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C
Authors: Roederer Juan G., and Lejosne ène
Title: Coordinates for Representing Radiation Belt Particle Flux
Abstract: Fifty years have passed since the parameter “L-star” was introduced in geomagnetically trapped particle dynamics. It is thus timely to review the use of adiabatic theory in present-day studies of the radiation belts, with the intention of helping to prevent common misinterpretations and the frequent confusion between concepts like “distance to the equatorial point of a field line,” McIlwain's L-value, and the trapped particle's adiabatic L* parameter. And too often do we miss in the recent literature a proper discussion of the extent to which some observed time and space signatures of particle flux could simply be due to changes in magnetospheric field, especially insofar as off-equatorial particles are concerned. We present a brief review on the history of radiation belt parameter. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA025053 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA025053/full
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Authors: Jaynes A. N., Lessard M. R., Takahashi K., Ali A. F., Malaspina D. M., et al.
Title: Correlated Pc4-5 ULF waves, whistler-mode chorus and pulsating aurora observed by the Van Allen Probes and ground-based systems
Abstract: Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch-angle scattering of 10's keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recently published satellite studies have strengthened this argument, by showing strong correlation between pulsating auroral patches and both lower-band chorus and 10's keV electron modulation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. Additionally, a previous link has been made between Pc4-5 compressional pulsations and modulation of whistler-mode chorus using THEMIS. In the current study, we present simultaneous in-situ observations of structured chorus waves and an apparent field line resonance (in the Pc4-5 range) as a result of a substorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes, along with groun. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021380 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021380
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Authors: Nag Sreeja, LeMoigne Jacqueline, and de Weck Olivier
Title: Cost and risk analysis of small satellite constellations for earth observation
Abstract: Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to Earth science missions owing to their ability to increase observation sampling in spatial, spectral, temporal and angular dimensions. Past literature from academia and industry have proposed and evaluated many cost models for spacecraft as well as methods for quantifying risk. However, there have been few comprehensive studies quantifying the cost for multiple spacecraft, for small satellites and the cost risk for the operations phase of the project which needs to be budgeted for when designing and building efficient architectures. This paper identifies the three critical problems with the applicability of current cost and risk models to distributed small satellite missions and uses data-based modeling to sugges. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836396 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836396
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Authors: Goldstein J, Angelopoulos V, De Pascuale S., Funsten H O, Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS
Abstract: We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside sout. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 368 - 392 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v122.110.1002/2016JA023173 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023173/full
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Authors: Goldstein J., Angelopoulos V., De Pascuale S., Funsten H. O., Kurth W. S., et al.
Title: Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS
Abstract: We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside sout. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023173 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023173
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Authors: Cattell C., Breneman A., Colpitts C., Dombeck J., Thaller S., et al.
Title: Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES-13
Abstract: Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (~8 Re) and Van Allen Probes (~5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double-peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated ExB flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by MMS, with a speed that is comparable to the ExB flow. The magnetopause speed and the ExB speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES-13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074895 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074895/full
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Authors: Pinto V. A., Mourenas D., Bortnik J, Zhang X.‐J., Artemyev A. V., et al.
Title: Decay of Ultrarelativistic Remnant Belt Electrons Through Scattering by Plasmaspheric Hiss
Abstract: Ultrarelativistic electron remnant belts appear frequently following geomagnetic disturbances and are located in‐between the inner radiation belt and a reforming outer belt. As remnant belts are relatively stable, here we explore the importance of hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in controlling the observed decay rates of remnant belt ultrarelativistic electrons in a statistical way. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes inside the plasmasphere for 25 remnant belt events that occurred between 2012 and 2017 and that are located in the region 2.9Date: Dec-07-2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026509 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026509
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Authors: Liggett William, Handiboe Jon, Theus Eugene, Hartka Ted, and Navid Hadi
Title: Design of a spacecraft integration and test facility at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Abstract: The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) is dedicated to solving critical challenges as set forth by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Department of Defense. JHU/APL participates fully in the nation's formulation of space science and exploration priorities, providing the needed science, engineering, and technology, including the production and operation of unique spacecraft, instruments, and subsystems.
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836273 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836273
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Authors: Hartinger M. D., Claudepierre S G, Turner D. L., Reeves G D, Breneman A., et al.
