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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Ni B, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiati. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4681 - 4693 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.610.1002/2014JA019945 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.6http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019945
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Jaynes Allison, Boyd Alexander, Malaspina David, et al.
Title: Modeling Gradual Diffusion Changes in Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes Case Study
Abstract: March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two timescales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration [Baker et al., 2014]. A radial diffusion model was applied to the month-long interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤400 MeV/G, but peaks in phase space density observed by the ECT instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the month-long interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which e. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020359 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020359
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Authors: Lessard Marc R., Lindgren Erik A., Engebretson Mark J, and Weaver Carol
Title: Solar cycle dependence of ion cyclotron wave frequencies
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been studied for decades, though remain a fundamentally important topic in heliospheric physics. The connection of EMIC waves to the scattering of energetic particles from Earth's radiation belts is one ofmany topics that motivate the need for a deeper understanding of characteristics and occurrence distributions of the waves. In this study, we show that EMIC wave frequencies, as observed at Halley Station in Antarctica from 2008 through 2012, increase by approximately 60% from a minimum in 2009 to the end of 2012. Assuming that these waves are excited in the vicinity of the plasmapause, the change in Kp in going from solar minimum to near solar maximum would drive increased plasmapause erosion, potentially shifting the generation region of t. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020791 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020791
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Authors: Lessard Marc R., Paulson Kristoff, Spence Harlan E., Weaver Carol, Engebretson Mark J, et al.
Title: Generation of EMIC Waves and Effects on Particle Precipitation During a Solar Wind Pressure Intensification with B z >
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms, some fraction of the solar wind energy is coupled via reconnection at the dayside magnetopause, a process that requires a southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Through a complex sequence of events, some of this energy ultimately drives the generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which can then scatter energetic electrons and ions from the radiation belts. In the event described in this paper, the interplanetary magnetic field remained northward throughout the event, a condition unfavorable for solar wind energy coupling through low‐latitude reconnection. While this resulted in SYM/H remaining positive throughout the event (so this may not be considered a storm, in spite of the very high solar wind densities), pressure fluctuations were d. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026477 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026477
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Authors: Lesley Mellinee
Title: “Spacecraft Reveals Recent Geological Activity on the Moon”
Abstract: Through a content analysis of 200 “tweets,” this study was an exploration into the distinct features of text posted to NASA's Twitter site and the potential for these posts to serve as more engaging scientific text than traditional textbooks for adolescents. Results of the content analysis indicated the tweets and linked texts on the NASA Twitter site were constructed primarily as a form of “adapted primary literature” where science texts created by scientists for other scientists are presented in a slightly modified format for the general public. Further, the content analysis revealed the majority of text posted was designed to cultivate scientific knowledge for novices. Findings of the content analysis are presented and implications for teaching scientific literacies to adolescen. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy Pages: 377 - 385 DOI: 10.1002/jaal.2014.57.issue-510.1002/jaal.258 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jaal.2014.57.issue-5http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jaal.258
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Kunduri B. S. R., Mozer F S, and Turner D. L.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere: a result of the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) potential drop
Abstract: It has been reported that the dynamics of energetic (tens to hundreds of keV) electrons and ions is inconsistent with the theoretical picture in which the large‐scale electric field is a superposition of corotation and convection electric fields. Combining one year of measurements by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, DMSP F‐18 and the Van Allen Probes, we show that subauroral polarization streams are observed when energetic electrons have penetrated below L = 4. Outside the plasmasphere in the premidnight region, potential energy is subtracted from the total energy of ions and added to the total energy of electrons during SAPS onset. This potential energy is converted into radial motion as the energetic particles drift around Earth and leave the SAPS azimuthal sector. As a result, . . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077969 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077969
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Roederer Juan G.
