Biblio

Found 9 results
Filters: Author is Fennell, J.  [Clear All Filters]
2018
Authors: Murphy Kyle R., Watt C. E. J., Mann Ian R., Rae Jonathan, Sibeck David G., et al.
Title: The global statistical response of the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: Using the total radiation belt electron content calculated from Van Allen Probe phase space density (PSD), the time‐dependent and global response of the outer radiation belt during storms is statistically studied. Using PSD reduces the impacts of adiabatic changes in the main phase, allowing a separation of adiabatic and non‐adiabatic effects, and revealing a clear modality and repeatable sequence of events in storm‐time radiation belt electron dynamics. This sequence exhibits an important first adiabatic invariant (μ) dependent behaviour in the seed (150 MeV/G), relativistic (1000 MeV/G), and ultra‐relativistic (4000 MeV/G) populations. The outer radiation belt statistically shows an initial phase dominated by loss followed by a second phase of rapid acceleration, whilst the seed. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL076674 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076674
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Authors: Ripoll ‐F., Loridan V., Denton M. H., Cunningham G., Reeves G., et al.
Title: Observations and Fokker‐Planck simulations of the L‐shell, energy, and pitch‐angle structure of Earth’s electron radiation belts during quiet times
Abstract: The evolution of the radiation belts in L‐shell (L), energy (E), and equatorial pitch‐angle (α0) is analyzed during the calm 11‐day interval (March 4 –March 15) following the March 1 storm 2013. Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) observations from Van Allen Probes are interpreted alongside 1D and 3D Fokker‐Planck simulations combined with consistent event‐driven scattering modeling from whistler mode hiss waves. Three (L, E, α0)‐regions persist through 11 days of hiss wave scattering; the pitch‐angle dependent inner belt core (L~<2.2 and E<700 keV), pitch‐angle homogeneous outer belt low‐energy core (L>~5 and E~<100 keV), and a distinct pocket of electrons (L~[4.5, 5.5] and E~[0.7, 2] MeV). The pitch‐angle homogeneous outer belt is explained by the diff. . .
Date: 12/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026111 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026111
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2017
Authors: Cattell C., Breneman A., Colpitts C., Dombeck J., Thaller S., et al.
Title: Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES-13
Abstract: Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (~8 Re) and Van Allen Probes (~5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double-peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated ExB flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by MMS, with a speed that is comparable to the ExB flow. The magnetopause speed and the ExB speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES-13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074895 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074895/full
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2015
Authors: Breneman A. W., Halford A., Millan R., McCarthy M., Fennell J, et al.
Title: Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss
Abstract: Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii1, 2, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss3, 4, 5. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its ‘quiet’ pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electr. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Nature Pages: 193 - 195 DOI: 10.1038/nature14515 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature14515
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Authors: Li X, Selesnick R. S., Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron Intensity
Abstract: No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (10s of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable, thus for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because of their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020777 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020777
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2014
Authors: Ripoll J.-F., Chen Y., Fennell J, and Friedel R
Title: On long decays of electrons in the vicinity of the slot region observed by HEO3
Abstract: Long decay periods of electron counts, which follow abrupt rises and last from weeks to months, have been observed by the HEO3 spacecraft in the vicinity of the slot region between the years 1998 and 2007. During the most stable decay periods as selected, e-folding timescales are extracted and statistically analyzed from observations as a function of L-shell and electron energy. A challenge is to reproduce the observed timescales from simulations of pitch angle diffusion by three acting waves–the plasmaspheric hiss, lightning-generated whistlers, and VLF transmitter waves. We perform full numerical simulations to accurately compute electron lifetimes. We choose to use the method and wave parameters proposed by Abel & Thorne [1998] with the goal to assess whether they can reproduce lifeti. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020449 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020449
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2013
Authors: Dai L, Takahashi K, Wygant J R, Chen L, Bonnell J W, et al.
Title: Excitation of Poloidal standing Alfven waves through the drift resonance wave-particle interaction
Abstract: Drift-resonance wave-particle interaction is a fundamental collisionless plasma process studied extensively in theory. Using cross-spectral analysis of electric field, magnetic field, and ion flux data from the Van Allen Probe (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) spacecraft, we present direct evidence identifying the generation of a fundamental mode standing poloidal wave through drift-resonance interactions in the inner magnetosphere. Intense azimuthal electric field (Eφ) oscillations as large as 10mV/m are observed, associated with radial magnetic field (Br) oscillations in the dawn-noon sector near but south of the magnetic equator at L∼5. The observed wave period, Eφ/Br ratio and the 90° phase lag between Br and Eφ are all consistent with fundamental mode standing Poloidal waves. Phase . . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/grl.50800 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50800/full
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Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
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2006
Authors: Shprits Y Y, Thorne R M, Friedel R, Reeves G D, Fennell J, et al.
Title: Outward radial diffusion driven by losses at magnetopause
Abstract: Loss mechanisms responsible for the sudden depletions of the outer electron radiation belt are examined based on observations and radial diffusion modeling, with L*-derived boundary conditions. SAMPEX data for October–December 2003 indicate that depletions often occur when the magnetopause is compressed and geomagnetic activity is high, consistent with outward radial diffusion for L* > 4 driven by loss to the magnetopause. Multichannel Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO) satellite observations show that depletions at higher L occur at energies as low as a few hundred keV, which excludes the possibility of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave-driven pitch angle scattering and loss to the atmosphere at L* > 4. We further examine the viability of the outward radial diffusion loss by comp. . .
Date: 11/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011657 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011657/abstract
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