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2720 Energetic Particles, trapped
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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2730 Magnetosphere: inner
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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2774 Radiation belts
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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7807 Charged particle motion and acceleration
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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7984 Space radiation environment
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt
Abstract: Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L-shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than one day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can excee. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023600 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023600
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Alfven waves
Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Reeves G D, and Skoug R M
Title: Driving ionospheric outflows and magnetospheric O + energy density with Alfvén waves
Abstract: We show how dispersive Alfvén waves observed in the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms can extract O+ ions from the topside ionosphere and accelerate these ions to energies exceeding 50 keV in the equatorial plane. This occurs through wave trapping, a variant of “shock” surfing, and stochastic ion acceleration. These processes in combination with the mirror force drive field-aligned beams of outflowing ionospheric ions into the equatorial plane that evolve to provide energetic O+ distributions trapped near the equator. These waves also accelerate preexisting/injected ion populations on the same field lines. We show that the action of dispersive Alfvén waves over several minutes may drive order of magnitude increases in O+ ion pressure to make substantial contributions to. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4825 - 4833 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069008 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069008
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Kletzing C A, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Extreme ionospheric ion energization and electron heating in Alfvén waves in the storm-time inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We report measurements of energized outflowing/bouncing ionospheric ions and heated electrons in the inner magnetosphere during a geomagnetic storm. The ions arrive in the equatorial plane with pitch angles that increase with energy over a range from tens of eV to > 50 keV while the electrons are field-aligned up to ~1 keV. These particle distributions are observed during intervals of broadband low frequency electromagnetic field fluctuations consistent with a Doppler-shifted spectrum of kinetic Alfvén waves and kinetic field-line resonances. The fluctuations extend from L≈3 out to the apogee of the Van Allen Probes spacecraft at L≈6.5. They thereby span most of the L-shell range occupied by the ring current. These measurements suggest a model for ionospheric ion outflow and energizat. . .
Date: 12/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL066674 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL066674http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015GL066674
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Halford A J, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Pitch Angle Scattering and Loss of Radiation Belt Electrons in Broadband Electromagnetic Waves
Abstract: A magnetic conjunction between Van Allen Probes spacecraft and the Balloon Array for Radiation‐belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) reveals the simultaneous occurrence of broadband Alfvénic fluctuations and multi‐timescale modulation of enhanced atmospheric X‐ray bremsstrahlung emission. The properties of the Alfvénic fluctuations are used to build a model for pitch angle scattering in the outer radiation belt on electron gyro‐radii scale field structures. It is shown that this scattering may lead to the transport of electrons into the loss cone over an energy range from hundreds of keV to multi‐MeV on diffusive timescales on the order of hours. This process may account for modulation of atmospheric X‐ray fluxes observed from balloons and constitute a significant loss p. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL079527 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL079527
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Radiation belt “dropouts” and drift-bounce resonances in broadband electromagnetic waves
Abstract: Observations during the main phase of geomagnetic storms reveal an anti-correlation between the occurrence of broadband low frequency electromagnetic waves and outer radiation belt electron flux. We show that the drift-bounce motion of electrons in the magnetic field of these waves leads to rapid electron transport. For observed spectral energy densities it is demonstrated that the wave magnetic field can drive radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonance on timescales less than a drift orbit. This process may provide outward transport sufficient to account for electron “dropouts” during storm main phase and more generally modulate the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms.
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL076362 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076362/full
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Radial transport of radiation belt electrons in kinetic field-line resonances
Abstract: A representative case study from the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm recovery phase reveals enhanced electron fluxes at intermediate pitch angles over energies from ~100 keV to 5 MeV coincident with broadband low frequency electromagnetic waves. The statistical properties of these waves are used to build a model for radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonances in kinetic Alfvén eigenmodes/kinetic field-line resonances. Estimated diffusion coefficients indicate timescales for radial transport of the order of hours in storm-time events at energies from <100 keV to MeVs over equatorial pitch angles from the edge of the loss cone to nearly perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The correlation of kinetic resonances with electron depletions and enhancements during storm main phase. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074587 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074587/full
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Astrophysical plasmas
Authors: Mann I. R., Ozeke L. G., Murphy K. R., Claudepierre S G, Turner D. L., et al.
