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Van Allen Probes
Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Li W, Bortnik J, Ni B, et al.
Title: Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1960 - 1979 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2014JA019770 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019770
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Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, Friedel Reiner H W, and Cunningham Gregory S.
Title: Global time-dependent chorus maps from low-Earth-orbit electron precipitation and Van Allen Probes data
Abstract: Substorm injected electrons (several–100 s keV) produce whistler-mode chorus waves that are thought to have a major impact on the radiation belts by causing both energization and loss of relativistic electrons in the outer belt. High-altitude measurements, such as those from the Van Allen Probes, provide detailed wave measurements at a few points in the magnetosphere. But physics-based models of radiation-belt dynamics require knowledge of the global distribution of chorus waves. We demonstrate that time-dependent, global distributions of near-equatorial chorus wave intensities can be inferred from low-Earth-orbit (LEO) measurements of precipitating low-energy electrons. We compare in situ observations of near-equatorial chorus waves with LEO observations of precipitating electrons a. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 755 - 761 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059181 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059181
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Authors: Usanova M. E., Drozdov A., Orlova K., Mann I. R., Shprits Y., et al.
Title: Effect of EMIC waves on relativistic and ultrarelativistic electron populations: Ground-based and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: We study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the loss and pitch angle scattering of relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on 11 October 2012. The EMIC wave activity was observed in situ on the Van Allen Probes and conjugately on the ground across the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity throughout an extended 18 h interval. However, neither enhanced precipitation of >0.7 MeV electrons nor reductions in Van Allen Probe 90° pitch angle ultrarelativistic electron flux were observed. Computed radiation belt electron pitch angle diffusion rates demonstrate that rapid pitch angle diffusion is confined to low pitch angles and cannot reach 90°. For the first time, from both obse. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1375 - 1381 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059024 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059024
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Authors: Mazur J E, O'Brien T P, Looper M D, and Blake J B
Title: Large anisotropies of >60 MeV protons throughout the inner belt observed with the Van Allen Probes mission
Abstract: We report large directional anisotropies of >60 MeV protons using instrumentation on the Van Allen Probes. The combination of a spinning satellite and measurements from the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer instruments that are insensitive to protons outside the instrument field of view together yield a new look at proton radial gradients. The relatively large proton gyroradius at 60 MeV couples with the radial gradients to produce large (maximum ~10:1) flux anisotropies depending on (i) whether the proton guiding center was above or below the Van Allen Probes spacecraft and (ii) the sign of the local flux gradient. In addition to these newly measured anisotropies, below ~2000 km we report a new effect of systematically changing minimum altitude on some proton drift shells that furthe. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3738 - 3743 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v41.1110.1002/2014GL060029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v41.11http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL060029
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Authors: Schiller Quintin, Li Xinlin, Blum Lauren, Tu Weichao, Turner Drew L, et al.
Title: A nonstorm time enhancement of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt
Abstract: Despite the lack of a geomagnetic storm (based on the Dst index), relativistic electron fluxes were enhanced over 2.5 orders of magnitude in the outer radiation belt in 13 h on 13–14 January 2013. The unusual enhancement was observed by Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), onboard the Van Allen Probes; Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope Integrated Little Experiment, onboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment; and Solid State Telescope, onboard Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS). Analyses of MagEIS phase space density (PSD) profiles show a positive outward radial gradient from 4 < L < 5.5. However, THEMIS observations show a peak in PSD outside of the Van Allen Probes' apogee, which suggest a very interesting s. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 7 - 12 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058485 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058485
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Nishimura Y., et al.
Title: Quantifying hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation: A detailed conjunction event analysis
Abstract: We analyze a conjunction event between the Van Allen Probes and the low-altitude Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) to quantify hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation. A physics-based technique based on quasi-linear diffusion theory is used to estimate the ratio of precipitated and trapped electron fluxes (R), which could be measured by the two-directional POES particle detectors, using wave and plasma parameters observed by the Van Allen Probes. The remarkable agreement between modeling and observations suggests that this technique is applicable for quantifying hiss-driven electron scattering near the bounce loss cone. More importantly, R in the 100–300 keV energy channel measured by multiple POES satellites over a broad L magnetic local time region can potentially pr. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1085 - 1092 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059132 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059132
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Authors: Santolik O, Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, Hospodarsky G B, and Bounds S R
Title: Fine structure of large-amplitude chorus wave packets
Abstract: Whistler mode chorus waves in the outer Van Allen belt can have consequences for acceleration of relativistic electrons through wave-particle interactions. New multicomponent waveform measurements have been collected by the Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science's Waves instrument. We detect fine structure of chorus elements with peak instantaneous amplitudes of a few hundred picotesla but exceptionally reaching up to 3 nT, i.e., more than 1% of the background magnetic field. The wave vector direction turns by a few tens of degrees within a single chorus element but also within its subpackets. Our analysis of a significant number of subpackets embedded in rising frequency elements shows that amplitudes of their peaks tend to decrease with frequ. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 293 - 299 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058889 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058889
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Authors: Schultz Colin
Title: Boom and bust for radiation belt high-energy electron populations
Abstract: Launched on 30 August 2012, the twin Van Allen probes constitute the first dedicated mission in decades to study the Earth's radiation belts. The sensor-laden spacecraft follow a nearly equatorial orbit, which gives them a complete view of the full range of radiation belt processes. In a new study, Baker et al. lay out some of the surprising results unveiled by the crafts' first year in orbit.