Title: Diagnosis of ULF Wave-Particle Interactions With Megaelectron Volt Electrons: The Importance of Ultrahigh-Resolution Energy Channels
Abstract: Electron flux measurements are an important diagnostic for interactions between ultralow‐frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic (∼1 MeV) electrons. Since measurements are collected by particle detectors with finite energy channel width, they are affected by a phase mixing process that can obscure these interactions. We demonstrate that ultrahigh‐resolution electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer on the Van Allen Probes mission—obtained using a data product that improves the energy resolution by roughly an order of magnitude—are crucial for understanding ULF wave‐particle interactions. In particular, the ultrahigh‐resolution measurements reveal a range of complex dynamics that cannot be resolved by standard measurements. Furthermore, the standard meas. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080291 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080291
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Authors: Chen Margaret W., Lemon Colby L., Hecht James, Sazykin Stanislav, Wolf Richard A., et al.
Title: Diffuse Auroral Electron and Ion Precipitation Effects on RCM‐E Comparisons with Satellite Data During the March 17, 2013 Storm
Abstract: Effects of scattering of electrons from whistler chorus waves and of ions due to field line curvature on diffuse precipitating particle fluxes and ionospheric conductance during the large 17 March 2013 storm are examined using the self‐consistent Rice Convection Model Equilibrium (RCM‐E) model. Electrons are found to dominate the diffuse precipitating particle integrated energy flux, with large fluxes from ~21:00 magnetic local time (MLT) eastward to ~11:00 MLT during the storm main phase. Simulated proton and oxygen ion precipitation due to field line curvature scattering is sporadic and localized, occurring where model magnetic field lines are significantly stretched on the night side at equatorial geocentric radial distances r0 ≳8 RE and/or at r0 ~5.5 to 6.5 RE from dusk to midnig. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026545 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026545
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Diffusive transport of several hundred keV electrons in the Earth's slot region
Abstract: We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of ~200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10-day non-disturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L~2.7 to L~2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of ~2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a 3-dimentional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from ~100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the . . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024452 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024452/full
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Authors: Liu Jiang, Angelopoulos V, Zhang Xiao-Jia, Turner D. L., Gabrielse C., et al.
Title: Dipolarizing flux bundles in the cis-geosynchronous magnetosphere: relationship between electric fields and energetic particle injections
Abstract: Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) are small flux tubes (typically < 3 RE in XGSM and YGSM) in the nightside magnetosphere that have magnetic field more dipolar than the background. Although DFBs are known to accelerate particles, creating energetic particle injections outside geosynchronous orbit (trans-GEO), the nature of the acceleration mechanism and the importance of DFBs in generating injections inside geosynchronous orbit (cis-GEO) are unclear. Our statistical study of cis-GEO DFBs using data from the Van Allen Probes reveals that just like trans-GEO DFBs, cis-GEO DFBs occur most often in the pre-midnight sector, but their occurrence rate is ~1/3 that of trans-GEO DFBs. Half the cis-GEO DFBs are accompanied by an energetic particle injection and have an electric field three times stro. . .
Date: 01/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021691 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021691
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Authors: Liu Jiang, Angelopoulos V, Zhang Xiao-Jia, Turner D. L., Gabrielse C., et al.
Title: Dipolarizing flux bundles in the cis-geosynchronous magnetosphere: relationship between electric fields and energetic particle injections
Abstract: Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) are small flux tubes (typically < 3 RE in XGSM and YGSM) in the nightside magnetosphere that have magnetic field more dipolar than the background. Although DFBs are known to accelerate particles, creating energetic particle injections outside geosynchronous orbit (trans-GEO), the nature of the acceleration mechanism and the importance of DFBs in generating injections inside geosynchronous orbit (cis-GEO) are unclear. Our statistical study of cis-GEO DFBs using data from the Van Allen Probes reveals that just like trans-GEO DFBs, cis-GEO DFBs occur most often in the pre-midnight sector, but their occurrence rate is ~1/3 that of trans-GEO DFBs. Half the cis-GEO DFBs are accompanied by an energetic particle injection and have an electric field three times stro. . .