Title: Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt
Abstract: Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. Using a datadriven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence o. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Nature Physics DOI: 10.1038/nphys3799 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys3799
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atmospheric precipitation
Authors: Hwang J., Choi E.-J., Park J.-S., Fok M.-C., Lee D.-Y., et al.
Title: Comprehensive analysis of the flux dropout during 7-8 November 2008 storm using multi-satellites observations and RBE model
Abstract: We investigate an electron flux dropout during a weak storm on 7–8 November 2008, with Dst minimum value being −37 nT. During this period, two clear dropouts were observed on GOES 11 > 2 MeV electrons. We also find a simultaneous dropout in the subrelativistic electrons recorded by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes in the outer radiation belt. Using the Radiation Belt Environment model, we try to reproduce the observed dropout features in both relativistic and subrelativistic electrons. We found that there are local time dependences in the dropout for both observation and simulation in subrelativistic electrons: (1) particle loss begins from nightside and propagates into dayside and (2) resupply starts from near dawn magnetic local time . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021085 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021085
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aurora
Authors: Jaynes A. N., Lessard M. R., Takahashi K., Ali A. F., Malaspina D. M., et al.
Title: Correlated Pc4-5 ULF waves, whistler-mode chorus and pulsating aurora observed by the Van Allen Probes and ground-based systems
Abstract: Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch-angle scattering of 10's keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recently published satellite studies have strengthened this argument, by showing strong correlation between pulsating auroral patches and both lower-band chorus and 10's keV electron modulation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. Additionally, a previous link has been made between Pc4-5 compressional pulsations and modulation of whistler-mode chorus using THEMIS. In the current study, we present simultaneous in-situ observations of structured chorus waves and an apparent field line resonance (in the Pc4-5 range) as a result of a substorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes, along with groun. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021380 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021380
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Background contamination
Authors: Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, Blake J B, Fennell J. F., Roeder J. L., et al.
Title: A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements
Abstract: We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30-500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-MeV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate me. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021171 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021171
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beam instability
Authors: Li W, Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Bortnik J, Thorne R M, et al.
Title: Unraveling the excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus waves
Abstract: Excitation mechanisms of highly oblique, quasi-electrostatic lower band chorus waves are investigated using Van Allen Probes observations near the equator of the Earth's magnetosphere. Linear growth rates are evaluated based on in situ, measured electron velocity distributions and plasma conditions and compared with simultaneously observed wave frequency spectra and wave normal angles. Accordingly, two distinct excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus have been clearly identified for the first time. The first mechanism relies on cyclotron resonance with electrons possessing both a realistic temperature anisotropy at keV energies and a plateau at 100–500 eV in the parallel velocity distribution. The second mechanism corresponds to Landau resonance with a 100–500 eV . . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 8867 - 8875 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1710.1002/2016GL070386 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL070386/abstract
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BSPICE
Authors: Sandhu J. K., Rae I. J., Freeman M. P., Forsyth C., Gkioulidou M., et al.
Title: Energisation of the ring current by substorms
Abstract: The substorm process releases large amounts of energy into the magnetospheric system, although where the energy is transferred to and how it is partitioned remains an open question. In this study, we address whether the substorm process contributes a significant amount of energy to the ring current. The ring current is a highly variable region, and understanding the energisation processes provides valuable insight into how substorm ‐ ring current coupling may contribute to the generation of storm conditions and provide a source of energy for wave driving. In order to quantify the energy input into the ring current during the substorm process, we analyse RBSPICE and HOPE ion flux measurements for H+, O+, and He+. The energy content of the ring current is estimated and binned spatially for. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025766 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025766
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butterfly distributions
Authors: Yu J., Li L.Y., Cao J. B., Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probe in-situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 06:00 - 18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90o (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distrib. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069029
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Authors: Yang Chang, Su Zhenpeng, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: A positive correlation between energetic electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves in the radiation belt slot region
Abstract: Energetic (hundreds of keV) electrons in the radiation belt slot region have been found to exhibit the butterfly pitch angle distributions. Resonant interactions with magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves are two potential mechanisms for the formation of these peculiar distributions. Here we perform a statistical study of energetic electron pitch angle distribution characteristics measured by Van Allen Probes in the slot region during a three-year period from May 2013 to May 2016. Our results show that electron butterfly distributions are closely related to magnetosonic waves rather than to whistler-mode waves. Both electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves occur more frequently at the geomagnetically active times than at the quiet times. In a statistical sense, more distinct . . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073116 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL073116
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Chorus
Authors: Liu Nigang, Su Zhenpeng, Gao Zhonglei, Reeves G D, Zheng Huinan, et al.