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union Pages: 260 - 260 DOI: 10.1002/eost.v95.2810.1002/2014EO280021 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014EO280021
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Authors: Lui A. T. Y., Mitchell D G, and Lanzerotti L J
Title: Comparison of Energetic Electron Intensities Outside and Inside the Radiation Belts
Abstract: The intensities of energetic electrons (~25 – 800 keV) outside and inside Earth's radiation belts are reported using measurements from THEMIS and Van Allen Probes during non-geomagnetic storm periods. Three intervals of current disruption/dipolarization events in August, 2013 were selected for comparison. The following results are obtained. (1) Phase space densities (PSDs) for the equatorially mirroring electron population at three values of the first adiabatic invariant (20, 70, and 200 MeV/G) at the outer radiation belt boundary are found to be one to three orders of magnitude higher than values measured just inside the radiation belt. (2) There is indication that substorm activity leads to PSD increases inside L = 5.5 in less than 1 hr. (3) Evidence for progressive inward tr. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020049 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020049
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Authors: Foster J. C., Erickson P. J., Baker D N, Claudepierre S G, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Prompt energization of relativistic and highly relativistic electrons during a substorm interval: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: On 17 March 2013, a large magnetic storm significantly depleted the multi-MeV radiation belt. We present multi-instrument observations from the Van Allen Probes spacecraft Radiation Belt Storm Probe A and Radiation Belt Storm Probe B at ~6 Re in the midnight sector magnetosphere and from ground-based ionospheric sensors during a substorm dipolarization followed by rapid reenergization of multi-MeV electrons. A 50% increase in magnetic field magnitude occurred simultaneously with dramatic increases in 100 keV electron fluxes and a 100 times increase in VLF wave intensity. The 100 keV electrons and intense VLF waves provide a seed population and energy source for subsequent radiation belt enhancements. Highly relativistic (>2 MeV) electron fluxes increased immediately at L* ~ 4.5. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 20 - 25 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058438 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058438
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Authors: Gerrard Andrew, Lanzerotti Louis, Gkioulidou Matina, Mitchell Donald, Manweiler Jerry, et al.
Title: Quiet time observations of He ions in the inner magnetosphere as observed from the RBSPICE instrument aboard the Van Allen Probes mission
Abstract: He ions contribute to Earth's ring current energy and species population density and are important in understanding ion transport and charge exchange processes in the inner magnetosphere. He ion flux measurements made by the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument are presented in this paper. Particular focus is centered on geomagnetically quiet intervals in late 2012 and 2013 that show the flux, L-shell, and energy (65 keV to 518 keV) morphology of ring current He ions between geomagnetic storm injection events. The overall He ion abundance during the first nine months of RBSPICE observations, the appearance of a persistent high energy, low L-shell He ion population, and the temporal evolution of this population all provide new insights. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1100 - 1105 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059175 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059175
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Authors: Malaspina D. M., Ergun R. E., Sturner A., Wygant J R, Bonnell J W, et al.
