Biblio

Found 17 results
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2019
Authors: Goldstein J, De Pascuale S., and Kurth W S
Title: Epoch‐Based Model for Stormtime Plasmapause Location
Abstract: The output of a plasmapause test particle (PTP) code is used to formulate a new epoch‐based plasmapause model. The PTP simulation is run for an ensemble of 60 storms spanning 3 September 2012 to 28 September 2017 and having peak Dst of −60 nT or less, yielding over 7 million model plasmapause locations. Events are automatically identified and epoch times calculated relative to the respective storm peaks. Epoch analysis of the simulated plasmapause is demonstrated to be an effective method to reveal the dynamical phases of plume formation and evolution. The plasmapause radius is found to be strongly correlated with positive solar wind electric field. The epoch‐binned PTP data are used to create the first analytical model of the plasmapause that explicitly includes plumes. We obtain th. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025996 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025996
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2018
Authors: é M., Matsuoka A., Kumamoto A., Kasahara Y., Goldstein J, et al.
Title: Longitudinal Structure of Oxygen Torus in the Inner Magnetosphere: Simultaneous Observations by Arase and Van Allen Probe A
Abstract: Simultaneous observations of the magnetic field and plasma waves made by the Arase and Van Allen Probe A satellites at different magnetic local time (MLT) enable us to deduce the longitudinal structure of an oxygen torus for the first time. During 04:00–07:10 UT on 24 April 2017, Arase flew from L = 6.2 to 2.0 in the morning sector and detected an enhancement of the average plasma mass up to ~3.5 amu around L = 4.9–5.2 and MLT = 5.0 hr, implying that the plasma consists of approximately 15% O+ ions. Probe A moved outbound from L = 2.0 to 6.2 in the afternoon sector during 04:10–07:30 UT and observed no clear enhancements in the average plasma mass. For this event, the O+ density enhancement in the inner magnetosphere (i.e., oxygen torus) does not extend over all MLT but is skewed tow. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 10,177 - 10,184 DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080122 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080122
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Authors: De Pascuale S., Jordanova V K, Goldstein J, Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Simulations of Van Allen Probes Plasmaspheric Electron Density Observations
Abstract: We simulate equatorial plasmaspheric electron densities using a physics‐based model (Cold PLasma, CPL; used in the ring current‐atmosphere interactions model) of the source and loss processes of refilling and erosion driven by empirical inputs. The performance of CPL is evaluated against in situ measurements by the Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) for two events: the 31 May to 5 June and 15 to 20 January 2013 geomagnetic storms observed in the premidnight and postmidnight magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, respectively. Overall, CPL reproduces the radial extent of the plasmasphere to within a mean absolute difference of urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra54637:jgra54637-math-0001 L. The model electric field responsible for E × B convection and the parameterization of geomagn. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025776 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025776
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2017
Authors: Goldstein J, Angelopoulos V, De Pascuale S., Funsten H O, Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS
Abstract: We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside sout. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 368 - 392 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v122.110.1002/2016JA023173 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023173/full
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Authors: Allen R. C., Livi S. A., Vines S. K., Goldstein J, Cohen I., et al.
Title: Storm time empirical model of O + and O 6+ distributions in the magnetosphere
Abstract: Recent studies have utilized different charge states of oxygen ions as a tracer for the origins of plasma populations in the magnetosphere of Earth, using O+ as an indicator of ionospheric-originating plasma and O6+ as an indicator of solar wind-originating plasma. These studies have correlated enhancements in O6+ to various solar wind and geomagnetic conditions to characterize the dominant solar wind injection mechanisms into the magnetosphere but did not include analysis of the temporal evolution of these ions. A sixth-order Fourier expansion model based empirically on a superposed epoch analysis of geomagnetic storms observed by Polar is presented in this study to provide insight into the evolution of both ionospheric-originating and solar wind-originating plasma throughout geomagnetic . . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024245 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024245/full
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Authors: Genestreti K. J., Goldstein J, Corley G. D., Farner W., Kistler L. M., et al.
