timing and magnetic local time (MLT) differences of energetic particle deep penetration are unveiled and underlying physical processes are examined. During this event, both proton and electron penetrations are MLT-asymmetric. The observed MLT difference of proton penetration is consistent with convection of plasma sheet protons, suggesting enhanced convection during geomagnetic active times to be the cause of energetic proton deep penetration during this event. The observed MLT difference of 10s – 100s of keV electron penetration is completely different from 10s of keV protons and cannot be well explained by inward radial diffus. . .
Date: 11/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024558 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017JA024558http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2017JA024558/fullpdf
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2016
Authors: Liu Jiang, Angelopoulos V, Zhang Xiao-Jia, Turner D. L., Gabrielse C., et al.
Title: Dipolarizing flux bundles in the cis-geosynchronous magnetosphere: relationship between electric fields and energetic particle injections
Abstract: Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) are small flux tubes (typically < 3 RE in XGSM and YGSM) in the nightside magnetosphere that have magnetic field more dipolar than the background. Although DFBs are known to accelerate particles, creating energetic particle injections outside geosynchronous orbit (trans-GEO), the nature of the acceleration mechanism and the importance of DFBs in generating injections inside geosynchronous orbit (cis-GEO) are unclear. Our statistical study of cis-GEO DFBs using data from the Van Allen Probes reveals that just like trans-GEO DFBs, cis-GEO DFBs occur most often in the pre-midnight sector, but their occurrence rate is ~1/3 that of trans-GEO DFBs. Half the cis-GEO DFBs are accompanied by an energetic particle injection and have an electric field three times stro. . .
Date: 01/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021691 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021691
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Authors: Turner D. L., Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Clemmons J. H., Mauk B H, et al.
Title: Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission
Abstract: We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increa. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 7785 - 7794 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069691 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069691
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Authors: Mann I. R., Ozeke L. G., Murphy K. R., Claudepierre S G, Turner D. L., et al.
Title: Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt
Abstract: Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. Using a datadriven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence o. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Nature Physics DOI: 10.1038/nphys3799 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys3799
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Authors: O'Brien T P, Claudepierre S G, Guild T B, Fennell J. F., Turner D. L., et al.
Title: Inner zone and slot electron radial diffusion revisited
Abstract: Using recent data from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we estimate the quiet time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt (L < 3) with energies from ~50 to 750 keV. The observations are consistent with dynamics dominated by pitch angle scattering and radial diffusion. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate phase space density over pitch angle to obtain a “bundle content” that is invariant to pitch angle scattering, except for atmospheric loss. We estimate the effective radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the bundle content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values obtained in the 1960s and 1970s and follow the form one . . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 7301 - 7310 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069749 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL069749/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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Authors: Kanekal S G, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Jones A., Schiller Q., et al.
Title: Prompt acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to ultrarelativistic energies by the 17 March 2015 interplanetary shock
Abstract: Trapped electrons in Earth's outer Van Allen radiation belt are influenced profoundly by solar phenomena such as high-speed solar wind streams, coronal mass ejections (CME), and interplanetary (IP) shocks. In particular, strong IP shocks compress the magnetosphere suddenly and result in rapid energization of electrons within minutes. It is believed that the electric fields induced by the rapid change in the geomagnetic field are responsible for the energization. During the latter part of March 2015, a CME impact led to the most powerful geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = −223 nT at 17 March, 23 UT) observed not only during the Van Allen Probe era but also the entire preceding decade. Magnetospheric response in the outer radiation belt eventually resulted in elevated levels of energized ele. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7622 - 7635 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022596 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022596
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Authors: Ripoll J. F., Reeves G., Cunningham G., Loridan V., Denton M., et al.
Title: Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model
Abstract: We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt " slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the March 1st storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally-resolved whistler mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L-shells (2 to 6) including (a) the strong energy-dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L-shells at lower energies and (c) an " S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial tran. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068869 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068869
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Authors: Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Turner D. L., Nakamura R, Schmid D., et al.
Title: A telescopic and microscopic examination of acceleration in the June 2015 geomagnetic storm: Magnetospheric Multiscale and Van Allen Probes study of substorm particle injection
Abstract: An active storm period in June 2015 showed that particle injection events seen sequentially by the four (Magnetospheric Multiscale) MMS spacecraft subsequently fed the enhancement of the outer radiation belt observed by Van Allen Probes mission sensors. Several episodes of significant southward interplanetary magnetic field along with a period of high solar wind speed (Vsw ≳ 500 km/s) on 22 June occurred following strong interplanetary shock wave impacts on the magnetosphere. Key events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progressed through a sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigured at 19:32 UT. Energetic electrons, plasma, and magnetic fields measured by the four MMS spacecraft revealed clear dipolarization front. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6051 - 6059 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1210.1002/2016GL069643 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069643
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2015
Authors: Katsavrias C., Daglis I. A., Li W, Dimitrakoudis S., Georgiou M., et al.
