Biblio

Found 879 results
2006
Authors: Bortnik J, Thorne R M, O’Brien T P, Green J C, Strangeway R J, et al.
Title: Observation of two distinct, rapid loss mechanisms during the 20 November 2003 radiation belt dropout event
Abstract: The relativistic electron dropout event on 20 November 2003 is studied using data from a number of satellites including SAMPEX, HEO, ACE, POES, and FAST. The observations suggest that the dropout may have been caused by two separate mechanisms that operate at high and low L-shells, respectively, with a separation at L ∼ 5. At high L-shells (L > 5), the dropout is approximately independent of energy and consistent with losses to the magnetopause aided by the Dst effect and outward radial diffusion which can deplete relativistic electrons down to lower L-shells. At low L-shells (L < 5), the dropout is strongly energy-dependent, with the higher-energy electrons being affected most. Moreover, large precipitation bands of both relativistic electrons and energetic protons are observed at low L. . .
Date: 12/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011802 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011802/abstract
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Authors: Shprits Y Y, Thorne R M, Friedel R, Reeves G D, Fennell J, et al.
Title: Outward radial diffusion driven by losses at magnetopause
Abstract: Loss mechanisms responsible for the sudden depletions of the outer electron radiation belt are examined based on observations and radial diffusion modeling, with L*-derived boundary conditions. SAMPEX data for October–December 2003 indicate that depletions often occur when the magnetopause is compressed and geomagnetic activity is high, consistent with outward radial diffusion for L* > 4 driven by loss to the magnetopause. Multichannel Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO) satellite observations show that depletions at higher L occur at energies as low as a few hundred keV, which excludes the possibility of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave-driven pitch angle scattering and loss to the atmosphere at L* > 4. We further examine the viability of the outward radial diffusion loss by comp. . .
Date: 11/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011657 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011657/abstract
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Authors: Iles Roger H A, Meredith Nigel P, Fazakerley Andrew N, and Horne Richard B
Title: Phase space density analysis of the outer radiation belt energetic electron dynamics
Abstract: We present an analysis of the electron phase space density in the Earth's outer radiation belt during three magnetically disturbed periods to determine the likely roles of inward radial diffusion and local acceleration in the energization of electrons to relativistic energies. During the recovery phase of the 9 October 1990 storm and the period of prolonged substorms between 11 and 16 September 1990, the relativistic electron phase space density increases substantially and peaks in the phase space density occur in the region 4.0 < L* < 5.5 for values of the first adiabatic invariant, M ≥ 550 MeV/G, corresponding to energies, E > ∼0.8 MeV. The peaks in the phase space density are associated with prolonged substorm activity, enhanced chorus amplitudes, and predominantly low values of the. . .
Date: 03/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2005JA011206 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2005JA011206/abstract
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Authors: Fei Yue, Chan Anthony A, Elkington Scot R, and Wiltberger Michael J
Title: Radial diffusion and MHD particle simulations of relativistic electron transport by ULF waves in the September 1998 storm
Abstract: In an MHD particle simulation of the September 1998 magnetic storm the evolution of the radiation belt electron radial flux profile appears to be diffusive, and diffusion caused by ULF waves has been invoked as the probable mechanism. In order to separate adiabatic and nonadiabatic effects and to investigate the radial diffusion mechanism during this storm, in this work we solve a radial diffusion equation with ULF wave diffusion coefficients and a time-dependent outer boundary condition, and the results are compared with the phase space density of the MHD particle simulation. The diffusion coefficients include contributions from both symmetric resonance modes (ω ≈ mωd, where ω is the wave frequency, m is the azimuthal wave number, and ωd is the bounce-averaged drift frequency) and . . .
Date: 12/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2005JA011211 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2005JA011211/abstract
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Authors: Elkington Scot R, Takahashi K, Chi Peter J, Denton Richard E, and Lysak Robert L
Title: A review of ULF interactions with radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Energetic particle fluxes in the outer zone radiation belts can vary over orders of magnitude on a variety of timescales. Power at ULF frequencies, on the order of a few millihertz, have been associated with changes in flux levels among relativis- tic electrons comprising the outer zone of the radiation belts. Power in this part of the spectrum may occur as a result of a number of processes, including internally- generated waves induced by plasma instabilities, and externally generated processes such as shear instabilities at the flanks or compressive variations in the solar wind. Changes in the large-scale convective motion of the magnetosphere are another important class of externally driven variations with power at ULF wavelengths. The mechanism for interaction between ULF vari. . .
