Biblio

Found 5 results
Filters: Author is Halford, A.  [Clear All Filters]
2019
Authors: Bingley L., Angelopoulos V, Sibeck D., Zhang X., and Halford A.
Title: The Evolution of a Pitch‐Angle “Bite‐Out” Scattering Signature Caused by EMIC Wave Activity: A Case Study
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are understood to be one of the dominant drivers of relativistic electron loss from Earth's radiation belts. Theory predicts that the associated gyroresonant wave‐particle interaction results in a distinct energy‐dependent “bite‐out” signature in the normalized flux distribution of electrons as they are scattered into the loss cone. We identify such signatures along with the responsible EMIC waves captured in situ by the Van Allen Probes on 15–16 February 2017. Using the cold plasma approximation, we predict the pitch‐angle cutoffs for the scattering signature for the captured EMIC wave and find it in good agreement with the observed electron bite‐out scattering signature. Employing the close conjunction between the Van Allen Probe. . .
Date: 06/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026292 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026292
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2015
Authors: Breneman A. W., Halford A., Millan R., McCarthy M., Fennell J, et al.
Title: Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss
Abstract: Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii1, 2, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss3, 4, 5. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its ‘quiet’ pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electr. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Nature Pages: 193 - 195 DOI: 10.1038/nature14515 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature14515
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Authors: Blum L. W., Halford A., Millan R., Bonnell J. W., Goldstein J, et al.
Title: Observations of coincident EMIC wave activity and duskside energetic electron precipitation on 18-19 January 2013
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been suggested to be a cause of radiation belt electron loss to the atmosphere. Here simultaneous, magnetically conjugate measurements are presented of EMIC wave activity, measured at geosynchronous orbit and on the ground, and energetic electron precipitation, seen by the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign, on two consecutive days in January 2013. Multiple bursts of precipitation were observed on the duskside of the magnetosphere at the end of 18 January and again late on 19 January, concurrent with particle injections, substorm activity, and enhanced magnetospheric convection. The structure, timing, and spatial extent of the waves are compared to those of the precipitation during both days to det. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065245 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL065245
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Authors: Brito T, Hudson M K, Kress B., Paral J., Halford A., et al.
Title: Simulation of ULF wave modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the mHz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the BARREL balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies [e.g. Foat et al., 1998; Millan et al., 2002; Millan, 2011]. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible [Brito et al., 2012]. 3D simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate . . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020838 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020838
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2013
Authors: Blum L. W., Schiller Q., Li X, Millan R., Halford A., et al.
Title: New conjunctive CubeSat and balloon measurements to quantify rapid energetic electron precipitation
Abstract: Relativistic electron precipitation into the atmosphere can contribute significant losses to the outer radiation belt. In particular, rapid narrow precipitation features termed precipitation bands have been hypothesized to be an integral contributor to relativistic electron precipitation loss, but quantification of their net effect is still needed. Here we investigate precipitation bands as measured at low earth orbit by the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat. Two precipitation bands of MeV electrons were observed on 18–19 January 2013, concurrent with precipitation seen by the 2013 Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign. The newly available conjugate measurements allow for a detailed estimate of the temporal and spatial fea. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 5833 - 5837 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058546 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058546
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