Title: Chorus waves and spacecraft potential fluctuations: Evidence for wave-enhanced photoelectron escape
Abstract: Chorus waves are important for electron energization and loss in Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere. Because the amplitude and spatial distribution of chorus waves can be strongly influenced by plasma density fluctuations and spacecraft floating potential can be a diagnostic of plasma density, the relationship between measured potential and chorus waves is examined using Van Allen Probes data. While measured potential and chorus wave electric fields correlate strongly, potential fluctuation properties are found not to be consistent with plasma density fluctuations on the timescales of individual chorus wave packets. Instead, potential fluctuations are consistent with enhanced photoelectron escape driven by chorus wave electric fields. Enhanced photoelectron escape may result i. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 236 - 243 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058769 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058769
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Authors: Fennell J. F., Roeder J. L., Kurth W S, Henderson M G, Larsen B A, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of direct wave-particle interactions
Abstract: Quasiperiodic increases, or “bursts,” of 17–26 keV electron fluxes in conjunction with chorus wave bursts were observed following a plasma injection on 13 January 2013. The pitch angle distributions changed during the burst events, evolving from sinN(α) to distributions that formed maxima at α = 75–80°, while fluxes at 90° and <60° remained nearly unchanged. The observations occurred outside of the plasmasphere in the postmidnight region and were observed by both Van Allen Probes. Density, cyclotron frequency, and pitch angle of the peak flux were used to estimate resonant electron energy. The result of ~15–35 keV is consistent with the energies of the electrons showing the flux enhancements and corresponds to electrons in and above the steep flux gradient that signa. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1869 - 1875 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059165 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059165
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Authors: Hudson M K, Baker D N, Goldstein J, Kress B T, Paral J., et al.
Title: Simulated magnetopause losses and Van Allen Probe flux dropouts
Abstract: Three radiation belt flux dropout events seen by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope soon after launch of the Van Allen Probes in 2012 (Baker et al., 2013a) have been simulated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD code coupled to the Rice Convection Model, driven by measured upstream solar wind parameters. MHD results show inward motion of the magnetopause for each event, along with enhanced ULF wave power affecting radial transport. Test particle simulations of electron response on 8 October, prior to the strong flux enhancement on 9 October, provide evidence for loss due to magnetopause shadowing, both in energy and pitch angle dependence. Severe plasmapause erosion occurred during ~ 14 h of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz beginning 8 October coincident with. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1113 - 1118 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059222 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059222
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Authors: Chaston Christopher C., Bonnell J W, Wygant John R., Mozer Forrest, Bale Stuart D., et al.
Title: Observations of kinetic scale field line resonances
Abstract: We identify electromagnetic field variations from the Van Allen Probes which have the properties of Doppler shifted kinetic scale Alfvénic field line resonances. These variations are observed during injections of energetic plasmas into the inner magnetosphere. These waves have scale sizes perpendicular to the magnetic field which are determined to be of the order of an ion gyro-radius (ρi) and less. Cross-spectral analysis of the electric and magnetic fields reveals phase transitions at frequencies correlated with enhancements and depressions in the ratio of the electric and magnetic fields. Modeling shows that these observations are consistent with the excitation of field-line resonances over a broad range of wave numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field (k⊥) extending to k⊥ρi. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 209 - 215 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058507 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058507
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Authors: Chen Lunjin, Thorne Richard M, Bortnik Jacob, Li Wen, Horne Richard B, et al.
Title: Generation of Unusually Low Frequency Plasmaspheric Hiss
Abstract: It has been reported from Van Allen Probe observations that plasmaspheric hiss intensification in the outer plasmasphere, associated with a substorm injection on Sept 30 2012, occurred with a peak frequency near 100 Hz, well below the typical plasmaspheric hiss frequency range, extending down to ~20 Hz. We examine this event of unusually low frequency plasmaspheric hiss to understand its generation mechanism. Quantitative analysis is performed by simulating wave ray paths via the HOTRAY ray tracing code with measured plasma density and calculating ray path-integrated wave gain evaluated using the measured energetic electron distribution. We demonstrate that the growth rate due to substorm injected electrons is positive but rather weak, leading to small wave gain (~10 dB) during a sin. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060628 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL060628
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Authors: Yu Yiqun, Koller Josef, Jordanova Vania K., Zaharia Sorin G., Friedel Reinhard W., et al.
Title: Application and testing of the L * neural network with the self-consistent magnetic field model of RAM-SCB
Abstract: We expanded our previous work on L* neural networks that used empirical magnetic field models as the underlying models by applying and extending our technique to drift shells calculated from a physics-based magnetic field model. While empirical magnetic field models represent an average, statistical magnetospheric state, the RAM-SCB model, a first-principles magnetically self-consistent code, computes magnetic fields based on fundamental equations of plasma physics. Unlike the previous L* neural networks that include McIlwain L and mirror point magnetic field as part of the inputs, the new L* neural network only requires solar wind conditions and the Dst index, allowing for an easier preparation of input parameters. This new neural network is compared against those previously trained netwo. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1683 - 1692 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019350 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019350
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Authors: Foster J. C., Erickson P. J., Coster A. J., Thaller S., Tao J., et al.