Date: Publisher: American Geophysical Union Pages: 177 - 193 DOI: 10.1029/169GM12 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/169GM12/summary
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Authors: Sarris T, Li X, and Temerin M
Title: Simulating radial diffusion of energetic (MeV) electrons through a model of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields
Abstract: In the present work, a test particle simulation is performed in a model of analytic Ultra Low Frequency, ULF, perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields of the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of this work is to examine if the radial transport of energetic particles in quiet-time ULF magnetospheric perturbations of various azimuthal mode numbers can be described as a diffusive process and be approximated by theoretically derived radial diffusion coefficients. In the model realistic compressional electromagnetic field perturbations are constructed by a superposition of a large number of propagating electric and consistent magnetic pulses. The diffusion rates of the electrons under the effect of the fluctuating fields are calculated numerically through the test-particle simulation as a. . .
Date: 10/2006 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 2583 - 2598 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-24-2583-2006 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/24/2583/2006/angeo-24-2583-2006.html
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Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Anderson B J, Brandt P C, and Tsyganenko N A
Title: Storm time evolution of the outer radiation belt: Transport and losses
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms the magnetic field of the inner magnetosphere exhibits large-scale variations over timescales from minutes to days. Being mainly controlled by the magnetic field the motion of relativistic electrons of the outer radiation belt can be highly susceptible to its variations. This paper investigates evolution of the outer belt during the 7 September 2002 storm. Evolution of electron phase space density is calculated with the use of a test-particle simulation in storm time magnetic and electric fields. The results show that storm time intensification of the ring current produces a large impact on the belt. In contrast to the conventional Dst effect the dominant effects are nonadiabatic and lead to profound and irreversible transformations of the belt. The diamagnetic in. . .
Date: 11/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011690 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011690/abstract
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Authors: Baker Daniel N., and Lanzerotti Louis
Title: Where Are the "Killer Electrons" of the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 23
Abstract: “Killer electrons,” enhanced fluxes of radiation belt electrons in the magnetosphere–especially those at geosynchronous orbit (GEO)–were an important space weather phenomenon during the decline to minimum of the last 11-year solar cycle (1993–1995). Indeed, the fluxes of these electrons were reported at the time to have significantly influenced the incidence of anomalies on numerous spacecraft, both commercial and national defense. The incidences of spacecraft anomalies and the “pumping up” of the GEO electron fluxes gave rise to the picture that solar minimum did not provide a benign environment for space-based technologies as had been assumed by many. The decline to minimum of this current (23th) solar cycle has as yet to produce the same number of reported spacecra. . .
Date: 07/2006 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2006SW000259 Available at: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2006SW000259.shtml
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2007
Authors: Li W, Shprits Y Y, and Thorne R M
Title: Dynamic evolution of energetic outer zone electrons due to wave-particle interactions during storms
Abstract: [1] Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt are subjected to pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), and hiss waves. Using quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for cyclotron resonance with field-aligned waves, we examine whether the resonant interactions with chorus waves produce a net acceleration or loss of relativistic electrons. We also examine the effect of pitch angle scattering by EMIC and hiss waves during the main and recovery phases of a storm. The numerical simulations show that wave-particle interactions with whistler mode chorus waves with realistic wave spectral properties result in a net acceleration of relativistic electrons, while EMIC waves, which provide very fast scattering near the edge of the loss cone, may be a domi. . .
Date: 10/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2007JA012368 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007JA012368/full
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Authors: Degeling A W, Rankin R, Kabin K, Marchand R, and Mann I R
Title: The effect of ULF compressional modes and field line resonances on relativistic electron dynamics
Abstract: The adiabatic, drift-resonant interaction between relativistic, equatorially mirroring electrons and a ULF compressional wave that couples to a field line resonance (FLR) is modelled. Investigations are focussed on the effect of azimuthal localisation in wave amplitude on the electron dynamics. The ULF wave fields on the equatorial plane (r , φ ) are modelled using a box model [Zhu, X., Kivelson, M.G., 1988. Analytic formulation and quantitative solutions of the coupled ULF wave problem. J. Geophys. Res. 93(A8), 8602–8612], and azimuthal variations are introduced by adding a discrete spectrum of azimuthal modes. Electron trajectories are calculated using drift equations assuming constant magnetic moment M , and the evolution of the distribution function f(r,φ,M,t) from an assumed in. . .
Date: 04/2007 Publisher: Planetary and Space Science Pages: 731 - 742 DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2006.04.039 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032063306002893
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Authors: Chen Yue, Reeves Geoffrey D, and Friedel Reiner H W
Title: The energization of relativistic electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt
Abstract: The origin and dynamics of the Van Allen radiation belts is one of the longest-standing questions of the space age, and one that is increasingly important for space applications as satellite systems become more sophisticated, smaller and more susceptible to radiation effects. The precise mechanism by which the Earth's magnetosphere is able to accelerate electrons from thermal to ultrarelativistic energies (Edouble greater than0.5 MeV) has been particularly difficult to definitively resolve. The traditional explanation is that large-scale, fluctuating electric and magnetic fields energize particles through radial diffusion1. More recent theories2, 3 and observations4, 5 have suggested that gyro-resonant wave–particle interactions may be comparable to or more important than radial diffusio. . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Nature Physics Pages: 614 - 617 DOI: 10.1038/nphys655 Available at: http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v3/n9/full/nphys655.html
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Authors: Kress B T, Hudson M K, Looper M D, Albert J, Lyon J G, et al.