Title: Shock-induced disappearance and subsequent recovery of plasmaspheric hiss: Coordinated observations of RBSP, THEMIS and POES satellites
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is an extremely low frequency whistler-mode emission contributing significantly to the loss of radiation belt electrons. There are two main competing mechanisms for the generation of plasmaspheric hiss: excitation by local instability in the outer plasmasphere and origination from chorus outside the plasmasphere. Here, on the basis of the analysis of an event of shock-induced disappearance and subsequent recovery of plasmaspheric hiss observed by RBSP, THEMIS and POES missions, we attempt to identify its dominant generation mechanism. In the pre-shock plasmasphere, the local electron instability was relatively weak and the hiss waves with bidirectional Poynting fluxes mainly originated from the dayside chorus waves. On arrival of the shock, the removal of pre-existing da. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024470 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024470/full
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Authors: Liu Nigang, Su Zhenpeng, Gao Zhonglei, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Simultaneous disappearances of plasmaspheric hiss, exohiss, and chorus waves triggered by a sudden decrease in solar wind dynamic pressure
Abstract: Magnetospheric whistler mode waves are of great importance in the radiation belt electron dynamics. Here on the basis of the analysis of a rare event with the simultaneous disappearances of whistler mode plasmaspheric hiss, exohiss, and chorus triggered by a sudden decrease in the solar wind dynamic pressure, we provide evidences for the following physical scenarios: (1) nonlinear generation of chorus controlled by the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, (2) origination of plasmaspheric hiss from chorus, and (3) leakage of plasmaspheric hiss into exohiss. Following the reduction of the solar wind dynamic pressure, the dayside geomagnetic field configuration with the enhanced inhomogeneity became unfavorable for the generation of chorus, and the quenching of chorus directly caused the disappea. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 52 - 61 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071987 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071987/full
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Authors: Chen Lunjin, Thorne Richard M, Bortnik Jacob, Li Wen, Horne Richard B, et al.
Title: Generation of Unusually Low Frequency Plasmaspheric Hiss
Abstract: It has been reported from Van Allen Probe observations that plasmaspheric hiss intensification in the outer plasmasphere, associated with a substorm injection on Sept 30 2012, occurred with a peak frequency near 100 Hz, well below the typical plasmaspheric hiss frequency range, extending down to ~20 Hz. We examine this event of unusually low frequency plasmaspheric hiss to understand its generation mechanism. Quantitative analysis is performed by simulating wave ray paths via the HOTRAY ray tracing code with measured plasma density and calculating ray path-integrated wave gain evaluated using the measured energetic electron distribution. We demonstrate that the growth rate due to substorm injected electrons is positive but rather weak, leading to small wave gain (~10 dB) during a sin. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060628 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL060628
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chorus modulation
Authors: Xia Zhiyang, Chen Lunjin, Dai Lei, Claudepierre Seth G., Chan Anthony A, et al.