Title: The “zebra stripes”: An effect of F-region zonal plasma drifts on the longitudinal distribution of radiation belt particles
Abstract: We examine a characteristic effect, namely, the ubiquitous appearance of structured peaks and valleys called zebra stripes in the spectrograms of energetic electrons and ions trapped in the inner belt below L ~ 3. We propose an explanation of this phenomenon as a purely kinematic consequence of particle drift velocity modulation caused by F region zonal plasma drifts in the ionosphere. In other words, we amend the traditional assumption that the electric field associated with ionospheric plasma drives trapped particle distributions into rigid corotation with the Earth. An equation based on a simple first-order model is set up to determine quantitatively the appearance of zebra stripes as a function of magnetic time. Our numerical predictions are in agreement with measurements by the Ra. . .
Date: 01/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021925 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021925
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Magnetic activity dependence of the electric drift below L=3
Abstract: More than two years of magnetic and electric field measurements by the Van Allen Probes are analyzed with the objective of determining the average effects of magnetic activity on the electric drift below L=3. The study finds that an increase in magnetospheric convection leads to a decrease in the magnitude of the azimuthal component of the electric drift, especially in the night‐side. The amplitude of the slowdown is a function of L, local time MLT, and Kp, in a pattern consistent with the storm‐time dynamics of the ionosphere and thermosphere. To a lesser extent, magnetic activity also alters the average radial component of the electric drift below L=3. A global picture for the average variations of the electric drift with Kp is provided as a function of L and MLT. It is the first tim. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077873 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077873
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Mozer F S
Title: Van Allen Probe measurements of the electric drift E × B/B2 at Arecibo's L = 1.4 field line coordinate
Abstract: We have used electric and magnetic measurements by Van Allen Probe B from 2013 to 2014 to examine the equatorial electric drift E × B/B2 at one field line coordinate set to Arecibo's incoherent scatter radar location (L = 1.43). We report on departures from the traditional picture of corotational motion with the Earth in two ways: (1) the rotational angular speed is found to be 10% smaller than the rotational angular speed of the Earth, in agreement with previous works on plasmaspheric notches, and (2) the equatorial electric drift displays a dependence in magnetic local time, with a pattern consistent with the mapping of the Arecibo ionosphere dynamo electric fields along equipotential magnetic field lines. The electric fields due to the ionosphere dynamo are therefore expected t. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6768 - 6774 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069875 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069875
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Mozer F S
Title: Shorting Factor In‐Flight Calibration for the Van Allen Probes DC Electric Field Measurements in the Earth's Plasmasphere
Abstract: Satellite‐based direct electric field measurements deliver crucial information for space science studies. Yet they require meticulous design and calibration. In‐flight calibration of double‐probe instruments is usually presented in the most common case of tenuous plasmas, where the presence of an electrostatic structure surrounding the charged spacecraft alters the geophysical electric field measurements. To account for this effect and the uncertainty in the boom length, the measured electric field is multiplied by a parameter called the shorting factor (sf). In the plasmasphere, the Debye length is very small in comparison with spacecraft dimension, and there is no shorting of the electric field measurements (sf = 1). However, the electric field induced by spacecraft motion greatly . . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Earth and Space Science Pages: 646 - 654 DOI: 10.1029/2018EA000550 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018EA000550
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) duration as determined from Van Allen Probe successive electric drift measurements
Abstract: We examine a characteristic feature of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, namely, the persistent and latitudinally narrow bands of rapid westward ion drifts called the Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS). Despite countless works on SAPS, information relative to their durations is lacking. Here, we report on the first statistical analysis of more than 200 near-equatorial SAPS observations based on more than two years of Van Allen Probe electric drift measurements. First, we present results relative to SAPS radial locations and amplitudes. Then, we introduce two different ways to estimate SAPS durations. In both cases, SAPS activity is estimated to last for about nine hours on average. However, our estimates for SAPS duration are limited either by the relatively long orbital periods . . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074985 Available at: http://http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074985/full
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Typical values of the electric drift E  ×  B / B 2 in the inner radiation belt and slot region as determined from Van Allen Probe measurements