Title: Storm time observations of plasmasphere erosion flux in the magnetosphere and ionosphere
Abstract: Plasmasphere erosion carries cold dense plasma of ionospheric origin in a storm-enhanced density plume extending from dusk toward and through the noontime cusp and dayside magnetopause and back across polar latitudes in a polar tongue of ionization. We examine dusk sector (20 MLT) plasmasphere erosion during the 17 March 2013 storm (Dst ~ −130 nT) using simultaneous, magnetically aligned direct sunward ion flux observations at high altitude by Van Allen Probes RBSP-A (at ~3.0 Re) and at ionospheric heights (~840 km) by DMSP F-18. Plasma erosion occurs at both high and low altitudes where the subauroral polarization stream flow overlaps the outer plasmasphere. At ~20 UT, RBSP-A observed ~1.2E12 m−2 s−1 erosion flux, while DMSP F-18 observed ~2E13 m−2 s−1 sunward flux. We. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 762 - 768 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059124 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059124
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Authors: Jordanova V K, Yu Y., Niehof J T, Skoug R M, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Simulations of inner magnetosphere dynamics with an expanded RAM-SCB model and comparisons with Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Simulations from our newly expanded ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB), now valid out to 9 RE, are compared for the first time with Van Allen Probes observations. The expanded model reproduces the storm time ring current buildup due to the increased convection and inflow of plasma from the magnetotail. It matches Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) observations of the trapped high-energy (>50 keV) ion flux; however, it underestimates the low-energy (<10 keV) Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) observations. The dispersed injections of ring current ions observed with the Energetic particle, Composition, and Thermal plasma (ECT) suite at high (>20 keV) energy are better reproduced using a high-resolution convection model. . . .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2687 - 2694 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059533 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059533
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, He Zhaoguo, Zhu Hui, et al.
Title: Nonstorm time dynamics of electron radiation belts observed by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Storm time electron radiation belt dynamics have been widely investigated for many years. Here we present a rarely reported nonstorm time event of electron radiation belt evolution observed by the Van Allen Probes during 21–24 February 2013. Within 2 days, a new belt centering around L=5.8 formed and gradually merged with the original outer belt, with the enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes by a factor of up to 50. Strong chorus waves (with power spectral density up to 10−4nT2/Hz) occurred in the region L>5. Taking into account the local acceleration driven by these chorus waves, the two-dimensional STEERB can approximately reproduce the observed energy spectrums at the center of the new belt. These results clearly illustrate the complexity of electron radiation belt behaviors . . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 229 - 235 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058912 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058912
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Authors: Makela Jonathan J., Harding Brian J., Meriwether John W., Mesquita Rafael, Sanders Samuel, et al.
Title: Storm time response of the mid-latitude thermosphere: Observations from a network of Fabry-Perot interferometers
Abstract: Observations of thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures obtained during a geomagnetic storm on 2 October 2013 from a network of six Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) deployed in the midwest United States are presented. Coincident with the commencement of the storm, the apparent horizontal wind is observed to surge westward and southward (towards the equator). Simultaneous to this surge in the apparent horizontal winds, an apparent downward wind of approximately 100 m/s lasting for 6 hours is observed. The apparent neutral temperature is observed to increase by approximately 400 K over all of the sites. Observations from an all-sky imaging system operated at the Millstone Hill observatory indicate the presence of a stable auroral red (SAR) arc and diffuse red aurora during this . . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA019832 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019832
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Authors: Mann I. R., Usanova M. E., Murphy K., Robertson M. T., Milling D. K., et al.
Title: Spatial localization and ducting of EMIC waves: Van Allen Probes and ground-based observations
Abstract: On 11 October 2012, during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm, an extended interval (> 18 h) of continuous electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves was observed by Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity and Solar-Terrestrial Environment Program induction coil magnetometers in North America. At around 14:15 UT, both Van Allen Probes B and A (65° magnetic longitude apart) in conjunction with the ground array observed very narrow (ΔL ~ 0.1–0.4) left-hand polarized EMIC emission confined to regions of mass density gradients at the outer edge of the plasmasphere at L ~ 4. EMIC waves were seen with complex polarization patterns on the ground, in good agreement with model results from Woodroffe and Lysak (2012) and consistent with Earth's . . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 785 - 792 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058581 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058581
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Authors: Ni Binbin, Li Wen, Thorne Richard M, Bortnik Jacob, Ma Qianli, et al.