Title: Modulation of chorus intensity by ULF waves deep in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that chorus wave intensity can be modulated by Pc4-Pc5 compressional ULF waves. In this study, we present Van Allen Probes observation of ULF wave modulating chorus wave intensity, which occurred deep in the magnetosphere. The ULF wave shows fundamental poloidal mode signature and mirror mode compressional nature. The observed ULF wave can modulate not only the chorus wave intensity but also the distribution of both protons and electrons. Linear growth rate analysis shows consistence with observed chorus intensity variation at low frequency (f <∼ 0.3fce), but cannot account for the observed higher-frequency chorus waves, including the upper band chorus waves. This suggests the chorus waves at higher-frequency ranges require nonlinear mechanisms. In addition, w. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL070280 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2016GL070280/full
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Chorus wave
Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Baker D N, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis
Abstract: Determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and . . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065342 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015GL065342/abstract
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Quantifying the relative contributions of substorm injections and chorus waves to the rapid outward extension of electron radiation belt
Abstract: We study the rapid outward extension of the electron radiation belt on a timescale of several hours during three events observed by RBSP and THEMIS satellites, and particularly quantify the contributions of substorm injections and chorus waves to the electron flux enhancement near the outer boundary of radiation belt. A comprehensive analysis including both observations and simulations is performed for the first event on 26 May 2013. The outer boundary of electron radiation belt moved from L = 5.5 to L > 6.07 over about 6 hours, with up to four orders of magnitude enhancement in the 30 keV-5 MeV electron fluxes at L = 6. The observations show that the substorm injection can cause 100% and 20% of the total subrelativistic (~0.1 MeV) and relativistic (2-5 MeV) electron . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020709 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020709
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chorus wave excitation
Authors: He Yihua, Xiao Fuliang, Zhou Qinghua, Yang Chang, Liu Si, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities
Abstract: We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst≈-45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst≈-18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 − 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1 − 0.5fce and a peak spectral density ∼[10−4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (∼ 10-300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation around bet. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021376 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021376
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chorus waves
Authors: Zhou Qinghua, Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Liu Si, He Yihua, et al.
Title: Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ∼300–1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10−5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhi. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4518 - 4529 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022366 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022366
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Authors: Matsui H., Torbert R B, Spence H E, Argall M. R., Alm L., et al.
Title: Relativistic electron increase during chorus wave activities on the 6-8 March 2016 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: There was a geomagnetic storm on 6–8 March 2016, in which Van Allen Probes A and B separated by ∼2.5 h measured increase of relativistic electrons with energies ∼ several hundred keV to 1 MeV. Simultaneously, chorus waves were measured by both Van Allen Probes and Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. Some of the chorus elements were rising-tones, possibly due to nonlinear effects. These measurements are compared with a nonlinear theory of chorus waves incorporating the inhomogeneity ratio and the field equation. From this theory, a chorus wave profile in time and one-dimensional space is simulated. Test particle calculations are then performed in order to examine the energization rate of electrons. Some electrons are accelerated, although more electrons are decelerated. The measu. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024540 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024540/full
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chorus-driven local acceleration
Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations
Abstract: Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak loca. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5520 - 5536 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v121.610.1002/2016JA022400 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022400
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CME
Authors: Kanekal S G, Baker D N, Henderson M G, Li W, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: Relativistic electron response to the combined magnetospheric impact of a coronal mass ejection overlapping with a high-speed stream: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth.We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both MagEIS and REPT instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establishes the behavior of lower energy (<1MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations du. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021395 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021395
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coronal mass ejections
Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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Cyclotron instability
Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss following interplanetary shock
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is one of the important plasma waves controlling radiation belt dynamics. Its spatiotemporal distribution and generation mechanism are presently the object of active research. We here give the first report on the shock-induced disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the Van Allen Probes on 8 October 2013. This special event exhibits the dramatic variability of plasmaspheric hiss and provides a good opportunity to test its generation mechanisms. The origination of plasmaspheric hiss from plasmatrough chorus is suggested to be an appropriate prerequisite to explain this event. The shock increased the suprathermal electron fluxes, and then the enhanced Landau damping promptly prevented chorus waves from entering the plasmasphere. Subsequently, the shrinking magnetop. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063906 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063906
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Cyclotron resonance
Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss following interplanetary shock
