Biblio

Found 14 results
Filters: Author is Baker, Daniel N.  [Clear All Filters]
2019
Authors: Omura Yoshiharu, Hsieh Yi‐Kai, Foster John C., Erickson Philip J., Kletzing Craig A., et al.
Title: Cyclotron Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons Through Landau Resonance With Obliquely Propagating Whistler‐Mode Chorus Emissions
Abstract: Efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons at Landau resonance with obliquely propagating whistler‐mode chorus emissions is confirmed by theory, simulation, and observation. The acceleration is due to the perpendicular component of the wave electric field. We first review theoretical analysis of nonlinear motion of resonant electrons interacting with obliquely propagating whistler‐mode chorus. We have derived formulae of inhomogeneity factors for Landau and cyclotron resonances to analyze nonlinear wave trapping of energetic electrons by an obliquely propagating chorus element. We performed test particle simulations to confirm that nonlinear wave trapping by both Landau and cyclotron resonances can take place for a wide range of energies. For an element of large amplitude chorus . . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026374 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026374
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Authors: Baker Daniel N, Hoxie Vaughn, Zhao Hong, Jaynes Allison N., Kanekal Shri, et al.
Title: Multiyear Measurements of Radiation Belt Electrons: Acceleration, Transport, and Loss
Abstract: In addition to clarifying morphological structures of the Earth's radiation belts, it has also been a major achievement of the Van Allen Probes mission to understand more thoroughly how highly relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons are accelerated deep inside the radiation belts. Prior studies have demonstrated that electrons up to energies of 10 megaelectron volts (MeV) can be produced over broad regions of the outer Van Allen zone on timescales of minutes to a few hours. It often is seen that geomagnetic activity driven by strong solar storms (i.e., coronal mass ejections, or CMEs) almost inexorably leads to relativistic electron production through the intermediary step of intense magnetospheric substorms. In this study, we report observations over the 6‐year period 1 September 2. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026259 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026259
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2018
Authors: Pinto Víctor A., Bortnik Jacob, Moya Pablo S., Lyons Larry R., Sibeck David G., et al.
Title: Characteristics, Occurrence and Decay Rates of Remnant Belts associated with Three-Belt events in the Earth's Radiation Belts
Abstract: Shortly after the launch of the Van Allen Probes, a new three‐belt configuration of the electron radiation belts was reported. Using data between September 2012 and November 2017, we have identified 30 three‐belt events and found that about 18% of geomagnetic storms result in such configuration. Based on the identified events, we evaluated some characteristics of the remnant (intermediate) belt. We determined the energy range of occurrence and found it peaks at E = 5.2 MeV. We also determined that the magnetopause location and SYM‐H value may play an important role in the outer belt losses that lead to formation and location of the remnant belt. Finally, we calculated the decay rates of the remnant belt for all events and found that their lifetime gets longer as energy increases,. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080274 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080274
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2017
Authors: Moya Pablo. S., Pinto íctor A., Sibeck David G., Kanekal Shrikanth G, and Baker Daniel N
Title: On the effect of geomagnetic storms on relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Using Van Allen Probes ECT-REPT observations we performed a statistical study on the effect of geomagnetic storms on relativistic electrons fluxes in the outer radiation belt for 78 storms between September 2012 and June 2016. We found that the probability of enhancement, depletion and no change in flux values depends strongly on L and energy. Enhancement events are more common for ∼ 2 MeV electrons at L ∼ 5, and the number of enhancement events decreases with increasing energy at any given L shell. However, considering the percentage of occurrence of each kind of event, enhancements are more probable at higher energies, and the probability of enhancement tends to increases with increasing L shell. Depletion are more probable for 4-5 MeV electrons at the heart of the outer radiation be. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024735 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024735/full
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Authors: Lanzerotti Louis J., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Space Weather Research: Earth's Radiation Belts
Abstract: Fundamental research on Earth's space radiation environment is essential for the design and the operations of modern technologies – for communications, weather, navigation, national security – that fly in the hostile space weather conditions above Earth's atmosphere. As the technologies become ever more advanced, more sophisticated understanding – and even predictability – of the environment is required for mission success
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2017SW001654 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001654/full
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Authors: Ozeke Louis G., Mann Ian R., Murphy Kyle R., Sibeck David G., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Ultra-relativistic radiation belt extinction and ULF wave radial diffusion: Modeling the September 2014 extended dropout event
Abstract: In September 2014 an unusually long-lasting (≳10 days) ultra-relativistic electron flux depletion occurred in the outer radiation belt despite ongoing solar wind forcing. We simulate this period using a ULF wave radial diffusion model, driven by observed ULF wave power coupled to flux variations at the outer boundary at L* = 5, including empirical electron loss models due to chorus and hiss wave scattering. Our results show that unexplained rapid main phase loss, that depletes the belt within hours, is essential to explain the observations. Such ultra-relativistic electron extinction decouples the prestorm and poststorm fluxes, revealing the subsequent belt dynamics to be surprisingly independent of prestorm flux. However, once this extinction is included, ULF wave transport and co. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072811 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL072811
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2016
Authors: Zhang Jichun, Halford Alexa J., Saikin Anthony A., Huang Chia-Lin, Spence Harlan E., et al.
