Biblio

Found 7 results
Filters: Author is Huang, C.-L.  [Clear All Filters]
2018
Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Braun D. J., Li W, Ma Q, et al.
Title: EMIC wave events during the four GEM QARBM challenge intervals
Abstract: This paper presents observations of EMIC waves from multiple data sources during the four GEM challenge events in 2013 selected by the GEM “Quantitative Assessment of Radiation Belt Modeling” focus group: March 17‐18 (Stormtime Enhancement), May 31‐June 2 (Stormtime Dropout), September 19‐20 (Non‐storm Enhancement), and September 23‐25 (Non‐storm Dropout). Observations include EMIC wave data from the Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS spacecraft in the near‐equatorial magnetosphere and from several arrays of ground‐based search coil magnetometers worldwide, as well as localized ring current proton precipitation data from low‐altitude POES spacecraft. Each of these data sets provides only limited spatial coverage, but their combination shows consistent occurrence patte. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025505 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025505
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2016
Authors: Boyd A.J., Spence H.E., Huang C.-L., Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Statistical Properties of the Radiation Belt Seed Population
Abstract: We present a statistical analysis of phase space density data from the first 26 months of the Van Allen Probes mission. In particular we investigate the relationship between the 10s-100s keV seed electrons and >1 MeV core radiation belt electron population. Using a cross correlation analysis, we find that the seed and core populations are well correlated with a coefficient of ≈ 0.73 with a time lag of 10-15 hours. We present evidence of a seed population threshold that is necessary for subsequent acceleration. The depth of penetration of the seed population determines the inner boundary of the acceleration process. However, we show that an enhanced seed population alone is not enough to produce acceleration in the higher energies, implying that the seed population of 100s of keV electron. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022652 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022652
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Authors: Forsyth C., Rae I. J., Murphy K. R., Freeman M. P., Huang C.-L., et al.
Title: What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?
Abstract: Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV “seed” population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negat. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022620 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022620
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2015
Authors: Lugaz N., Farrugia C. J., Huang C.-L., and Spence H E
Title: Extreme geomagnetic disturbances due to shocks within CMEs
Abstract: We report on features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling elicited by shocks propagating through coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by analyzing the intense geomagnetic storm of 6 August 1998. During this event, the dynamic pressure enhancement at the shock combined with a simultaneous increase in the southward component of the magnetic field resulted in a large earthward retreat of Earth's magnetopause, which remained close to geosynchronous orbit for more than 4 h. This occurred despite the fact that both shock and CME were weak and relatively slow. Another similar example of a weak shock inside a slow CME resulting in an intense geomagnetic storm is the 30 September 2012 event, which strongly depleted the outer radiation belt. We discuss the potential of shocks inside CMEs to cause large . . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064530 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064530
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Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Wygant J R, Kletzing C A, Lessard M. R., et al.
Title: Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 hours in MLT
Abstract: Although most studies of the effects of EMIC waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on February 23, 2014 that extended over 8 hours in UT and over 12 hours in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. W. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021227 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021227
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2014
Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Morley S. K., Henderson M G, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: On the cause and extent of outer radiation belt losses during the 30 September 2012 dropout event
Abstract: On 30 September 2012, a flux “dropout” occurred throughout Earth's outer electron radiation belt during the main phase of a strong geomagnetic storm. Using eight spacecraft from NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes missions and NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites constellation, we examined the full extent and timescales of the dropout based on particle energy, equatorial pitch angle, radial distance, and species. We calculated phase space densities of relativistic electrons, in adiabatic invariant coordinates, which revealed that loss processes during the dropout were > 90% effective throughout the majority of the outer belt and the plasmapause played a key role in limiting the spatial extent . . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1530 - 1540 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019446 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019446
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Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Li W, Bortnik J, Ni B, et al.
Title: Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1960 - 1979 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2014JA019770 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019770
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