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is one of the important plasma waves controlling radiation belt dynamics. Its spatiotemporal distribution and generation mechanism are presently the object of active research. We here give the first report on the shock-induced disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the Van Allen Probes on 8 October 2013. This special event exhibits the dramatic variability of plasmaspheric hiss and provides a good opportunity to test its generation mechanisms. The origination of plasmaspheric hiss from plasmatrough chorus is suggested to be an appropriate prerequisite to explain this event. The shock increased the suprathermal electron fluxes, and then the enhanced Landau damping promptly prevented chorus waves from entering the plasmasphere. Subsequently, the shrinking magnetop. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063906 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063906
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Authors: Zhu Hui, Su Zhenpeng, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Plasmatrough exohiss waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Evidence for leakage from plasmasphere and resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Exohiss waves are whistler mode hiss observed in the plasmatrough region. We present a case study of exohiss waves and the corresponding background plasma distributions observed by the Van Allen Probes in the dayside low-latitude region. The analysis of wave Poynting fluxes, suprathermal electron fluxes and cold electron densities supports the scenario that exohiss leaks from the plasmasphere into the plasmatrough. Quasilinear calculations further reveal that exohiss can potentially cause the resonant scattering loss of radiation belt electrons ~Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062964 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062964
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Day-night asymmetrical variations of magnetic field
Authors: Yu J., Li L.Y., Cao J. B., Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probe in-situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 06:00 - 18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90o (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distrib. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069029
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Day-night asymmetrical variations of relativistic electron pitch angle distributions
Authors: Yu J., Li L.Y., Cao J. B., Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probe in-situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 06:00 - 18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90o (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distrib. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069029
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deep injections
Authors: Zhao H., Li X, Baker D N, Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: Ring current electron dynamics during geomagnetic storms based on the Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: Based on comprehensive measurements from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Mass Spectrometer Ion Spectrometer, Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment instruments on the Van Allen Probes, comparative studies of ring current electrons and ions are performed and the role of energetic electrons in the ring current dynamics is investigated. The deep injections of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently; after the injections the electrons decay slowly in the inner belt but protons in the low L region decay very fast. Intriguing similarities between lower energy protons and higher-energy electrons are also found. The evolution of ring current electron and ion energy densi. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 3333 - 3346 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022358 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022358
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Diffusion
Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Radial transport of radiation belt electrons in kinetic field-line resonances
Abstract: A representative case study from the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm recovery phase reveals enhanced electron fluxes at intermediate pitch angles over energies from ~100 keV to 5 MeV coincident with broadband low frequency electromagnetic waves. The statistical properties of these waves are used to build a model for radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonances in kinetic Alfvén eigenmodes/kinetic field-line resonances. Estimated diffusion coefficients indicate timescales for radial transport of the order of hours in storm-time events at energies from <100 keV to MeVs over equatorial pitch angles from the edge of the loss cone to nearly perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The correlation of kinetic resonances with electron depletions and enhancements during storm main phase. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074587 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074587/full
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Dipolarization
Authors: é M., Keika K, Kletzing C A, Spence H E, Smith C W, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of magnetic field dipolarization and its associated O + flux variations in the inner magnetosphere at L  < 6.6
Abstract: We investigate magnetic field dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere and its associated ion flux variations, using the magnetic field and energetic ion flux data acquired by the Van Allen Probes. From a study of 74 events that appeared at L = 4.5–6.6 between 1 October 2012 and 31 October 2013, we reveal the following characteristics of the dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere: (1) its timescale is approximately 5 min, (2) it is accompanied by strong magnetic fluctuations that have a dominant frequency close to the O+ gyrofrequency, (3) ion fluxes at 20–50 keV are simultaneously enhanced with larger magnitudes for O+ than for H+, (4) after a few minutes of the dipolarization, the flux enhancement at 0.1–5 keV appears with a clear energy-dispersion signature only for . . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022549 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022549
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drift resonance
Authors: Hartinger M. D., Claudepierre S G, Turner D. L., Reeves G D, Breneman A., et al.
Title: Diagnosis of ULF Wave-Particle Interactions With Megaelectron Volt Electrons: The Importance of Ultrahigh-Resolution Energy Channels
Abstract: Electron flux measurements are an important diagnostic for interactions between ultralow‐frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic (∼1 MeV) electrons. Since measurements are collected by particle detectors with finite energy channel width, they are affected by a phase mixing process that can obscure these interactions. We demonstrate that ultrahigh‐resolution electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer on the Van Allen Probes mission—obtained using a data product that improves the energy resolution by roughly an order of magnitude—are crucial for understanding ULF wave‐particle interactions. In particular, the ultrahigh‐resolution measurements reveal a range of complex dynamics that cannot be resolved by standard measurements. Furthermore, the standard meas. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080291 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080291
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Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Rankin R, Chen X. R., et al.