Title: Resonant scattering of energetic electrons by unusual low-frequency hiss
Abstract: We quantify the resonant scattering effects of the unusual low-frequency dawnside plasmaspheric hiss observed on 30 September 2012 by the Van Allen Probes. In contrast to normal (~100–2000 Hz) hiss emissions, this unusual hiss event contained most of its wave power at ~20–200 Hz. Compared to the scattering by normal hiss, the unusual hiss scattering speeds up the loss of ~50–200 keV electrons and produces more pronounced pancake distributions of ~50–100 keV electrons. It is demonstrated that such unusual low-frequency hiss, even with a duration of a couple of hours, plays a particularly important role in the decay and loss process of energetic electrons, resulting in shorter electron lifetimes for ~50–400 keV electrons than normal hiss, and should be carefully incorpora. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1854 - 1861 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059389 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059389
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Ni B, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiati. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4681 - 4693 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.610.1002/2014JA019945 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.6http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019945
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Authors: O'Brien T P, Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, Fennell J. F., Clemmons J. H., et al.
Title: An empirically observed pitch-angle diffusion eigenmode in the Earth's electron belt near L *  = 5.0
Abstract: Using data from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we have identified a synchronized exponential decay of electron flux in the outer zone, near L* = 5.0. Exponential decays strongly indicate the presence of a pure eigenmode of a diffusion operator acting in the synchronized dimension(s). The decay has a time scale of about 4 days with no dependence on pitch angle. While flux at nearby energies and L* is also decaying exponentially, the decay time varies in those dimensions. This suggests the primary decay mechanism is elastic pitch angle scattering, which itself depends on energy and L*. We invert the shape of the observed eigenmode to obtain an approximate shape of the pitch angle diffusion coefficient and show excellent agreement with diffusion by plasmaspheric hiss. Our results suggest that e. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 251 - 258 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058713 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058713
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Authors: Zhao H., Li X, Blake J B, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, et al.
Title: Peculiar pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot region
Abstract: The relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt have received little attention in the past due to sparse measurements and unforgiving contamination from the inner belt protons. The high-quality measurements of the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard Van Allen Probes provide a great opportunity to investigate the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the low L region. In this letter, we report the newly unveiled pitch angle distribution (PAD) of the energetic electrons with minima at 90° near the magnetic equator in the inner belt and slot region. Such a PAD is persistently present throughout the inner belt and appears in the slot region during storms. One hypothesis for 90° minimum PADs is that off 90° electrons are preferentially heated by chorus waves just out. . .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2250 - 2257 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059725 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059725
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Authors: Boyd A. J., Spence H E, Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Quantifying the radiation belt seed population in the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event
Abstract: We present phase space density (PSD) observations using data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument on the Van Allen Probes for the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event. We confirm previous results and quantify how PSD gradients depend on the first adiabatic invariant. We find a systematic difference between the lower-energy electrons (1 MeV with a source region within the radiation belts. Our observations show that the source process begins with enhancements to the 10s–100s keV energy seed population, followed by enhancements to the >1 MeV population and eventually leading to enhancements in the multi-MeV electron population. These observations provide the clearest evidence to date . . .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2275 - 2281 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059626 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059626
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Green J C, et al.
Title: Constructing the global distribution of chorus wave intensity using measurements of electrons by the POES satellites and waves by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We adopt a physics-based technique to infer chorus wave amplitudes from the low-altitude electron population (30–100 keV) measured by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage over a broad region in L-shell and magnetic local time (MLT). This technique is validated by analyzing conjunction events between the Van Allen Probes measuring chorus wave amplitudes near the equator and POES satellites measuring the 30–100 keV electron population at the conjugate low altitudes. We apply this technique to construct the chorus wave distributions during the 8–9 October storm in 2012 and demonstrate that the inferred chorus wave amplitudes agree reasonably well with conjugate measurements of chorus wave amplitudes from the Van Allen Probes. The . . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4526 - 4532 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v40.1710.1002/grl.50920 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v40.17http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50920
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Authors: Reeves Geoffrey D
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes: The Next Generation of Space Weather Forecasting
Abstract: N/A
Date: 11/2007 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2007SW000341 Available at: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2007/2007SW000341.shtml
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Authors: Mauk Barry H., Sibeck David G., and Kessel Ramona L.
Title: Journal Special Collection Explores Early Results From the Van Allen Probes Mission
Abstract: The processes governing the charged particle populations in the radiation belts encircling Earth have been the subject of intense interest and increasing concern since their discovery by James Van Allen and his team more than 50 years ago [Baker et al., 2013]. Intense interest continues because we still do not know how the various processes work in concert to enhance, remove, and transport particle radiation. Concern is ongoing because the Van Allen radiation belts pose hazards to astronauts and our ever-growing fleet of spacecraft with increasingly sensitive components.