Date: 01/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021691 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021691
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Authors: Zhang X.-J., Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: Direct evidence for EMIC wave scattering of relativistic electrons in space
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been proposed to cause efficient losses of highly relativistic (>1 MeV) electrons via gyroresonant interactions. Simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and equatorial electron pitch angle distributions, which can be used to directly quantify the EMIC wave scattering effect, are still very limited, however. In the present study, we evaluate the effect of EMIC waves on pitch angle scattering of ultrarelativistic (>1 MeV) electrons during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm, when intense EMIC wave activity was observed in situ (in the plasma plume region with high plasma density) on both Van Allen Probes. EMIC waves captured by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes and on the ground across the. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022521 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022521
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Wang Geng, Liu Nigang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Direct observation of generation and propagation of magnetosonic waves following substorm injection
Abstract: Magnetosonic whistler mode waves play an important role in the radiation belt electron dynamics. Previous theory has suggested that these waves are excited by the ring distributions of hot protons and can propagate radially and azimuthally over a broad spatial range. However, because of the challenging requirements on satellite locations and data-processing techniques, this theory was difficult to validate directly. Here we present some experimental tests of the theory on the basis of Van Allen Probes observations of magnetosonic waves following substorm injections. At higher L-shells with significant substorm injections, the discrete magnetosonic emission lines started approximately at the proton gyrofrequency harmonics, qualitatively consistent with the prediction of linear proton Bernst. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074362 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074362/full
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Authors: Mozer F S, Agapitov O., Krasnoselskikh V., Lejosne S., Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Direct Observation of Radiation-Belt Electron Acceleration from Electron-Volt Energies to Megavolts by Nonlinear Whistlers
Abstract: The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth’s outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electri. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Phys. Rev. Lett. Pages: 035001 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001 Available at: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001
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Authors: Mozer S., Agapitov O., Krasnoselskikh V., Lejosne S., Reeves D., et al.
Title: Direct Observation of Radiation-Belt Electron Acceleration from Electron-Volt Energies to Megavolts by Nonlinear Whistlers
Abstract: The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth’s outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electri. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Physical Review Letters DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001 Available at: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.035001
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Authors: Zhang Q. -H., Lockwood M., Foster J. C., Zhang S. -R., Zhang B. -C., et al.
Title: Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions
Abstract: Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches’ evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume (SED) at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary (PCB) due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in-situ THEMIS observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, whilst being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and SuperDARN radars. Changes in convectio. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021172 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021172
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Authors: Zhang Q. -H., Lockwood M., Foster J. C., Zhang S. -R., Zhang B. -C., et al.
Title: Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions
Abstract: Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches’ evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume (SED) at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary (PCB) due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in-situ THEMIS observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, whilst being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and SuperDARN radars. Changes in convectio. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021172 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021172
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Authors: Mann Ian R., Lee E. A., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Degeling A., et al.
Title: Discovery of the action of a geophysical synchrotron in the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Although the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts were discovered over 50 years ago, the dominant processes responsible for relativistic electron acceleration, transport and loss remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for the action of coherent acceleration due to resonance with ultra-low frequency waves on a planetary scale. Data from the CRRES probe, and from the recently launched multi-satellite NASA Van Allen Probes mission, with supporting modeling, collectively show coherent ultra-low frequency interactions which high energy resolution data reveals are far more common than either previously thought or observed. The observed modulations and energy-dependent spatial structure indicate a mode of action analogous to a geophysical synchrotron; this new mode of response represents . . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Nature Communications DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3795 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms3795
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Authors: Cohen Ian J., Mitchell Donald G., Kistler Lynn M., Mauk Barry H., Anderson Brian J., et al.
Title: Dominance of high energy (>150 keV) heavy ion intensities in Earth's middle to outer magnetosphere
Abstract: Previous observations have driven the prevailing assumption in the field that energetic ions measured by an instrument using a bare solid state detector (SSD) are predominantly protons. However, new near-equatorial energetic particle observations obtained between 7 and 12 RE during Phase 1 of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission challenge the validity of this assumption. In particular, measurements by the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instruments have revealed that the intensities of heavy ion species (specifically oxygen and helium) dominate those of protons at energies math formula150-220 keV in the middle to outer (>7 RE) magnetosphere. Given that relative composition measurements can drift as sensors degrade in gain, quality cross-calibration agreement between EIS observation. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024351 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024351/full
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Authors: Cohen Ian J., Mitchell Donald G., Kistler Lynn M., Mauk Barry H., Anderson Brian J., et al.