Title: Temperature of the plasmasphere from Van Allen Probes HOPE
Abstract: We introduce two novel techniques for estimating temperatures of very low energy space plasmas using, primarily, in situ data from an electrostatic analyzer mounted on a charged and moving spacecraft. The techniques are used to estimate proton temperatures during intervals where the bulk of the ion plasma is well below the energy bandpass of the analyzer. Both techniques assume that the plasma may be described by a one-dimensional math formula drifting Maxwellian and that the potential field and motion of the spacecraft may be accounted for in the simplest possible manner, i.e., by a linear shift of coordinates. The first technique involves the application of a constrained theoretical fit to a measured distribution function. The second technique involves the comparison of total and partial. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 310 - 323 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v122.110.1002/2016JA023047 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023047/full
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Authors: Jahn J -M, Goldstein J, Reeves G D, Fernandes P. A., Skoug R M, et al.
Title: The Warm Plasma Composition in the Inner Magnetosphere during 2012-2015
Abstract: Ionospheric heavy ions play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's magnetosphere. The greater mass and gyro radius of ionospheric oxygen differentiates its behavior from protons at the same energies. Oxygen may have an impact on tail reconnection processes, and it can at least temporarily dominate the energy content of the ring current during geomagnetic storms. At sub-keV energies, multi-species ion populations in the inner magnetosphere form the warm plasma cloak, occupying the energy range between the plasmasphere and the ring current. Lastly, cold lighter ions from the mid-latitude ionosphere create the co-rotating plasmasphere whose outer regions can interact with the plasma cloak, plasma sheet, ring current, and outer electron belt. In this paper we present a statistical view o. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024183 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024183/full
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2016
Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations
Abstract: Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak loca. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5520 - 5536 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v121.610.1002/2016JA022400 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022400
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Authors: Goldstein J, Baker D N, Blake J B, De Pascuale S., Funsten H O, et al.
Title: The relationship between the plasmapause and outer belt electrons
Abstract: We quantify the spatial relationship between the plasmapause and outer belt electrons for a 5 day period, 15–20 January 2013, by comparing locations of relativistic electron flux peaks to the plasmapause. A peak-finding algorithm is applied to 1.8–7.7 MeV relativistic electron flux data. A plasmapause gradient finder is applied to wave-derived electron number densities >10 cm−3. We identify two outer belts. Outer belt 1 is a stable zone of >3 MeV electrons located 1–2 RE inside the plasmapause. Outer belt 2 is a dynamic zone of <3 MeV electrons within 0.5 RE of the moving plasmapause. Electron fluxes earthward of each belt's peak are anticorrelated with cold plasma density. Belt 1 decayed on hiss timescales prior to a disturbance on 17 January and suffered only a modest dropout, pe. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023046 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023046
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2015
Authors: Valek P. W., Goldstein J, Jahn J -M, McComas D J, and Spence H E
Title: First joint in situ and global observations of the medium-energy oxygen and hydrogen in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We present the first simultaneous observations of the in situ ions and global Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images of the composition-separated, medium-energy (~1–50 keV) particle populations of the inner magnetosphere. The ENA emissions are mapped into L shell/magnetic local time space based on the exospheric density along the line of sight (LOS). The ENA measurement can then be scaled to determine an average ion flux along a given LOS. The in situ ion flux tends to be larger than the scaled ENAs at the same local time. This indicates that the ion population is more concentrated in the Van Allen Probes orbital plane than distributed along the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers LOS. For the large storm of 14 November 2012, we observe that the concentration of O (in situ i. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7615 - 7628 DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021151 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021151http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021151
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Authors: Breneman A. W., Halford A., Millan R., McCarthy M., Fennell J, et al.
Title: Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss
Abstract: Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii1, 2, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss3, 4, 5. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its ‘quiet’ pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electr. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Nature Pages: 193 - 195 DOI: 10.1038/nature14515 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature14515
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Authors: Blum L. W., Halford A., Millan R., Bonnell J. W., Goldstein J, et al.