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union Pages: 112 - 112 DOI: 10.1002/eost.v95.1310.1002/2014EO130007 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eost.v95.13http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014EO130007
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Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Mitchell D G, Takahashi K, Lanzerotti L J, et al.
Title: Rotationally driven ‘zebra stripes’ in Earth’s inner radiation belt
Abstract: Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity1, 2, 3, 4. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn5, 6, 7, 8, 9, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth’s rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1–2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth’s inner radiation belt are organize. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Nature Pages: 338 - 340 DOI: 10.1038/nature13046 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature13046
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Authors: Selesnick R. S., Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Li X, Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Observations of the inner radiation belt: CRAND and trapped solar protons
Abstract: Measurements of inner radiation belt protons have been made by the Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes as a function of kinetic energy (24 to 76 MeV), equatorial pitch angle, and magnetic L shell, during late-2013 and early-2014. A probabilistic data analysis method reduces background from contamination by higher energy protons. Resulting proton intensities are compared to predictions of a theoretical radiation belt model. Then trapped protons originating both from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) and from trapping of solar protons are evident in the measured distributions. An observed double-peaked distribution in L is attributed, based on the model comparison, to a gap in the occurrence of solar proton events during the 2007 to 2011 solar minimum. Equatorial. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020188 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020188
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Authors: Baker Daniel
Title: New Twists in Earth’s Radiation Belts
Abstract: In 1958, an early satellite, Explorer I, made the discovery that Earth is enshrouded in belts of extraordinarily high-energy, high-intensity radiation. Now called the Van Allen belts, after the researcher who led that satellite mission, these rings are known to wax and wane in intensity, for reasons that are still being investigated. Satellites now criss-cross these belts, so understanding what influences them has dire implications for communications and other technologies in our modern age. Solar storms and space weather can pump them up, making the radiation zones around Earth immensely more dangerous for days or even weeks on end. The author has been involved with instruments on the dual Radiation Belt Storm Probes satellites that were launched on August 30, 2012, into Earth orbit to st. . .
Date: 09/2014 Publisher: American Scientist Pages: 374 DOI: 10.1511/2014.110.374 Available at: http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2014/5/new-twists-in-earths-radiation-belts
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Authors: Malaspina D. M., Andersson L., Ergun R. E., Wygant J R, Bonnell J W, et al.
Title: Nonlinear Electric Field Structures in the Inner Magnetosphere
Abstract: Van Allen Probes observations are presented which demonstrate the presence of nonlinear electric field structures in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere (< 6 RE). A range of structures are observed, including phase space holes and double layers.These structures are observed over several Earth radii in radial distance and over a wide range of magnetic local times. They are observed in the dusk, midnight, and dawn sectors, with the highest concentration pre-midnight. Some nonlinear electric field structures are observed to coincide with dipolarizations of the magnetic field and increases in electron energy flux for energies between 1 keV and 30 keV. Nonlinear electric field structures possess isolated impulsive electric fields, often with a significant component parallel to the ambient m. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061109 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061109
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Authors: Mozer S., Agapitov O., Krasnoselskikh V., Lejosne S., Reeves D., et al.
Title: Direct Observation of Radiation-Belt Electron Acceleration from Electron-Volt Energies to Megavolts by Nonlinear Whistlers
Abstract: The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth’s outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electri. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Physical Review Letters DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001 Available at: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001
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Authors: Butler Michael, and Laughery Sean
Title: The RBSP Spacecraft Power System Design and Development
Abstract: The RBSP (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin spacecraft are set to launch in August 2012. The spacecraft will be inserted into the highly elliptical regions of high energy particles trapped by the magnetic field of the earth. These regions are often referred to as the Van Allen Belts. The twin spacecraft will operate entirely within the radiation belts throughout their mission. Because of the intense environment of operation and to reduce cost and risk, the approach taken in the power system electronics was to use quasi conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques encased in a 350mil thick aluminum enclosure. The spacecraft are spin stabilized with an axial boom that creates a shadow across the solar arrays. The power system topology selected was a 28V unregulat. . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MIECEC1210.2514/6.2012-4059 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2012-4059
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Authors: Skov Mulligan, Fennell J.F., Roeder J.L., Blake J.B., and Claudepierre S.G.