Title: Dominance of high energy (>150 keV) heavy ion intensities in Earth's middle to outer magnetosphere
Abstract: Previous observations have driven the prevailing assumption in the field that energetic ions measured by an instrument using a bare solid state detector (SSD) are predominantly protons. However, new near-equatorial energetic particle observations obtained between 7 and 12 RE during Phase 1 of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission challenge the validity of this assumption. In particular, measurements by the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instruments have revealed that the intensities of heavy ion species (specifically oxygen and helium) dominate those of protons at energies math formula150-220 keV in the middle to outer (>7 RE) magnetosphere. Given that relative composition measurements can drift as sensors degrade in gain, quality cross-calibration agreement between EIS observation. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024351 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024351/full
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Authors: Ferradas C. P., Zhang J.-C., Spence H E, Kistler L. M., Larsen B A, et al.
Title: Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet
Abstract: We present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of. . .
Date: 11/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071359 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071359/full
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Authors: Li W, Shprits Y Y, and Thorne R M
Title: Dynamic evolution of energetic outer zone electrons due to wave-particle interactions during storms
Abstract: [1] Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt are subjected to pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), and hiss waves. Using quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for cyclotron resonance with field-aligned waves, we examine whether the resonant interactions with chorus waves produce a net acceleration or loss of relativistic electrons. We also examine the effect of pitch angle scattering by EMIC and hiss waves during the main and recovery phases of a storm. The numerical simulations show that wave-particle interactions with whistler mode chorus waves with realistic wave spectral properties result in a net acceleration of relativistic electrons, while EMIC waves, which provide very fast scattering near the edge of the loss cone, may be a domi. . .
Date: 10/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2007JA012368 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007JA012368/full
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Authors: Liu Bin, Li Liuyuan, Yu Jiang, and Cao Jinbin
Title: The Effect of Hot Protons on Magnetosonic Waves Inside and Outside the Plasmapause: New Observations and Theoretic Results
Abstract: Based on the wave and proton observations by Van Allen Probes A and B, we examined the effects of hot protons (0.01–50 keV) on fast magnetosonic (MS) waves inside and outside the Earth's plasmasphere. In the low-density plasma trough outside the plasmapause, the gyroresonance interactions between hot protons and MS waves not only cause the MS wave growth at some frequencies but also lead to the damping of MS waves at other frequencies, which depends on the proton phase space density gradient and the ambient plasma density. The gyroresonance of the observed hot protons cannot excite MS waves near the lower hybrid resonance frequency and even causes the MS wave damping. Thus, the frequencies of the observed MS waves outside the plasmapause are usually lower than the lower hybrid resonance . . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024676 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024676/full
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Authors: Liu Bin, Li Liuyuan, Yu Jiang, and Cao Jinbin
Title: The Effect of Hot Protons on Magnetosonic Waves Inside and Outside the Plasmapause: New Observations and Theoretic Results
Abstract: Based on the wave and proton observations by Van Allen Probes A and B, we examined the effects of hot protons (0.01–50 keV) on fast magnetosonic (MS) waves inside and outside the Earth's plasmasphere. In the low-density plasma trough outside the plasmapause, the gyroresonance interactions between hot protons and MS waves not only cause the MS wave growth at some frequencies but also lead to the damping of MS waves at other frequencies, which depends on the proton phase space density gradient and the ambient plasma density. The gyroresonance of the observed hot protons cannot excite MS waves near the lower hybrid resonance frequency and even causes the MS wave damping. Thus, the frequencies of the observed MS waves outside the plasmapause are usually lower than the lower hybrid resonance . . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024676 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024676/full
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Authors: Yu J., Li L. Y., Cui J., Cao J. B., and Wang J.