Title: Observations of coincident EMIC wave activity and duskside energetic electron precipitation on 18-19 January 2013
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been suggested to be a cause of radiation belt electron loss to the atmosphere. Here simultaneous, magnetically conjugate measurements are presented of EMIC wave activity, measured at geosynchronous orbit and on the ground, and energetic electron precipitation, seen by the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign, on two consecutive days in January 2013. Multiple bursts of precipitation were observed on the duskside of the magnetosphere at the end of 18 January and again late on 19 January, concurrent with particle injections, substorm activity, and enhanced magnetospheric convection. The structure, timing, and spatial extent of the waves are compared to those of the precipitation during both days to det. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065245 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL065245
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2014
Authors: Hudson M K, Baker D N, Goldstein J, Kress B T, Paral J., et al.
Title: Simulated magnetopause losses and Van Allen Probe flux dropouts
Abstract: Three radiation belt flux dropout events seen by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope soon after launch of the Van Allen Probes in 2012 (Baker et al., 2013a) have been simulated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD code coupled to the Rice Convection Model, driven by measured upstream solar wind parameters. MHD results show inward motion of the magnetopause for each event, along with enhanced ULF wave power affecting radial transport. Test particle simulations of electron response on 8 October, prior to the strong flux enhancement on 9 October, provide evidence for loss due to magnetopause shadowing, both in energy and pitch angle dependence. Severe plasmapause erosion occurred during ~ 14 h of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz beginning 8 October coincident with. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1113 - 1118 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059222 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059222
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Authors: Goldstein J, De Pascuale S., Kletzing C., Kurth W., Genestreti K. J., et al.
Title: Simulation of Van Allen Probes Plasmapause Encounters
Abstract: We use an E × B-driven plasmapause test particle (PTP) simulation to provide global contextual information for in situ measurements by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) during 15–20 January 2013. During 120 h of simulation time beginning on 15 January, geomagnetic activity produced three plumes. The third and largest simulated plume formed during enhanced convection on 17 January, and survived as a rotating, wrapped, residual plume for tens of hours. To validate the simulation, we compare its output with RBSP data. Virtual RBSP satellites recorded 28 virtual plasmapause encounters during 15–19 January. For 26 of 28 (92%) virtual crossings, there were corresponding actual RBSP encounters with plasmapause density gradients. The mean difference in encounter time between model and data is. . .
Date: 09/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020252 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020252
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2013
Authors: Baker D N, Kanekal S G, Hoxie V C, Henderson M G, Li X, et al.
Title: A Long-Lived Relativistic Electron Storage Ring Embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen Belt
Abstract: Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unc. . .
Date: 04/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 186-190 DOI: 10.1126/science.1233518 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6129/186
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Authors: Spence H E, Reeves G D, Baker D N, Blake J B, Bolton M, et al.
Title: Science Goals and Overview of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite on NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Mission
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)-Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite contains an innovative complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere and radiation belts. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state-of-the-art theory and modeling, are necessary for understanding the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA’s Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) senso. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 311-336 DOI: DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-0007-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-0007-5
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2004
Authors: Baker D N, Kanekal S G, Li X, Monk S P, Goldstein J, et al.
Title: An extreme distortion of the Van Allen belt arising from the ‘Hallowe’en’ solar storm in 2003
Abstract: The Earth's radiation belts—also known as the Van Allen belts1—contain high-energy electrons trapped on magnetic field lines2, 3. The centre of the outer belt is usually 20,000–25,000 km from Earth. The region between the belts is normally devoid of particles2, 3, 4, and is accordingly favoured as a location for spacecraft operation because of the benign environment5. Here we report that the outer Van Allen belt was compressed dramatically by a solar storm known as the ‘Hallowe'en storm’ of 2003. From 1 to 10 November, the outer belt had its centre only ~10,000 km from Earth's equatorial surface, and the plasmasphere was similarly displaced inwards. The region between the belts became the location of high particle radiation intensity. This remarkable deformation of the entire. . .
Date: 12/2004 Publisher: Nature Pages: 878 - 881 DOI: 10.1038/nature03116 Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7019/full/nature03116.html
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