Title: Internal Charging Hazards in Near-Earth Space during Solar Cycle 24 Maximum: Van Allen Probes Measurements
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes mission provides an unprecedented opportunity to make detailed measurements of electrons and protons in the inner magnetosphere during the weak solar maximum period of cycle 24. Data from the MagEIS suite of sensors measures energy spectra, fluxes, and yields electron deposition rates that can cause internal charging. We use omni-directional fluxes of electrons and protons to calculate the dose under varying materials and thicknesses of shielding (similar to Fennell et al., 2010). We show examples of charge deposition rates during times of nominal and high levels of penetrating fluxes in the inner magnetosphere covering the period from late 2012 through 2013. These charge deposition rates are related to charging levels quite possibly encountered. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: JPL DOI: 10.1109/TPS.2015.2468214 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7247811/?reload=true&arnumber=7247811
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Authors: Reeves G D, Spence H E, Henderson M G, Morley S. K., Friedel R H W, et al.
Title: Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth’s magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA’s Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belt. . .
Date: 07/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 991 - 994 DOI: 10.1126/science.1237743 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.1237743
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: An unusual enhancement of low-frequency plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere associated with substorm-injected electrons
Abstract: Both plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves were observed simultaneously by the two Van Allen Probes in association with substorm-injected energetic electrons. Probe A, located inside the plasmasphere in the postdawn sector, observed intense plasmaspheric hiss, whereas Probe B observed chorus waves outside the plasmasphere just before dawn. Dispersed injections of energetic electrons were observed in the dayside outer plasmasphere associated with significant intensification of plasmaspheric hiss at frequencies down to ~20 Hz, much lower than typical hiss wave frequencies of 100–2000 Hz. In the outer plasmasphere, the upper energy of injected electrons agrees well with the minimum cyclotron resonant energy calculated for the lower cutoff frequency of the observed hiss, and computed conve. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3798 - 3803 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50787 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50787
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Authors: Mozer F, Bale S., Bonnell J W, Chaston C., Roth I, et al.
Title: Megavolt Parallel Potentials Arising from Double-Layer Streams in the Earth’s Outer Radiation Belt
Abstract: Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth’s outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230 000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1 000 000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, t. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Physical Review Letters DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.235002 Available at: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.235002
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Authors: Ni Binbin, Bortnik Jacob, Thorne Richard M, Ma Qianli, and Chen Lunjin
Title: Resonant scattering and resultant pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons by plasmaspheric hiss
Abstract: We perform a comprehensive analysis to evaluate hiss-induced scattering effect on the pitch angle evolution and associated decay processes of relativistic electrons. The results show that scattering by the equatorial, highly oblique hiss component is negligible. Quasi-parallel approximation is good for evaluation of hiss-driven electron scattering rates ≤ 2 MeV. However, realistic wave propagation angles as a function of latitude must be considered to accurately quantify hiss scattering rates above 2 MeV, and ambient plasma density is also a critical parameter. While the first-order cyclotron and the Landau resonances are dominant for hiss scattering < 2 MeV electrons, higher-order resonances become important and even dominant at intermediate pitch angles for ultrarelativistic (≥. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7740 - 7751 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019260 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019260
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Authors: Mauk B H
Title: Analysis of EMIC-wave-moderated flux limitation of measured energetic ion spectra in multispecies magnetospheric plasmas
Abstract: A differential Kennel-Petschek (KP) flux limit for magnetospheric energetic ions is devised taking into account multiple ion species effects on electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves that scatter the ions. The idea is that EMIC waves may limit the highest ion intensities during acceleration phases of storms and substorms (~ hour) while other mechanisms (e.g., charge exchange) may account for losses below those limits and over longer periods of time. This approach is applied to published Earth magnetosphere energetic ion spectra (~ keV to ~1 MeV) for radial positions (L) 3 to 6.7 RE. The flatness of the most intense spectral shapes for <100 keV indicate sculpting by just such a mechanism, but modifications of traditional KP parameters are needed to account for maximum fluxes up to 5. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3804 - 3808 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50789 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50789
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Authors: Blum L. W., Schiller Q., Li X, Millan R., Halford A., et al.
Title: New conjunctive CubeSat and balloon measurements to quantify rapid energetic electron precipitation
Abstract: Relativistic electron precipitation into the atmosphere can contribute significant losses to the outer radiation belt. In particular, rapid narrow precipitation features termed precipitation bands have been hypothesized to be an integral contributor to relativistic electron precipitation loss, but quantification of their net effect is still needed. Here we investigate precipitation bands as measured at low earth orbit by the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat. Two precipitation bands of MeV electrons were observed on 18–19 January 2013, concurrent with precipitation seen by the 2013 Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign. The newly available conjugate measurements allow for a detailed estimate of the temporal and spatial fea. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 5833 - 5837 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058546 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058546
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Authors: Butler M. H.