Title: Effect of Low‐Harmonic Magnetosonic Waves on the Radiation Belt Electrons Inside the Plasmasphere
Abstract: In this paper, we presented two observational cases and simulations to indicate the relationship between the formation of butterfly‐like electron pitch angle distributions and the emission of low‐harmonic (LH) fast magnetosonic (MS) waves inside the high‐density plasmasphere. In the wave emission region, the pitch angle of relativistic (>1 MeV) electrons becomes obvious butterfly‐like distributions for both events (near‐equatorially mirroring electrons are transported to lower pitch angles). Unlike relativistic (>1 MeV) electrons, energetic electrons (<1 MeV) change slightly, except that relatively low‐energy electrons (<~150 keV) show butterfly‐like distributions in the 21 August 2013 event. In theory, the LH MS waves can affect different‐energy electrons through the bounc. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026328 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026328
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Authors: Zhao H., Baker D N, Li X, Jaynes A. N., and Kanekal S G
Title: The Effects of Geomagnetic Storms and Solar Wind Conditions on the Ultrarelativistic Electron Flux Enhancements
Abstract: Using data from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on the Van Allen Probes, the effects of geomagnetic storms and solar wind conditions on the ultrarelativistic electron (E > ~3 MeV) flux enhancements in the outer radiation belt, especially regarding their energy dependence, are investigated. It is showed that, statistically, more intense geomagnetic storms are indeed more likely to cause flux enhancements of ~1.8‐ to 7.7‐MeV electrons, though large variations exist. As the electron energy gets higher, the probability of flux enhancement gets lower. To shed light on which conditions of the storms are preferred to cause ultrarelativistic electron flux enhancement, detailed superposed epoch analyses of solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices during moderate and intense stor. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1948 - 1965 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026257 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026257
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Authors: Ripoll J.-F., Santol?k O., Reeves G., Kurth W S, Denton M., et al.
Title: Effects of whistler mode hiss waves in March 2013
Abstract: We present simulations of the loss of radiation belt electrons by resonant pitch angle diffusion caused by whistler mode hiss waves for March 2013. Pitch angle diffusion coefficients are computed from the wave properties and the ambient plasma data obtained by the Van Allen Probes with a resolution of 8 hours and 0.1 L-shell. Loss rates follow a complex dynamic structure, imposed by the wave and plasma properties. Hiss effects can be strong, with minimum lifetimes (of ~1 day) moving from energies of ~100 keV at L~5 up to ~2 MeV at L~2, and stop abruptly, similarly to the observed energy-dependent inner belt edge. Periods when the plasmasphere extends beyond L~5 favor long-lasting hiss losses from the outer belt. Such loss rates are embedded in a reduced Fokker-Planck code and validated aga. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024139 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024139/full
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Authors: Wygant J R, Bonnell J W, Goetz K, Ergun R E, Mozer F S, et al.
Title: The Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission
Abstract: The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ∼15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrume. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-0013-7 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-0013-7
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Authors: Wygant J R, Bonnell J W, Goetz K, Ergun R E, Mozer F S, et al.
Title: The Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission
Abstract: The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ∼15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrume. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-0013-7 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-0013-7
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Authors: Malaspina David M., Wygant John R., Ergun Robert E., Reeves Geoff D., Skoug Ruth M., et al.
Title: Electric field structures and waves at plasma boundaries in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Recent observations by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft have demonstrated that a variety of electric field structures and nonlinear waves frequently occur in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere, including phase space holes, kinetic field line resonances, nonlinear whistler mode waves, and several types of double layer. However, it is unclear whether such structures and waves have a significant impact on the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts and ring current. To make progress toward quantifying their importance, this study statistically evaluates the correlation of such structures and waves with plasma boundaries. A strong correlation is found. These statistical results, combined with observations of electric field activity at propagating plasma boundaries, a. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021137 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021137
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Authors: Reeves G D, Spence H E, Henderson M G, Morley S. K., Friedel R H W, et al.
Title: Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth’s magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA’s Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belt. . .
Date: 07/2013 Publisher: Science Pages: 991 - 994 DOI: 10.1126/science.1237743 Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.1237743
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Authors: Hao Y. X., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Fu S. Y., Rankin R, et al.
Title: Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ∼1MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or “dropout echoes”, constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a “drifting electron dropout” with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ∼1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons . . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069140 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069140h
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Authors: Smirnov A. G., Kronberg E. A., Latallerie F., Daly P. W., Aseev N. A., et al.
Title: Electron intensity measurements by the Cluster/RAPID/IES instrument in Earth's radiation belts and ring current
Abstract: The Cluster mission, launched in 2000, has produced a large database of electron flux intensity measurements in the Earth's magnetosphere by the Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detector (RAPID)/ Imaging Electron Spectrometer (IES) instrument. However, due to background contamination of the data with high‐energy electrons (<400 keV) and inner‐zone protons (230‐630 keV) in the radiation belts and ring current, the data have been rarely used for inner‐magnetospheric science. The current paper presents two algorithms for background correction. The first algorithm is based on the empirical contamination percentages by both protons and electrons. The second algorithm uses simultaneous proton observations. The efficiencies of these algorithms are demonstrated by comparison of the . . .