Title: EMIC waves and associated relativistic electron precipitation on 25-26 January 2013
Abstract: Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes and the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL), we perform a case study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and associated relativistic electron precipitation (REP) observed on 25–26 January 2013. Among all the EMIC wave and REP events from the two missions, the pair of the events is the closest both in space and time. The Van Allen Probe-B detected significant EMIC waves at L = 2.1–3.9 and magnetic local time (MLT) = 21.0–23.4 for 53.5 min from 2353:00 UT, 25 January 2013. Meanwhile, BARREL-1T observed clear precipitation of relativistic electrons at L = 4.2–4.3 and MLT = 20.7–20.8 for 10.0 min from 2358 UT, 25 January 2013. Local plasma and field conditions for the excitation of the. . .
Date: 10/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022918 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022918/full
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Ni Binbin, Ma Qianli, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, et al.
Title: Formation of Energetic Electron Butterfly Distributions by Magnetosonic Waves via Landau Resonance
Abstract: Radiation belt electrons can exhibit different types of pitch angle distributions in response to various magnetospheric processes. Butterfly distributions, characterized by flux minima at pitch angles around 90°, are broadly observed in both the outer and inner belts and the slot region. Butterfly distributions close to the outer magnetospheric boundary have been attributed to drift shell splitting and losses to the magnetopause. However, their occurrence in the inner belt and the slot region has hitherto not been resolved. By analyzing the particle and wave data collected by the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm, we combine test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck simulations to reveal that scattering by equatorial magnetosonic waves is a significant cause for the formation. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL067853 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL067853http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL067853
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Authors: Morley Steven K., Sullivan John P., Henderson Michael G., Blake Bernard, and Baker Daniel N
Title: The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor: Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data
Abstract: Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse and multi-point studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross-calibration into two parts – one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation, and one that compares the energy spectra – we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra we use a combination of four distributions that, together. . .
Date: 02/2016 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2015SW001339 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015SW001339
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Bortnik Jacob, Thorne Richard M, Li Wen, Ma Qianli, et al.
Title: Ultrarelativistic electron butterfly distributions created by parallel acceleration due to magnetosonic waves
Abstract: The Van Allen Probe observations during the recovery phase of a large storm that occurred on 17 March 2015 showed that the ultrarelativistic electrons at the inner boundary of the outer radiation belt (L* = 2.6–3.7) exhibited butterfly pitch angle distributions, while the inner belt and the slot region also showed evidence of sub-MeV electron butterfly distributions. Strong magnetosonic waves were observed in the same regions and at the same time periods as these butterfly distributions. Moreover, when these magnetosonic waves extended to higher altitudes (L* = 4.1), the butterfly distributions also extended to the same region. Combining test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck diffusion simulations, we successfully reproduced the formation of the ultrarelativistic electron b. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 3212 - 3222 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022370 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022370
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2015
Authors: Dai Lei, Wang Chi, Duan Suping, He Zhaohai, Wygant John R., et al.
Title: Near-Earth Injection of MeV Electrons associated with Intense Dipolarization Electric Fields: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Substorms generally inject 10s-100s keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the pre-midnight sector at L∼5.5, Van Allen Probes (RBSP)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50mV/m) over ∼40s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the in. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064955 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064955
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Authors: Ni Binbin, Zou Zhengyang, Gu Xudong, Zhou Chen, Thorne Richard M, et al.
Title: Variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultra-relativistic electrons during and following intense geomagnetic storms: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Fifteen months of pitch angle resolved Van Allen Probes REPT measurements of differential electron flux are analyzed to investigate the characteristic variability of the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of radiation belt ultra-relativistic (>2 MeV) electrons during storm conditions and during the long-term post-storm decay. By modeling the ultra-relativistic electron pitch angle distribution as sinn α, where α is the equatorial pitch angle, we examine the spatio-temporal variations of the n-value. The results show that in general n-values increase with the level of geomagnetic activity. In principle, ultra-relativistic electrons respond to geomagnetic storms by becoming more peaked at 90° pitch angle with n-values of 2–3 as a supportive signature of chorus acceleration outside the pla. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021065 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021065
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2013
Authors: Shprits Yuri Y, Subbotin Dmitriy, Drozdov Alexander, Usanova Maria E., Kellerman Adam, et al.
Title: Unusual stable trapping of the ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Radiation in space was the first discovery of the space age. Earth’s radiation belts consist of energetic particles that are trapped by the geomagnetic field and encircle the planet1. The electron radiation belts usually form a two-zone structure with a stable inner zone and a highly variable outer zone, which forms and disappears owing to wave–particle interactions on the timescale of a day, and is strongly influenced by the very-low-frequency plasma waves. Recent observations revealed a third radiation zone at ultrarelativistic energies2, with the additional medium narrow belt (long-lived ring) persisting for approximately 4 weeks. This new ring resulted from a combination of electron losses to the interplanetary medium and scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves to the Ear. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Nature Physics Pages: 699 - 703 DOI: 10.1038/nphys2760 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys2760
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2005
Authors: Horne Richard B, Thorne Richard M, Shprits Yuri Y, Meredith Nigel P, Glauert Sarah A, et al.
Title: Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts1 are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity2, 3 and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space4, 5. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth6, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase . . .
Date: 09/2005 Publisher: Nature Pages: 227 - 230 DOI: 10.1038/nature03939 Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v437/n7056/full/nature03939.html
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