Title: Relativistic electron dynamics produced by azimuthally localized poloidal mode ULF waves: Boomerang-shaped pitch angle evolutions
Abstract: We present an analysis of “boomerang-shaped” pitch angle evolutions of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons observed by the Van Allen Probes after the passage of an interplanetary shock on June 7th, 2014. The flux at different pitch angles is modulated by Pc5 waves, with equatorially mirroring electrons reaching the satellite first. For 90∘ pitch angle electrons, the phase change of the flux modulations across energy exceeds 180∘, and increasingly tilts with time. Using estimates of the arrival time of particles of different pitch angles at the spacecraft location, a scenario is investigated in which shock-induced ULF waves interact with electrons through the drift resonance mechanism in a localized region westward of the spacecraft. Numerical calculations on particle energy. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074006 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074006/full
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Drift shell splitting
Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, Ma Q, et al.
Title: Physical mechanism causing rapid changes in ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distributions right after a shock arrival: Evaluation of an electron dropout event
Abstract: Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain relativistic electron flux depletions (dropouts) in the Earth's outer radiation belt during storm times: adiabatic expansion of electron drift shells due to a decrease in magnetic field strength, magnetopause shadowing and subsequent outward radial diffusion, and precipitation into the atmosphere (driven by EMIC wave scattering). Which mechanism predominates in causing electron dropouts commonly observed in the outer radiation belt is still debatable. In the present study, we evaluate the physical mechanism that may be primarily responsible for causing the sudden change in relativistic electron pitch angle distributions during a dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes during the main phase of the 27 February 2014 storm. During this event, t. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022517 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022517/abstract
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Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Fu S. Y., Rankin R, et al.
Title: Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ∼1MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or “dropout echoes”, constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a “drifting electron dropout” with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ∼1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons . . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069140 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069140h
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drift‐bounce resonance
Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Halford A J, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Pitch Angle Scattering and Loss of Radiation Belt Electrons in Broadband Electromagnetic Waves
Abstract: A magnetic conjunction between Van Allen Probes spacecraft and the Balloon Array for Radiation‐belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) reveals the simultaneous occurrence of broadband Alfvénic fluctuations and multi‐timescale modulation of enhanced atmospheric X‐ray bremsstrahlung emission. The properties of the Alfvénic fluctuations are used to build a model for pitch angle scattering in the outer radiation belt on electron gyro‐radii scale field structures. It is shown that this scattering may lead to the transport of electrons into the loss cone over an energy range from hundreds of keV to multi‐MeV on diffusive timescales on the order of hours. This process may account for modulation of atmospheric X‐ray fluxes observed from balloons and constitute a significant loss p. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL079527 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL079527
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dropouts
Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, Ma Q, et al.
Title: Physical mechanism causing rapid changes in ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distributions right after a shock arrival: Evaluation of an electron dropout event
Abstract: Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain relativistic electron flux depletions (dropouts) in the Earth's outer radiation belt during storm times: adiabatic expansion of electron drift shells due to a decrease in magnetic field strength, magnetopause shadowing and subsequent outward radial diffusion, and precipitation into the atmosphere (driven by EMIC wave scattering). Which mechanism predominates in causing electron dropouts commonly observed in the outer radiation belt is still debatable. In the present study, we evaluate the physical mechanism that may be primarily responsible for causing the sudden change in relativistic electron pitch angle distributions during a dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes during the main phase of the 27 February 2014 storm. During this event, t. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022517 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022517/abstract
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Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Morley S. K., Henderson M G, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: On the cause and extent of outer radiation belt losses during the 30 September 2012 dropout event
Abstract: On 30 September 2012, a flux “dropout” occurred throughout Earth's outer electron radiation belt during the main phase of a strong geomagnetic storm. Using eight spacecraft from NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes missions and NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites constellation, we examined the full extent and timescales of the dropout based on particle energy, equatorial pitch angle, radial distance, and species. We calculated phase space densities of relativistic electrons, in adiabatic invariant coordinates, which revealed that loss processes during the dropout were > 90% effective throughout the majority of the outer belt and the plasmapause played a key role in limiting the spatial extent . . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1530 - 1540 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019446 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019446
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ECH waves
Authors: Zhou Qinghua, Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Liu Si, He Yihua, et al.