Date: 02/2019 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2018SW001989 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018SW001989
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Authors: Clilverd Mark A., Duthie Roger, Hardman Rachael, Hendry Aaron T., Rodger Craig J., et al.
Title: Electron precipitation from EMIC waves: a case study from 31 May 2013
Abstract: On 31 May 2013 several rising-tone electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves with intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods (IPDP) were observed in the magnetic local time afternoon and evening sectors during the onset of a moderate/large geomagnetic storm. The waves were sequentially observed in Finland, Antarctica, and western Canada. Co-incident electron precipitation by a network of ground-based Antarctic Arctic Radiation-belt Dynamic Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) and riometer instruments, as well as the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) electron telescopes, was also observed. At the same time POES detected 30-80 keV proton precipitation drifting westwards at locations that were consistent with the ground-based observations, i. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021090 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021090
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Authors: Ma Qianli, Li Wen, Thorne Richard M, Bortnik Jacob, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Electron scattering by magnetosonic waves in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We investigate the importance of electron scattering by magnetosonic waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. A statistical survey of the magnetosonic wave amplitude and wave frequency spectrum, as a function of geomagnetic activity, is performed using the Van Allen Probes wave measurements, and is found to be generally consistent with the wave distribution obtained from previous spacecraft missions. Outside the plasmapause the statistical frequency distribution of magnetosonic waves follows the variation of the lower hybrid resonance frequency, but this trend is not observed inside the plasmasphere. Drift and bounce averaged electron diffusion rates due to magnetosonic waves are calculated using a recently developed analytical formula. The resulting time scale of electron energization du. . .
Date: 12/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021992 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021992http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021992
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Authors: Zhang Wenxun, Fu Song, Gu Xudong, Ni Binbin, Xiang Zheng, et al.
Title: Electron Scattering by Plasmaspheric Hiss in a Nightside Plume
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in radiation belt electron dynamics in high plasma density regions. We present observations of two crossings of a plasmaspheric plume by the Van Allen Probes on 26 December 2012, which occurred unusually at the post‐midnight‐to‐dawn sector between L ~ 4–6 during a geomagnetically quiet period. This plume exhibited pronounced electron densities higher than those of the average plume level. Moderate hiss emissions accompanied the two plume crossings with the peak power at about 100 Hz. Quantification of quasi‐linear bounce‐averaged electron scattering rates by hiss in the plume demonstrates that the waves are efficient to pitch angle scatter ~10–100 keV electrons at rates up to ~10−4 s−1 near the loss cone but become gra. . .
Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077212 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077212
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Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Braun D. J., Li W, Ma Q, et al.
Title: EMIC wave events during the four GEM QARBM challenge intervals
Abstract: This paper presents observations of EMIC waves from multiple data sources during the four GEM challenge events in 2013 selected by the GEM “Quantitative Assessment of Radiation Belt Modeling” focus group: March 17‐18 (Stormtime Enhancement), May 31‐June 2 (Stormtime Dropout), September 19‐20 (Non‐storm Enhancement), and September 23‐25 (Non‐storm Dropout). Observations include EMIC wave data from the Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS spacecraft in the near‐equatorial magnetosphere and from several arrays of ground‐based search coil magnetometers worldwide, as well as localized ring current proton precipitation data from low‐altitude POES spacecraft. Each of these data sets provides only limited spatial coverage, but their combination shows consistent occurrence patte. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025505 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025505
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Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Braun D. J., Li W, Ma Q, et al.
Title: EMIC wave events during the four GEM QARBM challenge intervals
Abstract: This paper presents observations of EMIC waves from multiple data sources during the four GEM challenge events in 2013 selected by the GEM “Quantitative Assessment of Radiation Belt Modeling” focus group: March 17‐18 (Stormtime Enhancement), May 31‐June 2 (Stormtime Dropout), September 19‐20 (Non‐storm Enhancement), and September 23‐25 (Non‐storm Dropout). Observations include EMIC wave data from the Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS spacecraft in the near‐equatorial magnetosphere and from several arrays of ground‐based search coil magnetometers worldwide, as well as localized ring current proton precipitation data from low‐altitude POES spacecraft. Each of these data sets provides only limited spatial coverage, but their combination shows consistent occurrence patte. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025505 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025505
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Authors: Zhang Jichun, Halford Alexa J., Saikin Anthony A., Huang Chia-Lin, Spence Harlan E., et al.
