Biblio

Found 22 results
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2019
Authors: Ozeke L. G., Mann I. R., Claudepierre S G, Henderson M., Morley S. K., et al.
Title: The March 2015 Superstorm Revisited: Phase Space Density Profiles and Fast ULF Wave Diffusive Transport
Abstract: We present the temporal evolution of electron Phase Space Density (PSD) in the outer radiation belt during the intense March 2015 geomagnetic storm. Comparing observed PSD profiles as a function of L* at fixed first, M, and second, K, adiabatic invariants with those produced by simulations is critical for determining the physical processes responsible for the outer radiation belt dynamics. Here we show that the bulk of the accelerated and enhanced outer radiation belt population consists of electrons with K < 0.17 G1/2Re. For these electrons, the observed PSD versus L* profiles during the recovery phase of the storm have a positive radial gradient. We compare the observed temporal evolution of the PSD profiles during the recovery phase with those produced by radial diffusion simulations dr. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026326 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026326
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2018
Authors: Jaynes A. N., Ali A. F., Elkington S R, Malaspina D. M., Baker D N, et al.
Title: Fast diffusion of ultra-relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt: 17 March 2015 storm event
Abstract: Inward radial diffusion driven by ULF waves has long been known to be capable of accelerating radiation belt electrons to very high energies within the heart of the belts, but more recent work has shown that radial diffusion values can be highly event‐specific and mean values or empirical models may not capture the full significance of radial diffusion to acceleration events. Here we present an event of fast inward radial diffusion, occurring during a period following the geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. Ultra‐relativistic electrons up to ∼8 MeV are accelerated in the absence of intense higher‐frequency plasma waves, indicating an acceleration event in the core of the outer belt driven primarily or entirely by ULF wave‐driven diffusion. We examine this fast diffusion rate alon. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL079786 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL079786
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Authors: Liu Si, Yan Qi, Yang Chang, Zhou Qinghua, He Zhaoguo, et al.
Title: Quantifying Extremely Rapid Flux Enhancements of Radiation Belt Relativistic Electrons Associated With Radial Diffusion
Abstract: Previous studies have revealed a typical picture that seed electrons are transported inward under the drive of radial diffusion and then accelerated via chorus to relativistic energies. Here we show a potentially different process during the 2–3 October 2013 storm when Van Allen Probes observed extremely rapid (by about 50 times in 2 h) flux enhancements of relativistic (1.8–3.4 MeV) electrons but without distinct chorus at lower L-shells. Meanwhile, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites simultaneously measured enhanced chorus and fluxes of energetic (∼100–300 keV) seed electrons at higher L-shells. Numerical calculations show that chorus can efficiently accelerate seed electrons at L ∼ 8.3. Then radial diffusion further increased the phas. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1262 - 1270 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v45.310.1002/2017GL076513 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076513/full
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Chu X., et al.
Title: Quantitative Evaluation of Radial Diffusion and Local Acceleration Processes During GEM Challenge Events
Abstract: We simulate the radiation belt electron flux enhancements during selected Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) challenge events to quantitatively compare the major processes involved in relativistic electron acceleration under different conditions. Van Allen Probes observed significant electron flux enhancement during both the storm time of 17–18 March 2013 and non–storm time of 19–20 September 2013, but the distributions of plasma waves and energetic electrons for the two events were dramatically different. During 17–18 March 2013, the SYM‐H minimum reached −130 nT, intense chorus waves (peak Bw ~140 pT) occurred at 3.5 < L < 5.5, and several hundred keV to several MeV electron fluxes increased by ~2 orders of magnitude mostly at 3.5 < L < 5.5. During 19–20 September 2013, th. . .
Date: 03/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA025114 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JA025114
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Authors: Xiang Zheng, Tu Weichao, Ni Binbin, Henderson M G, and Cao Xing
Title: A Statistical Survey of Radiation Belt Dropouts Observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: A statistical analysis on the radiation belt dropouts is performed based on 4 years of electron phase space density data from the Van Allen Probes. The μ, K, and L* dependence of dropouts and their driving mechanisms and geomagnetic and solar wind conditions are investigated using electron phase space density data sets for the first time. Our results suggest that electronmagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering is the dominant dropout mechanism at low L* region, which requires the most active geomagnetic and solar wind conditions. In contrast, dropouts at high L* have a higher occurrence and are due to a combination of EMIC wave scattering and outward radial diffusion associated with magnetopause shadowing. In addition, outward radial diffusion at high L* is found to cause larger dro. . .
