Biblio

Found 4 results
Filters: Author is Kanekal, S.  [Clear All Filters]
2019
Authors: Turner D. L., Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, et al.
Title: The Response of Earth's Electron Radiation Belts to Geomagnetic Storms: Statistics From the Van Allen Probes Era Including Effects From Different Storm Drivers
Abstract: A statistical study was conducted of Earth's radiation belt electron response to geomagnetic storms using NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Data for electrons with energies ranging from 30 keV to 6.3 MeV were included and examined as a function of L‐shell, energy, and epoch time during 110 storms with SYM‐H ≤−50 nT during September 2012 to September 2017 (inclusive). The radiation belt response revealed clear energy and L‐shell dependencies, with tens of keV electrons enhanced at all L‐shells (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6) in all storms during the storm commencement and main phase and then quickly decaying away during the early recovery phase, low hundreds of keV electrons enhanced at lower L‐shells (~3 ≤ L ≤ ~4) in upward of 90% of all storms and then decaying gradually during the rec. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026066 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026066
More Details
2016
Authors: Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Claudepierre S., Mazur J, Kanekal S., et al.
Title: Current energetic particle sensors
Abstract: Several energetic particle sensors designed to make measurements in the current decade are described and their technology and capabilities discussed and demonstrated. Most of these instruments are already on orbit or approaching launch. These include the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometers (MagEIS) and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) that are flying on the Van Allen Probes, the Fly's Eye Electron Proton Spectrometers (FEEPS) flying on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, and Dosimeters flying on the AC6 Cubesat mission. We focus mostly on the electron measurement capability of these sensors while providing summary comments of their ion measurement capabilities if they have any.
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022588 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022588/abstract
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
More Details
2013
Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
More Details