Title: EMIC waves and associated relativistic electron precipitation on 25-26 January 2013
Abstract: Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes and the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL), we perform a case study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and associated relativistic electron precipitation (REP) observed on 25–26 January 2013. Among all the EMIC wave and REP events from the two missions, the pair of the events is the closest both in space and time. The Van Allen Probe-B detected significant EMIC waves at L = 2.1–3.9 and magnetic local time (MLT) = 21.0–23.4 for 53.5 min from 2353:00 UT, 25 January 2013. Meanwhile, BARREL-1T observed clear precipitation of relativistic electrons at L = 4.2–4.3 and MLT = 20.7–20.8 for 10.0 min from 2358 UT, 25 January 2013. Local plasma and field conditions for the excitation of the. . .
Date: 10/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022918 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022918/full
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Authors: Yu Xiongdong, Yuan Zhigang, Huang Shiyong, Wang Dedong, Li Haimeng, et al.
Title: EMIC waves covering wide L shells: MMS and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: During 04:45:00–08:15:00 UT on 13 September in 2015, a case of Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves covering wide L shells (L = 3.6–9.4), observed by the Magnotospheric Multiscale 1 (MMS1) are reported. During the same time interval, EMIC waves observed by Van Allen Probes A (VAP-A) only occurred just outside the plasmapause. As the Van Allen Probes moved outside into a more tenuous plasma region, no intense waves were observed. Combined observations of MMS1 and VAP-A suggest that in the terrestrial magnetosphere, an appropriately dense background plasma would make contributions to the growth of EMIC waves in lower L shells, while the ion anisotropy, driven by magnetospheric compression, might play an important role in the excitation of EMIC waves in higher L shells. These EMIC w. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA023982 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA023982/full
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Authors: Zhao H., Friedel R H W, Chen Y., Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: An empirical model of radiation belt electron pitch angle distributions based on Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: Based on over 4 years of Van Allen Probes measurements, an empirical model of radiation belt electron equatorial pitch angle distribution (PAD) is constructed. The model, developed by fitting electron PADs with Legendre polynomials, provides the statistical PADs as a function of L‐shell (L=1 – 6), magnetic local time (MLT), electron energy (~30 keV – 5.2 MeV), and geomagnetic activity (represented by the Dst index), and is also the first empirical PAD model in the inner belt and slot region. For MeV electrons, model results show more significant day‐night PAD asymmetry of electrons with higher energies and during disturbed times, which is caused by geomagnetic field configuration and flux radial gradient changes. Steeper PADs with higher fluxes around 90° pitch angle (PA) and lowe. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025277 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025277
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Authors: Stephens G. K., Sitnov M I, Ukhorskiy A Y, Roelof E. C., Tsyganenko N A, et al.
Title: Empirical modeling of the storm-time innermost magnetosphere using Van Allen Probes and THEMIS data: Eastward and banana currents
Abstract: The structure of storm-time currents in the inner magnetosphere, including its innermost region inside 4RE, is studied for the first time using a modification of the empirical geomagnetic field model TS07D and new data from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS missions. It is shown that the model, which uses basis-function expansions instead of ad hoc current modules to approximate the magnetic field, consistently improves its resolution and magnetic field reconstruction with the increase of the number of basis functions and resolves the spatial structure and evolution of the innermost eastward current. This includes a connection between the westward ring current flowing largely at inline image and the eastward ring current concentrated at inline image resulting in a vortex current pattern. A simil. . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021700 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021700
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Authors: Bin Kang Suk-, Fok Mei-Ching, Komar Colin, Glocer Alex, Li Wen, et al.