Date: 08/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078907 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL078907
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2017
Authors: Drozdov A. Y., Shprits Y Y, Aseev N. A., Kellerman A. C., and Reeves G D
Title: Dependence of radiation belt simulations to assumed radial diffusion rates tested for two empirical models of radial transport
Abstract: Radial diffusion is one of the dominant physical mechanisms that drives acceleration and loss of the radiation belt electrons, which makes it very important for nowcasting and forecasting space weather models. We investigate the sensitivity of the two parameterizations of the radial diffusion of Brautigam and Albert (2000) and Ozeke et al. (2014) on long-term radiation belt modeling using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB). Following Brautigam and Albert (2000) and Ozeke et al. (2014), we first perform 1-D radial diffusion simulations. Comparison of the simulation results with observations shows that the difference between simulations with either radial diffusion parameterization is small. To take into account effects of local acceleration and loss, we perform 3-D simulations, in. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Space Weather Pages: 150 - 162 DOI: 10.1002/swe.v15.110.1002/2016SW001426 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016SW001426/full
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Gao Zhonglei, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, Wang Shui, et al.
Title: Rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons by EMIC waves
Abstract: How relativistic electrons are lost is an important question surrounding the complex dynamics of the Earth's outer radiation belt. Radial loss to the magnetopause and local loss to the atmosphere are two main competing paradigms. Here, on the basis of the analysis of a radiation belt storm event on 27 February 2014, we present new evidence for the EMIC wave-driven local precipitation loss of relativistic electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt. During the main phase of this storm, the radial profile of relativistic electron phase space density was quasi-monotonic, qualitatively inconsistent with the prediction of radial loss theory. The local loss at low L-shells was required to prevent the development of phase space density peak resulting from the radial loss process at high L-. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024169 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024169/full
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Authors: Sarris Theodore E., Li Xinlin, Temerin Michael, Zhao Hong, Califf Sam, et al.
Title: On the Relationship Between Electron Flux Oscillations and ULF Wave-Driven Radial Transport
Abstract: The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the levels of electron flux oscillations and radial diffusion for different Phase Space Density (PSD) gradients, through observation and particle tracing simulations under the effect of model Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) fluctuations. This investigation aims to demonstrate that electron flux oscillation is associated with and could be used as an indicator of ongoing radial diffusion. To this direction, flux oscillations are observed through the Van Allen Probes’ MagEIS energetic particle detector; subsequently, flux oscillations are produced in a particle tracing model that simulates radial diffusion by using model magnetic and electric field fluctuations that are approximating measured magnetic and electric field fluctu. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023741 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023741/full
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Patel Maulik, Wiltberger Michael, Boyd Alex, et al.
Title: ULF Wave Analysis and Radial Diffusion Calculation Using a Global MHD Model for the 17 March 2013 and 2015 Storms
Abstract: The 17 March 2015 St. Patrick's Day Storm is the largest geomagnetic storm to date of Solar Cycle 24, with a Dst of -223 nT. The magnetopause moved inside geosynchronous orbit under high solar wind dynamic pressure and strong southward IMF Bz causing loss, however a subsequent drop in pressure allowed for rapid rebuilding of the radiation belts. The 17 March 2013 storm also shows similar effects on outer zone electrons: first a rapid dropout due to inward motion of the magnetopause followed by rapid increase in flux above the pre-storm level early in the recovery phase and a slow increase over the next 12 days. These phases can be seen in temporal evolution of the electron phase space density measured by the ECT instruments on Van Allen Probes. Using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD m. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023846 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023846/full
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Authors: Ozeke Louis G., Mann Ian R., Murphy Kyle R., Sibeck David G., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Ultra-relativistic radiation belt extinction and ULF wave radial diffusion: Modeling the September 2014 extended dropout event
Abstract: In September 2014 an unusually long-lasting (≳10 days) ultra-relativistic electron flux depletion occurred in the outer radiation belt despite ongoing solar wind forcing. We simulate this period using a ULF wave radial diffusion model, driven by observed ULF wave power coupled to flux variations at the outer boundary at L* = 5, including empirical electron loss models due to chorus and hiss wave scattering. Our results show that unexplained rapid main phase loss, that depletes the belt within hours, is essential to explain the observations. Such ultra-relativistic electron extinction decouples the prestorm and poststorm fluxes, revealing the subsequent belt dynamics to be surprisingly independent of prestorm flux. However, once this extinction is included, ULF wave transport and co. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072811 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL072811
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2016
Authors: Ali Ashar F., Malaspina David M., Elkington Scot R, Jaynes Allison N., Chan Anthony A, et al.
