Biblio

Found 4 results
Filters: Keyword is electron losses  [Clear All Filters]
2017
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, Artemyev A. V., Krasnoselskikh V. V., et al.
Title: Diffusive scattering of electrons by electron holes around injection fronts
Abstract: Van Allen Probes have detected nonlinear electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes include electron holes (EH), double layers, and more complicated solitary waves. We show that EHs can efficiently scatter electrons due to their substantial transverse electric fields. Although the electron scattering driven by EHs is diffusive, it cannot be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory. We derive analytical formulas describing local electron scattering by a single EH and verify them via test particle simulations. We show that the most efficiently scattered are gyroresonant electrons (crossing EH on a time scale comparable to the local electron gyroperiod). We compute bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the . . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023337 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023337/full
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2016
Authors: Ripoll J. F., Reeves G., Cunningham G., Loridan V., Denton M., et al.
Title: Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model
Abstract: We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt " slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the March 1st storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally-resolved whistler mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L-shells (2 to 6) including (a) the strong energy-dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L-shells at lower energies and (c) an " S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial tran. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068869 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068869
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2014
Authors: Kersten Tobias, Horne Richard B, Glauert Sarah A, Meredith Nigel P, Fraser Brian J., et al.
Title: Electron losses from the radiation belts caused by EMIC waves
Abstract: Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves cause electron loss in the radiation belts by resonating with high-energy electrons at energies greater than about 500 keV. However, their effectiveness has not been fully quantified. Here we determine the effectiveness of EMIC waves by using wave data from the fluxgate magnetometer on CRRES to calculate bounce-averaged pitch angle and energy diffusion rates for L*=3.5–7 for five levels of Kp between 12 and 18 MLT. To determine the electron loss, EMIC diffusion rates were included in the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt Model together with whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and radial diffusion. By simulating a 100 day period in 1990, we show that EMIC waves caused a significant reduction in the electron flux for energies greater t. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020366 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020366
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Authors: Boynton R. J., Balikhin M. A., and Mourenas D.
Title: Statistical analysis of electron lifetimes at GEO: Comparisons with chorus-driven losses
Abstract: The population of electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt increases when the magnetosphere is exposed to high-speed streams of solar wind, coronal mass ejections, magnetic clouds, or other disturbances. After this increase, the number of electrons decays back to approximately the initial population. This study statistically analyzes the lifetimes of the electron at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) from Los Alamos National Laboratory electron flux data. The decay rate of the electron fluxes are calculated for 14 energies ranging from 24 keV to 3.5 MeV to identify a relationship between the lifetime and energy of the electrons. The statistical data show that electron lifetimes increase with energy. Also, the statistical results show a good agreement up to ∼1 MeV with an analytical mod. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 6356 - 6366 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA019920 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019920
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