Title: Generation of lower and upper bands of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves generated by the electron loss cone distribution can produce efficient scattering loss of plasma sheet electrons, which has a significant effect on the dynamics in the outer magnetosphere. Here we report two ECH emission events around the same location L≈ 5.7–5.8, MLT ≈ 12 from Van Allen Probes on 11 February (event A) and 9 January 2014 (event B), respectively. The spectrum of ECH waves was centered at the lower half of the harmonic bands during event A, but the upper half during event B. The observed electron phase space density in both events is fitted by the subtracted bi-Maxwellian distribution, and the fitting functions are used to evaluate the local growth rates of ECH waves based on a linear theory for homogeneous plasmas.. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073051 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073051/full
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ECT
Authors: Boyd A. J., Reeves G D, Spence H E, Funsten H O, Larsen B A, et al.
Title: RBSP‐ECT Combined Spin‐Averaged Electron Flux Data Product
Abstract: We describe a new data product combining the spin‐averaged electron flux measurements from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Energetic Particle Composition and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Van Allen Probes. We describe the methodology used to combine each of the data sets and produce a consistent set of spectra for September 2013 to the present. Three‐minute‐averaged flux spectra are provided spanning energies from 15 eV up to 20 MeV. This new data product provides additional utility to the ECT data and offers a consistent cross calibrated data set for researchers interested in examining the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere across a wide range of energies.
Date: 10/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026733 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026733
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Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves
Authors: Yu J., Li L.Y., Cao J. B., Yuan Z. G., Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Multiple loss processes of relativistic electrons outside the heart of outer radiation belt during a storm sudden commencement
Abstract: By examining the compression-induced changes in the electron phase space density and pitch angle distribution observed by two satellites of Van Allen Probes (RBSP-A/B), we find that the relativistic electrons (>2MeV) outside the heart of outer radiation belt (L*≥ 5) undergo multiple losses during a storm sudden commencement (SSC). The relativistic electron loss mainly occurs in the field-aligned direction (pitch angle α< 30° or >150°), and the flux decay of the field-aligned electrons is independent of the spatial location variations of the two satellites. However, the relativistic electrons in the pitch angle range of 30°-150° increase (decrease) with the decreasing (increasing) geocentric distance (|ΔL|< 0.25) of the RBSP-B (RBSP-A) location, and the electron fluxes in the quasi-. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021460 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021460http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021460
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electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves
Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Yue C., Thorne R M, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Ion Heating by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves and Magnetosonic Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and magnetosonic waves are commonly observed in the Earth's magnetosphere associated with enhanced ring current activity. Using wave and ion measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we identify clear correlations between the hydrogen‐ and helium‐band EMIC waves with the enhancement of trapped helium and oxygen ion fluxes, respectively. We calculate the diffusion coefficients of different ion species using quasi‐linear theory to understand the effects of resonant scattering by EMIC waves. Our calculations indicate that EMIC waves can cause pitch angle scattering loss of several keV to hundreds of keV ions, and heating of tens of eV to several keV helium and oxygen ions by hydrogen‐ and helium‐band EMIC waves, respectively. Moreover, we fou. . .
Date: 06/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6258 - 6267 DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083513 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL083513
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electron
Authors: Kanekal S G, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Jones A., Schiller Q., et al.
Title: Prompt acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to ultrarelativistic energies by the 17 March 2015 interplanetary shock
Abstract: Trapped electrons in Earth's outer Van Allen radiation belt are influenced profoundly by solar phenomena such as high-speed solar wind streams, coronal mass ejections (CME), and interplanetary (IP) shocks. In particular, strong IP shocks compress the magnetosphere suddenly and result in rapid energization of electrons within minutes. It is believed that the electric fields induced by the rapid change in the geomagnetic field are responsible for the energization. During the latter part of March 2015, a CME impact led to the most powerful geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = −223 nT at 17 March, 23 UT) observed not only during the Van Allen Probe era but also the entire preceding decade. Magnetospheric response in the outer radiation belt eventually resulted in elevated levels of energized ele. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7622 - 7635 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022596 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022596
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