Title: Electric and Magnetic Radial Diffusion Coefficients Using the Van Allen Probes Data
Abstract: ULF waves are a common occurrence in the inner magnetosphere and they contribute to particle motion, significantly, at times. We used the magnetic and the electric field data from the EMFISIS and the EFW instruments on board the Van Allen Probes to estimate the ULF wave power in the compressional component of the magnetic field and the azimuthal component of the electric field, respectively. Using L∗, Kp, and MLT as parameters, we conclude that the noon sector contains higher ULF Pc-5 wave power compared with the other MLT sectors. The dawn, dusk, and midnight sectors have no statistically significant difference between them. The drift-averaged power spectral densities are used to derive the magnetic and the electric component of the radial diffusion coefficient. Both components exhibit . . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023002 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023002
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Paral Jan, Wiltberger Michael, and Turner Drew
Title: Global ULF wave analysis of radial diffusion coefficients using a global MHD model for the 17 March 2015 storm
Abstract: The 17–18 March 2015 storm is the largest geomagnetic storm in the Van Allen Probes era to date. The Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model has been run for this event using ARTEMIS data as solar wind input. The ULF wave power spectral density of the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field is analyzed in the 0.5–8.3 mHz range. The lowest three azimuthal modes account for 70% of the total power during quiet times. However, during high activity, they are not exclusively dominant. The calculation of the radial diffusion coefficient is presented. We conclude that the electric field radial diffusion coefficient is dominant over the magnetic field coefficient by one to two orders of magnitude. This result contrasts with the dominant magnetic field diffusion coefficient used i. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022508 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022508
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Authors: O'Brien T P, Claudepierre S G, Guild T B, Fennell J. F., Turner D. L., et al.
Title: Inner zone and slot electron radial diffusion revisited
Abstract: Using recent data from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we estimate the quiet time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt (L < 3) with energies from ~50 to 750 keV. The observations are consistent with dynamics dominated by pitch angle scattering and radial diffusion. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate phase space density over pitch angle to obtain a “bundle content” that is invariant to pitch angle scattering, except for atmospheric loss. We estimate the effective radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the bundle content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values obtained in the 1960s and 1970s and follow the form one . . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 7301 - 7310 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069749 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL069749/full
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Authors: Selesnick R. S., Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Li X, Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Inward diffusion and loss of radiation belt protons
Abstract: Radiation belt protons in the kinetic energy range 24 to 76 MeV are being measured by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on each of the two Van Allen Probes. Data have been processed for the purpose of studying variability in the trapped proton intensity during October 2013 to August 2015. For the lower energies (≲32 MeV), equatorial proton intensity near L = 2 showed a steady increase that is consistent with inward diffusion of trapped solar protons, as shown by positive radial gradients in phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants. It is postulated that these protons were trapped with enhanced efficiency during the 7 March 2012 solar proton event. A model that includes radial diffusion, along with known trapped proton source and loss processes, s. . .
Date: 03/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2015JA022154 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015JA022154/full
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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations
Abstract: Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak loca. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5520 - 5536 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v121.610.1002/2016JA022400 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022400
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Nishimura Y., Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt
Abstract: The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetra. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022507 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022507
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2015
Authors: Ali Ashar F., Elkington Scot R, Tu Weichao, Ozeke Louis G., Chan Anthony A, et al.