Title: An energetic electron flux dropout due to magnetopause shadowing on 1 June 2013
Abstract: We examine the mechanisms responsible for the dropout of energetic electron flux during 31 May – 1 June 2013, using Van Allen Probe (RBSP) electron flux data and simulations with the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model. During storm main phase, L-shells at RBSP locations are greater than ~ 8, which are connected to open drift shells. Consequently, diminished electron fluxes were observed over a wide range of energies. The combination of drift shell splitting, magnetopause shadowing and drift loss all result in butterfly electron pitch-angle distributions (PADs) at the nightside. During storm sudden commencement, RBSP observations display electron butterfly PADs over a wide range of energies. However, it is difficult to determine whether there are butterfly PADs duri. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024879 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024879/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., O'Brien T P, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere associated with substorm activity
Abstract: From a survey of the first nightside season of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission (Dec/2012 – Sep/2013), 47 energetic (10s to 100s of keV) electron injection events were found at L-shells ≤ 4, all of which are deeper than any previously reported substorm-related injections. Preliminary details from these events are presented, including how: all occurred shortly after dipolarization signatures and injections were observed at higher L-shells; the deepest observed injection was at L~2.5; and, surprisingly, L≤4 injections are limited in energy to ≤250 keV. We present a detailed case study of one example event revealing that the injection of electrons down to L~3.5 was different from injections observed at higher L and likely resulted from drift resonance with a fast magnetosonic wave in t. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063225 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063225
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Authors: Turner D. L., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., O'Brien T P, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere associated with substorm activity
Abstract: From a survey of the first nightside season of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission (Dec/2012 – Sep/2013), 47 energetic (10s to 100s of keV) electron injection events were found at L-shells ≤ 4, all of which are deeper than any previously reported substorm-related injections. Preliminary details from these events are presented, including how: all occurred shortly after dipolarization signatures and injections were observed at higher L-shells; the deepest observed injection was at L~2.5; and, surprisingly, L≤4 injections are limited in energy to ≤250 keV. We present a detailed case study of one example event revealing that the injection of electrons down to L~3.5 was different from injections observed at higher L and likely resulted from drift resonance with a fast magnetosonic wave in t. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063225 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063225
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Kunduri B. S. R., Mozer F S, and Turner D. L.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere: a result of the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) potential drop
Abstract: It has been reported that the dynamics of energetic (tens to hundreds of keV) electrons and ions is inconsistent with the theoretical picture in which the large‐scale electric field is a superposition of corotation and convection electric fields. Combining one year of measurements by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, DMSP F‐18 and the Van Allen Probes, we show that subauroral polarization streams are observed when energetic electrons have penetrated below L = 4. Outside the plasmasphere in the premidnight region, potential energy is subtracted from the total energy of ions and added to the total energy of electrons during SAPS onset. This potential energy is converted into radial motion as the energetic particles drift around Earth and leave the SAPS azimuthal sector. As a result, . . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077969 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077969
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Authors: Capannolo L., Li W, Ma Q, Shen X.‐C., Zhang X.‐J., et al.
Title: Energetic Electron Precipitation: Multievent Analysis of Its Spatial Extent During EMIC Wave Activity
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can drive precipitation of tens of keV protons and relativistic electrons, and are a potential candidate for causing radiation belt flux dropouts. In this study, we quantitatively analyze three cases of EMIC‐driven precipitation, which occurred near the dusk sector observed by multiple Low‐Earth‐Orbiting (LEO) Polar Operational Environmental Satellites/Meteorological Operational satellite programme (POES/MetOp) satellites. During EMIC wave activity, the proton precipitation occurred from few tens of keV up to hundreds of keV, while the electron precipitation was mainly at relativistic energies. We compare observations of electron precipitation with calculations using quasi‐linear theory. For all cases, we consider the effects of other magn. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026291 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026291
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Authors: Sandhu J. K., Rae I. J., Freeman M. P., Forsyth C., Gkioulidou M., et al.
Title: Energisation of the ring current by substorms
Abstract: The substorm process releases large amounts of energy into the magnetospheric system, although where the energy is transferred to and how it is partitioned remains an open question. In this study, we address whether the substorm process contributes a significant amount of energy to the ring current. The ring current is a highly variable region, and understanding the energisation processes provides valuable insight into how substorm ‐ ring current coupling may contribute to the generation of storm conditions and provide a source of energy for wave driving. In order to quantify the energy input into the ring current during the substorm process, we analyse RBSPICE and HOPE ion flux measurements for H+, O+, and He+. The energy content of the ring current is estimated and binned spatially for. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025766 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025766
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