Title: The Van Allen Probes Power System Launch and Early Mission Performance
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes are twin NASA spacecraft that were launched August 30, 2012, into lapping highly elliptical earth orbits. The twin spacecraft will operate within the Van Allen radiation belts throughout their two-year mission. The Van Allen Probes are sponsored by NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) Program. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory designed, fabricated, and operates the twin spacecraft for NASA. The power systems of the twin spacecraft are identical. A direct energy transfer topology was selected for the power system. The loads are connected directly to the eight-cell Lithium Ion battery. The solar panels consist of triple junction cells. The design average power of each spacecraft is about 350 Watts, nominal 28.8 volt bus. A single 50 AH . . .
Date: 07/2013 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MIECEC1310.2514/6.2013-3737 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2013-3737
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Authors: Reid Mark, and Ottman Geffrey
Title: Software controlled memory scrubbing for the Van Allen Probes Solid State Recorder (SSR) memory
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes mission which was designed and built by the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) is also being operated by the APL mission operations team in Laurel, Maryland. The two Van Allen Probes spacecraft have been successfully collecting data on orbit since they were launched on August 30, 2012. These twin probes are providing unprecedented insight into the physical dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and are giving scientists the data they need to make predictions of changes in this critical region of space, by sampling the harsh radiation belt environment where major space weather activity occurs and many spacecraft operate.[1] Shortly after launch, radiation induced anomalies were reported on both spacecraft and investigated by the hardware and sof. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836406 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836406
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Authors: Berman Simmie, Cheng Weilun, Borowski Heather, and Persons David
Title: Spin stabilization design and testing of the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: This paper describes the design decisions taken and the mass properties tracking and testing flow chosen for the Van Allen Probes spacecraft and their deployable systems to achieve the coning angle requirements. Topics include a list of major requirements, a brief description of the error budget, a description of the tracking process of the spacecraft mass properties prior to test, a description of the spin balance and mass properties testing of the spacecraft core and deployable systems, and a presentation of the final mass properties and coning angle calculations of the fully deployed observatories. Launched August 30, 2012, the observed on-orbit, fully deployed configuration coning angles met the requirements, validating the spin balance and mass properties tracking, testing, and calcul. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836234 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836234
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Authors: Harvey Raymond J., and Eichstedt John
Title: Van Allen Probes Low Cost Mission Operations Concept and Lessons Learned
Abstract: Following a successful 60-day commissioning period, NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, was renamed Van Allen Probes in honor of the discoverer of Earth’s radiation belts – James Van Allen. The Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) executed the mission and is currently operating the twin spacecraft in their primary mission. Improving on the cost-savings concepts employed by prior APL projects, the Van Allen Probes mission operations was designed from the start for low-cost, highly-automated mission operations. This concept is realized with automated initial planning and contact scheduling, unattended real-time operations, and spacecraft performance assessment from the review of data products that have been automatically generat. . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MSPACE1310.2514/6.2013-5450 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2013-5450
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Authors: Kirby Karen, and Stratton Jim
Title: Van Allen Probes: Successful launch campaign and early operations exploring Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probe observatories developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's Heliophysics Division completed final observatory integration and environmental test activities and were successfully launched into orbit around the Earth on August 30, 2012. As the science operations phase begins, the mission is providing exciting new information about the impact of radiation belt activity on the earth. The on-board boom mounted magnetometers and other instruments are the most sensitive sensors of their type that have ever flown in the Van Allen radiation belts. The observatories are producing near-Earth space weather information that can be used to provide warnings of potential power grid interruptions or satellite damaging storms. The Van Allen Probes a. . .
Date: 03/2013 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2013.6496838 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6496838
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Authors: Hudson M K
Title: Space physics: A fast lane in the magnetosphere
Abstract: A marriage between satellite observations and modelling has shown that acceleration of electrons in the magnetosphere can be explained by scattering of these particles by plasma oscillations known as chorus waves.
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Nature Pages: 383 - 384 DOI: 10.1038/504383a Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/504383a
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Authors: Smith Evan J., Butler Michael H., Fretz Kristin, and Wilhelm Benjamin
Title: Lithium Ion Battery Fault Management on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes or RBSP) mission launched on 30 August 2012 as part of NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) Program. The ultimate goal of the mission is to understand how populations of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts are affected by the Sun. The mission consists of two nearly identical observatories orbiting in highly-elliptical Earth orbits. The two satellite system allows for the study of the spatial and temporal effects the Sun has on the Earth’s radiation belts. Each observatory is equipped with a suite of instruments designed to continuously study ions, electrons and the local magnetic and electric fields. A brief overview of the Van Allen Probe mission is pre. . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/6.2013-5526 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2013-5526
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