Biblio

Found 6 results
Filters: Author is Blum, L. W.  [Clear All Filters]
2013
Authors: Blum L. W., Schiller Q., Li X, Millan R., Halford A., et al.
Title: New conjunctive CubeSat and balloon measurements to quantify rapid energetic electron precipitation
Abstract: Relativistic electron precipitation into the atmosphere can contribute significant losses to the outer radiation belt. In particular, rapid narrow precipitation features termed precipitation bands have been hypothesized to be an integral contributor to relativistic electron precipitation loss, but quantification of their net effect is still needed. Here we investigate precipitation bands as measured at low earth orbit by the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat. Two precipitation bands of MeV electrons were observed on 18–19 January 2013, concurrent with precipitation seen by the 2013 Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign. The newly available conjugate measurements allow for a detailed estimate of the temporal and spatial fea. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 5833 - 5837 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058546 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058546
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2014
Authors: Jaynes A. N., Li X, Schiller Q. G., Blum L. W., Tu W., et al.
Title: Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during an extended quiescent period
Abstract: To effectively study steady loss due to hiss-driven precipitation of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt, it is useful to isolate this loss by studying a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a case of initial enhancement and slow, steady decay of 700 keV - 2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ~15 December 2012 - 13 January 2013. We incorporate particle measurements from a constellation of satellites, including the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft, and THEMIS, to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. Additional data from calculated phase space density (PSD), as well as hiss and chorus w. . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020125 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020125
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2015
Authors: Blum L. W., Halford A., Millan R., Bonnell J. W., Goldstein J, et al.
Title: Observations of coincident EMIC wave activity and duskside energetic electron precipitation on 18-19 January 2013
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been suggested to be a cause of radiation belt electron loss to the atmosphere. Here simultaneous, magnetically conjugate measurements are presented of EMIC wave activity, measured at geosynchronous orbit and on the ground, and energetic electron precipitation, seen by the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign, on two consecutive days in January 2013. Multiple bursts of precipitation were observed on the duskside of the magnetosphere at the end of 18 January and again late on 19 January, concurrent with particle injections, substorm activity, and enhanced magnetospheric convection. The structure, timing, and spatial extent of the waves are compared to those of the precipitation during both days to det. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065245 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL065245
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2016
Authors: Blum L. W., Agapitov O., Bonnell J. W., Kletzing C., and Wygant J
Title: EMIC wave spatial and coherence scales as determined from multipoint Van Allen Probe measurements
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can provide a strong source of energetic electron pitch angle scattering. These waves are often quite localized, thus their spatial extent can have a large effect on their overall scattering efficiency. Using measurements from the dual Van Allen Probes, we examine four EMIC wave events observed simultaneously on the two probes at varying spacecraft separations. Correlation of both the wave amplitude and phase observed at both spacecraft is examined to estimate the active region and coherence scales of the waves. We find well-correlated wave amplitude and amplitude modulation across distances spanning hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Phase coherence persisting 30–60 s is observable during close conjunction events but is lost as spacecraft s. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068799 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068799
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2017
Authors: Agapitov O., Blum L. W., Mozer F S, Bonnell J. W., and Wygant J
Title: Chorus whistler wave source scales as determined from multipoint Van Allen Probe measurements
Abstract: Whistler mode chorus waves are particularly important in outer radiation belt dynamics due to their key role in controlling the acceleration and scattering of electrons over a very wide energy range. The key parameters for both nonlinear and quasi-linear treatment of wave-particle interactions are the temporal and spatial scales of the wave source region and coherence of the wave field perturbations. Neither the source scale nor the coherence scale is well established experimentally, mostly because of a lack of multipoint VLF waveform measurements. We present an unprecedentedly long interval of coordinated VLF waveform measurements (sampled at 16384 s−1) aboard the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft—9 h (0800–1200 UT and 1700–2200 UT) during two consecutive apogees on 15 July . . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072701 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL072701
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Authors: Blum L. W., Bonnell J. W., Agapitov O., Paulson K., and Kletzing C.
Title: EMIC wave scale size in the inner magnetosphere: Observations from the dual Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Estimating the spatial scales of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is critical for quantifying their overall scattering efficiency and effects on thermal plasma, ring current, and radiation belt particles. Using measurements from the dual Van Allen Probes in 2013–2014, we characterize the spatial and temporal extents of regions of EMIC wave activity and how these depend on local time and radial distance within the inner magnetosphere. Observations are categorized into three types—waves observed by only one spacecraft, waves measured by both spacecraft simultaneously, and waves observed by both spacecraft with some time lag. Analysis reveals that dayside (and H+ band) EMIC waves more frequently span larger spatial areas, while nightside (and He+ band) waves are more often loc. . .
Date: 02/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1227 - 1233 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL072316 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL072316
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