Abstract: The electric drift E × B/B2 plays a fundamental role for the description of plasma flow and particle acceleration. Yet it is not well-known in the inner belt and slot region because of a lack of reliable in situ measurements. In this article, we present an analysis of the electric drifts measured below L ~ 3 by both Van Allen Probes A and B from September 2012 to December 2014. The objective is to determine the typical components of the equatorial electric drift in both radial and azimuthal directions. The dependences of the components on radial distance, magnetic local time, and geographic longitude are examined. The results from Van Allen Probe A agree with Van Allen Probe B. They show, among other things, a typical corotation lag of the order of 5 to 10% below L ~ 2.6, as w. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023613 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023613/full
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Maus Stefan, and Mozer F S
Title: Model-observation comparison for the geographic variability of the plasma electric drift in the Earth's innermost magnetosphere
Abstract: Plasmaspheric rotation is known to lag behind Earth rotation. The causes for this corotation lag are not yet fully understood. We have used more than two years of Van Allen Probe observations to compare the electric drift measured below L~2 with the predictions of a general model. In the first step, a rigid corotation of the ionosphere with the solid Earth was assumed in the model. The results of the model-observation comparison are twofold: (1) radially, the model explains the average observed geographic variability of the electric drift; (2) azimuthally, the model fails to explain the full amplitude of the observed corotation lag. In the second step, ionospheric corotation was modulated in the model by thermospheric winds, as given by the latest version of the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM1. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074862 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074862/full
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Authors: Lei Mingda, Xie Lun, Li Jinxing, Pu Zuyin, Fu Suiyan, et al.
Title: The Radiation Belt Electron Scattering by Magnetosonic Wave: Dependence on Key Parameters
Abstract: Magnetosonic (MS) waves have been found capable of creating radiation belt electron butterfly distributions in the inner magnetosphere. To investigate the physical nature of the interactions between radiation belt electrons and MS waves, and to explore a preferential condition for MS waves to scatter electrons efficiently, we performed a comprehensive parametric study of MS wave-electron interactions using test particle simulations. The diffusion coefficients simulated by varying the MS wave frequency show that the scattering effect of MS waves is frequency insensitive at low harmonics (f < 20 fcp), which has great implications on modeling the electron scattering caused by MS waves with harmonic structures. The electron scattering caused by MS waves is very sensitive to wave normal angles,. . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023801 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023801/full
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Authors: Lee Justin H., and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Observations and modeling of EMIC wave properties in the presence of multiple ion species as function of magnetic local time
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation and propagation in Earth's magnetosphere depend on readily measurable hot (a few to tens of keV) plasma sheet ions, elusive plasmaspheric or ionospheric cold (sub-eV to a few eV) ions, and partially heated warm ions (tens to hundreds of eV). Previous work has assumed all low-energy ions are cold and not considered possible effects of warm ions. Using measurements by multiple Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we analyze four typical EMIC wave events in the four magnetic local time sectors and consider the properties of both cold and warm ions supplied from previous statistical studies to interpret the wave observations using linear theory. As expected, we find that dusk EMIC waves grow due to . . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020469 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020469
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Authors: Lee Jongkil, Kim Kyung-Chan, Giuseppe Romeo, Ukhorskiy Sasha, Sibeck David, et al.
Title: Space Weather Operation at KASI with Van Allen Probes Beacon Signals
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes (VAPs) are the only modern NASA spacecraft broadcasting real-time data on the Earth's radiation belts for space weather operations. Since 2012, the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has contributed to the receipt of this data via a 7-m satellite tracking antenna and used these data for space weather operations. An approximately 15-min period is required from measurement to acquisition of Level-1 data. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of VAP data for monitoring space weather conditions at geostationary orbit (GEO) by highlighting the Saint Patrick's Day storm of 2015. During that storm, Probe-A observed a significant increase in the relativistic electron flux at 3 RE. Those electrons diffused outward resulting in a large increase of the electron fl. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2017SW001726 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001726/full
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Authors: Lee Jeongwoo, Min Kyungguk, and Kim Kap-Sung
Title: Characteristic dimension of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave activity in the magnetosphere
Abstract: [1] In this paper, we estimate the size of coherent activity of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves using the multi‒spacecraft observations made during the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. We calculate the cross‒correlations between EMIC wave powers measured by different THEMIS spacecraft, plot them over the separation distances between pairs of observing spacecraft, and determine the 1/e folding distance of the correlations as the characteristic dimension of the coherent wave activity. The characteristic radius in the direction transverse to the local magnetic field is found to lie in rather a wide range of 1500–8600 km varying from the AM to PM sectors and also from hydrogen to helium bands. However, the characteristic d. . .