Title: Combined effects of concurrent Pc5 and chorus waves on relativistic electron dynamics
Abstract: We present electron phase space density (PSD) calculations as well as concurrent Pc5 and chorus wave activity observations during two intense geomagnetic storms caused by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) resulting in contradicting net effect. We show that, during the 17 March 2013 storm, the coincident observation of chorus and relativistic electron enhancements suggests that the prolonged chorus wave activity seems to be responsible for the enhancement of the electron population in the outer radiation belt even in the presence of pronounced outward diffusion. On the other hand, the significant depletion of electrons, during the 12 September 2014 storm, coincides with long-lasting outward diffusion driven by the continuous enhanced Pc5 activity since chorus wave a. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 1173 - 1181 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-33-1173-2015 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/33/1173/2015/
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Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: The effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons in Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: We use Van Allen Probes data to investigate the responses of 10s of keV to 2 MeV electrons throughout a broad range of the radiation belts (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6.0) during 52 geomagnetic storms from the most recent solar maximum. Electron storm-time responses are highly dependent on both electron energy and L-shell. 10s of keV electrons typically have peak fluxes in the inner belt or near-Earth plasma sheet and fill the inner magnetosphere during storm main phases. ~100 to ~600 keV electrons are enhanced in up to 87% of cases around L~3.7, and their peak flux location moves to lower L-shells during storm recovery phases. Relativistic electrons (≥~1 MeV) are nearly equally likely to produce enhancement, depletion, and no-change events in the outer belt. We also show that the L-shell of peak flu. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064747 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064747
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Authors: Turner D. L., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., O'Brien T P, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere associated with substorm activity
Abstract: From a survey of the first nightside season of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission (Dec/2012 – Sep/2013), 47 energetic (10s to 100s of keV) electron injection events were found at L-shells ≤ 4, all of which are deeper than any previously reported substorm-related injections. Preliminary details from these events are presented, including how: all occurred shortly after dipolarization signatures and injections were observed at higher L-shells; the deepest observed injection was at L~2.5; and, surprisingly, L≤4 injections are limited in energy to ≤250 keV. We present a detailed case study of one example event revealing that the injection of electrons down to L~3.5 was different from injections observed at higher L and likely resulted from drift resonance with a fast magnetosonic wave in t. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063225 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063225
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Authors: Hudson M K, Paral J., Kress B T, Wiltberger M., Baker D N, et al.
Title: Modeling CME-shock driven storms in 2012 - 2013: MHD-test particle simulations
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for CME-shock driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD-test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and pre-noon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch (Hudson et al., 2014). Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020833 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020833
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Authors: Gkioulidou Matina, Ohtani S, Mitchell D G, Ukhorskiy A., Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event.
Abstract: Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ - 40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within ten minutes, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first one is a dispersionless, short timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer t. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020872 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020872
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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2014
Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Morley S. K., Henderson M G, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: On the cause and extent of outer radiation belt losses during the 30 September 2012 dropout event
Abstract: On 30 September 2012, a flux “dropout” occurred throughout Earth's outer electron radiation belt during the main phase of a strong geomagnetic storm. Using eight spacecraft from NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes missions and NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites constellation, we examined the full extent and timescales of the dropout based on particle energy, equatorial pitch angle, radial distance, and species. We calculated phase space densities of relativistic electrons, in adiabatic invariant coordinates, which revealed that loss processes during the dropout were > 90% effective throughout the majority of the outer belt and the plasmapause played a key role in limiting the spatial extent . . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1530 - 1540 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019446 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019446
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Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Li W, Bortnik J, Ni B, et al.
Title: Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1960 - 1979 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2014JA019770 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019770
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Authors: Usanova M. E., Drozdov A., Orlova K., Mann I. R., Shprits Y., et al.
Title: Effect of EMIC waves on relativistic and ultrarelativistic electron populations: Ground-based and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: We study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the loss and pitch angle scattering of relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on 11 October 2012. The EMIC wave activity was observed in situ on the Van Allen Probes and conjugately on the ground across the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity throughout an extended 18 h interval. However, neither enhanced precipitation of >0.7 MeV electrons nor reductions in Van Allen Probe 90° pitch angle ultrarelativistic electron flux were observed. Computed radiation belt electron pitch angle diffusion rates demonstrate that rapid pitch angle diffusion is confined to low pitch angles and cannot reach 90°. For the first time, from both obse. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1375 - 1381 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059024 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059024
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Authors: Jaynes A. N., Li X, Schiller Q. G., Blum L. W., Tu W., et al.
Title: Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during an extended quiescent period
Abstract: To effectively study steady loss due to hiss-driven precipitation of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt, it is useful to isolate this loss by studying a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a case of initial enhancement and slow, steady decay of 700 keV - 2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ~15 December 2012 - 13 January 2013. We incorporate particle measurements from a constellation of satellites, including the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft, and THEMIS, to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. Additional data from calculated phase space density (PSD), as well as hiss and chorus w. . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020125 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020125
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Authors: Boyd A. J., Spence H E, Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Quantifying the radiation belt seed population in the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event
Abstract: We present phase space density (PSD) observations using data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument on the Van Allen Probes for the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event. We confirm previous results and quantify how PSD gradients depend on the first adiabatic invariant. We find a systematic difference between the lower-energy electrons (1 MeV with a source region within the radiation belts. Our observations show that the source process begins with enhancements to the 10s–100s keV energy seed population, followed by enhancements to the >1 MeV population and eventually leading to enhancements in the multi-MeV electron population. These observations provide the clearest evidence to date . . .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2275 - 2281 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059626 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059626
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2013
Authors: Reeves G D, Spence H E, Henderson M G, Morley S. K., Friedel R H W, et al.
Title: Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth’s magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA’s Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belt. . .
Date: 07/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 991 - 994 DOI: 10.1126/science.1237743 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.1237743
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Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
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