Title: Magnetic field power spectra and magnetic radial diffusion coefficients using CRRES magnetometer data
Abstract: We used the fluxgate magnetometer data from Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) of the compressional component of the geomagnetic field in the ∼1 mHz to ∼8 mHz range. We conclude that magnetic wave power is generally higher in the noon sector for quiet times with no significant difference between the dawn, dusk, and the midnight sectors. However, during high Kp activity, the noon sector is not necessarily dominant anymore. The magnetic PSDs have a very distinct dependence on Kp. In addition, the PSDs appear to have a weak dependence on McIlwain parameter L with power slightly increasing as L increases. The magnetic wave PSDs are used along with the Fei et al. (2006) formulation to compute inline image as a function of L . . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020419 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020419
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2014
Authors: Sarris T. E.
Title: Estimates of the power per mode number of broadband ULF waves at geosynchronous orbit
Abstract: In studies of radial diffusion processes in the magnetosphere it is well known that ultralow frequency (ULF) waves of frequency mωd can resonantly interact with particles of drift frequency ωd, where m is the waves' azimuthal mode number. Due to difficulties in estimating m, an oversimplifying assumption is often made in simulations, namely that all ULF wave power is located at a single mode number. In this paper a technique is presented for extracting information on the distribution of ULF power in a range of azimuthal mode numbers. As a first step, the cross power and phase differences between time series from azimuthally aligned magnetometers are calculated. Subsequently, through integrating the ULF power at particular ranges of phase differences that correspond to particular mode num. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5539 - 5550 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019238 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019238
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Jaynes Allison, Boyd Alexander, Malaspina David, et al.
Title: Modeling Gradual Diffusion Changes in Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes Case Study
Abstract: March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two timescales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration [Baker et al., 2014]. A radial diffusion model was applied to the month-long interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤400 MeV/G, but peaks in phase space density observed by the ECT instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the month-long interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which e. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020359 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020359
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, and Chen Yue
Title: Radial diffusion comparing a THEMIS statistical model with geosynchronous measurements as input
Abstract: The outer boundary energetic electron flux is used as a driver in radial diffusion calculations, and its precise determination is critical to the solution. A new model was proposed recently based on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) measurements to express the boundary flux as three fit functions of solar wind parameters in a response window that depend on energy and which solar wind parameter is used: speed, density, or both. The Dartmouth radial diffusion model has been run using Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geosynchronous satellite measurements as the constraint for a one-month interval in July to August 2004, and the calculated phase space density (PSD) is compared with GPS measurements, at magnetic equatorial plane crossings, as a te. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1863 - 1873 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019320 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019320
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Authors: Albert J
Title: Radial diffusion simulations of the 20 September 2007 radiation belt dropout
Abstract: This is a study of a dropout of radiation belt electrons, associated with an isolated solar wind density pulse on 20 September 2007, as seen by the solid-state telescopes (SST) detectors on THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms). Omnidirectional fluxes were converted to phase space density at constant invariants M = 700 MeV G−1 and K = 0.014 RE G1/2, with the assumption of local pitch angle α ≈ 80° and using the T04 magnetic field model. The last closed drift shell, which was calculated throughout the time interval, never came within the simulation outer boundary of L* = 6. It is found, using several different models for diffusion rates, that radial diffusion alone only allows the data-driven, time-dependent boundary values at Lmax = 6 and Lmin =. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 925 - 934 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-32-925-2014 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/32/925/2014/http://www.ann-geophys.net/32/925/2014/angeo-32-925-2014.pdf
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Authors: Murphy Kyle R., Mann Ian R., and Ozeke Louis G.
Title: A ULF wave driver of ring current energization
Abstract: ULF wave radial diffusion plays an important role in the transport of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt, yet similar ring current transport is seldom considered even though ions satisfy a nearly identical drift resonance condition albeit without the relativistic correction. By examining the correlation between ULF wave power and the response of the ring current, characterized by Dst, we demonstrate a definite correlation between ULF wave power and Dst. Significantly, the lagged correlation peaks such that ULF waves precede the response of the ring current and Dst. We suggest that this correlation is the result of enhanced radial transport and energization of ring current ions through drift resonance and ULF wave radial diffusion of ring current ions. An analysis and compariso. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6595 - 6602 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v41.1910.1002/2014GL061253 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v41.19http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061253
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