Date: 04/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1651 - 1658 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50242 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.50242
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Authors: Le G., Chi P. J., Strangeway R J, Russell C. T., Slavin J. A., et al.
Title: Global observations of magnetospheric high- m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm
Abstract: We report global observations of high-m poloidal waves during the recovery phase of the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm from a constellation of widely spaced satellites of five missions including Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS), Cluster, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The combined observations demonstrate the global spatial extent of storm time poloidal waves. MMS observations confirm high azimuthal wave numbers (m ~ 100). Mode identification indicates the waves are associated with the second harmonic of field line resonances. The wave frequencies exhibit a decreasing trend as L increases, distinguishing them from the single-frequency global poloidal modes normally obs. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073048 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073048/full
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Authors: Lanzerotti Louis J., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Space Weather Research: Earth's Radiation Belts
Abstract: Fundamental research on Earth's space radiation environment is essential for the design and the operations of modern technologies – for communications, weather, navigation, national security – that fly in the hostile space weather conditions above Earth's atmosphere. As the technologies become ever more advanced, more sophisticated understanding – and even predictability – of the environment is required for mission success
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2017SW001654 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001654/full
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Authors: Lanzerotti L J, and Morgan Caroline G
Title: ULF Geomagnetic Power near L = 4, 2. Temporal Variation of the Radial Diffusion Coefficient for Relativistic Electrons
Abstract: Measurements at conjugate points on the ground near L = 4 of the power spectra of magnetic-field fluctuations in the frequency range 0.5 to 20 mHz are used as a means of estimating daily values for the relativistic-electron radial-diffusion coefficient DLL for two periods in December 1971 and January 1972. The values deduced for L−10 DLL show a strong variation with magnetic activity, as measured by the Fredricksburg magnetic index KFR. The radial-diffusion coefficient typically increases by a factor of ∼10 for a unit increase in KFR. When KFR ≲ 2, it is generally found that DLL ≲ 2 × 10−9 L10 day−1 for equatorially mirroring electrons having a first invariant M = 750 Mev/gauss; a value of DLL ∼4 × 10−7 L10 day−1 is deduced for one day on which the mean KFR was 4.5. The. . .
Date: 08/1973 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 4600 - 4610 DOI: 10.1029/JA078i022p04600 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA078i022p04600/abstract
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Authors: Lanzerotti Louis J.
Title: Space Research and Space Weather: Some Personal Vignettes 1965 to Early 1980s
Abstract: Personal vignettes are given on early days of space research, space weather, and space advisory activities from 1965 to early 1980s.
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026763 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019JA026763
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Authors: Lanzerotti L J, Maclennan C G, and Schulz Michael
Title: Radial Diffusion of Outer-Zone Electrons: An Empirical Approach to Third-Invariant Violation
Abstract: The near-equatorial fluxes of outer-zone electrons (E>0.5 Mev and E>1.9 Mev) measured by an instrument on the satellite Explorer 15 following the geomagnetic storm of December 17–18, 1962, are used to determine the electron radial diffusion coefficients and electron lifetimes as functions of L for selected values of the conserved first invariant µ. For each value of µ, the diffusion coefficient is assumed to be time-independent and representable in the form D = DnLn. The diffusion coefficients and lifetimes are then simultaneously obtained by requiring that the L-dependent reciprocal electron lifetime, as determined from the Fokker-Planck equation, deviate minimally from a constant in time. Applied to the data, these few assumptions yield a value of D that is smaller by approximately a. . .
Date: 10/1970 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 5351 - 5371 DOI: 10.1029/JA075i028p05351 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA075i028p05351/abstract
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