Biblio

Found 9 results
Filters: Keyword is interplanetary shock  [Clear All Filters]
2018
Authors: Takahashi Kazue, Lysak Robert, Vellante Massimo, Kletzing Craig A., Hartinger Michael D., et al.
Title: Observation and Numerical Simulation of Cavity Mode Oscillations Excited by an Interplanetary Shock
Abstract: Cavity mode oscillations (CMOs) are basic magnetohydrodynamic eigenmodes in the magnetosphere predicted by theory and are expected to occur following the arrival of an interplanetary shock. However, observational studies of shock-induced CMOs have been sparse. We present a case study of a dayside ultra-low-frequency (ULF) wave event that exhibited CMO properties. The event occurred immediately following the arrival of an interplanetary shock at 0829 UT on 15 August 2015. The shock was observed in the solar wind by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms-B and -C spacecraft, and magnetospheric ULF waves were observed by multiple spacecraft including the Van Allen Probes-A and -B spacecraft, which were located in the dayside plasmasphere at L∼ 1.4 and L∼ 2. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024639 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024639/full
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Authors: Zhang Dianjun, Liu Wenlong, Li Xinlin, Sarris Theodore, Xiao Chao, et al.
Title: Observations of impulsive electric fields induced by Interplanetary Shock
Abstract: We investigate the characteristics of impulsive electric fields in Earth's magnetosphere, as measured by the Van Allen Probes, in association with interplanetary shocks, as measured by ACE and Wind spacecraft in the solar wind from January 2013 to July 2016. It is shown that electric field impulses are mainly induced by global compressions by the shocks, mostly in the azimuthal direction and the amplitudes of the initial electric field impulses are positively correlated with the rate of increase of dynamic pressure across the shock in the dayside. It is also shown that the temporal profile of the impulse is related to the temporal profile of the solar wind dynamic pressure, Pd. It is suggested that during the first period of the impulse the evolution of the electric field is directly contr. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078809 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL078809
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2017
Authors: Cattell C., Breneman A., Colpitts C., Dombeck J., Thaller S., et al.
Title: Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES-13
Abstract: Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (~8 Re) and Van Allen Probes (~5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double-peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated ExB flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by MMS, with a speed that is comparable to the ExB flow. The magnetopause speed and the ExB speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES-13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074895 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074895/full
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Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Rankin R, Chen X. R., et al.
Title: Relativistic electron dynamics produced by azimuthally localized poloidal mode ULF waves: Boomerang-shaped pitch angle evolutions
Abstract: We present an analysis of “boomerang-shaped” pitch angle evolutions of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons observed by the Van Allen Probes after the passage of an interplanetary shock on June 7th, 2014. The flux at different pitch angles is modulated by Pc5 waves, with equatorially mirroring electrons reaching the satellite first. For 90∘ pitch angle electrons, the phase change of the flux modulations across energy exceeds 180∘, and increasingly tilts with time. Using estimates of the arrival time of particles of different pitch angles at the spacecraft location, a scenario is investigated in which shock-induced ULF waves interact with electrons through the drift resonance mechanism in a localized region westward of the spacecraft. Numerical calculations on particle energy. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074006 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074006/full
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Authors: Liu Nigang, Su Zhenpeng, Gao Zhonglei, Reeves G D, Zheng Huinan, et al.
Title: Shock-induced disappearance and subsequent recovery of plasmaspheric hiss: Coordinated observations of RBSP, THEMIS and POES satellites
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is an extremely low frequency whistler-mode emission contributing significantly to the loss of radiation belt electrons. There are two main competing mechanisms for the generation of plasmaspheric hiss: excitation by local instability in the outer plasmasphere and origination from chorus outside the plasmasphere. Here, on the basis of the analysis of an event of shock-induced disappearance and subsequent recovery of plasmaspheric hiss observed by RBSP, THEMIS and POES missions, we attempt to identify its dominant generation mechanism. In the pre-shock plasmasphere, the local electron instability was relatively weak and the hiss waves with bidirectional Poynting fluxes mainly originated from the dayside chorus waves. On arrival of the shock, the removal of pre-existing da. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024470 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024470/full
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2016
Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Fu S. Y., Rankin R, et al.
Title: Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ∼1MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or “dropout echoes”, constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a “drifting electron dropout” with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ∼1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons . . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069140 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069140h
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2015
Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss following interplanetary shock
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is one of the important plasma waves controlling radiation belt dynamics. Its spatiotemporal distribution and generation mechanism are presently the object of active research. We here give the first report on the shock-induced disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the Van Allen Probes on 8 October 2013. This special event exhibits the dramatic variability of plasmaspheric hiss and provides a good opportunity to test its generation mechanisms. The origination of plasmaspheric hiss from plasmatrough chorus is suggested to be an appropriate prerequisite to explain this event. The shock increased the suprathermal electron fluxes, and then the enhanced Landau damping promptly prevented chorus waves from entering the plasmasphere. Subsequently, the shrinking magnetop. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063906 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063906
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Authors: Malaspina David M., Claudepierre Seth G., Takahashi Kazue, Jaynes Allison N., Elkington Scot R, et al.
Title: Kinetic Alfvén Waves and Particle Response Associated with a Shock-Induced, Global ULF Perturbation of the Terrestrial Magnetosphere
Abstract: On 2 October 2013, the arrival of an interplanetary shock compressed the Earth's magnetosphere and triggered a global ULF (ultra low frequency) oscillation. The Van Allen Probe B spacecraft observed this large-amplitude ULF wave in situ with both magnetic and electric field data. Broadband waves up to approximately 100 Hz were observed in conjunction with, and modulated by, this ULF wave. Detailed analysis of fields and particle data reveals that these broadband waves are Doppler-shifted kinetic Alfvén waves. This event suggests that magnetospheric compression by interplanetary shocks can induce abrupt generation of kinetic Alfvén waves over large portions of the inner magnetosphere, potentially driving previously unconsidered wave-particle interactions throughout the inner magnetosphere. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065935 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL065935http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015GL065935
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2014
Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Wang Y. F., Zhou X.-Z., Zhang Hui, et al.
Title: Interactions of energetic electrons with ULF waves triggered by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations in the magnetotail
Abstract: We present in situ observations of a shock-induced substorm-like event on 13 April 2013 observed by the newly launched Van Allen twin probes. Substorm-like electron injections with energy of 30–500 keV were observed in the region from L∼5.2 to 5.5 immediately after the shock arrival (followed by energetic electron drift echoes). Meanwhile, the electron flux was clearly and strongly varying on the ULF wave time scale. It is found that both toroidal and poloidal mode ULF waves with a period of 150 s emerged following the magnetotail magnetic field reconfiguration after the interplanetary (IP) shock passage. The poloidal mode is more intense than the toroidal mode. The 90° phase shift between the poloidal mode Br and Ea suggests the standing poloidal waves in the Northern Hemisphere. F. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020023 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020023
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