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement
Abstract: [1] Prior to 2003, there are two known cases where ultrarelativistic (≳10 MeV) electrons appeared in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts in association with high speed interplanetary shocks: the 24 March 1991 and the less well studied 21 February 1994 storms. During the March 1991 event electrons were injected well into the inner zone on a timescale of minutes, producing a new stably trapped radiation belt population that persisted for ∼10 years. More recently, at the end of solar cycle 23, a number of violent geomagnetic disturbances resulted in large variations in ultrarelativistic electrons in the inner zone, indicating that these events are less rare than previously thought. Here we present results from a numerical study of shock-induced transport and energization of outer zone . . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012218 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012218/abstract
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Authors: Reeves Geoffrey D
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes: The Next Generation of Space Weather Forecasting
Abstract: N/A
Date: 11/2007 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2007SW000341 Available at: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2007/2007SW000341.shtml
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Authors: Thorne R M, Shprits Y Y, Meredith N P, Horne R B, Li W, et al.
Title: Refilling of the slot region between the inner and outer electron radiation belts during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: [1] Energetic electrons (≥50 keV) are injected into the slot region (2 < L < 4) between the inner and outer radiation belts during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms. Enhanced convection from the plasma sheet can account for the storm-time injection at lower energies but does not explain the rapid appearance of higher-energy electrons (≥150 keV). The effectiveness of either radial diffusion (driven by enhanced ULF waves) or local acceleration (during interactions with enhanced whistler mode chorus emissions), as a potential source for refilling the slot at higher energies, is analyzed for observed conditions during the early recovery phase of the 10 October 1990 storm. We demonstrate that local acceleration, driven by observed chorus emissions, can account for the rapid enh. . .
Date: 06/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012176 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012176/abstract
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Authors: MILLAN R, and THORNE R
Title: Review of radiation belt relativistic electron losses
Abstract: We present a brief review of radiation belt electron losses which are vitally important for controlling the dynamics of the radiation belts. A historical overview of early observations is presented, followed by a brief description of important known electron loss mechanisms. We describe key theoretical results and observations related to pitch-angle scattering by resonant interaction with plasmaspheric hiss, whistler-mode chorus and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and review recent work on magnetopause losses. In particular, we attempt to organize recent observational data by loss mechanism and their relative importance to the overall rate of loss. We conclude by suggesting future observational and theoretical work that would contribute to our understanding of this important area of r. . .
Date: 03/2007 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 362 - 377 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2006.06.019 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682606002768
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Authors: Meredith Nigel P, Horne Richard B, Glauert Sarah A, and Anderson Roger R
Title: Slot region electron loss timescales due to plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers
Abstract: [1] Energetic electrons (E > 100 keV) in the Earth's radiation belts undergo Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonant interactions with a variety of whistler mode waves leading to pitch angle scattering and subsequent loss to the atmosphere. In this study we assess the relative importance of plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers in the slot region and beyond. Electron loss timescales are determined using the Pitch Angle and energy Diffusion of Ions and Electrons (PADIE) code with global models of the spectral distributions of the wave power based on CRRES observations. Our results show that plasmaspheric hiss propagating at small and intermediate wave normal angles is a significant scattering agent in the slot region and beyond. In contrast, plasmaspheric hiss propagating at large. . .
Date: 08/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2007JA012413 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007JA012413/abstract
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Authors: Summers D., Ni Binbin, and Meredith Nigel P
Title: Timescales for radiation belt electron acceleration and loss due to resonant wave-particle interactions: 1. Theory
Abstract: Radiation belt electrons can interact with various modes of plasma wave in their drift orbits about the Earth, including whistler-mode chorus outside the plasmasphere, and both whistler-mode hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves inside the plasmasphere. Electrons undergo gyroresonant diffusion in their interactions with these waves. To determine the timescales for electron momentum diffusion and pitch angle diffusion, we develop bounce-averaged quasi-linear resonant diffusion coefficients for field-aligned electromagnetic waves in a hydrogen or multi-ion (H+, He+, O+) plasma. We assume that the Earth's magnetic field is dipolar and that the wave frequency spectrum is Gaussian. Evaluation of the diffusion coefficients requires the solution of a sixth-order polynomial equation for the. . .
Date: 04/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011801 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011801/abstract
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2008
Authors: KRESS B, Hudson M K, LOOPER M, LYON J, and GOODRICH C
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of solar energetic electron trapping in the Earth’s radiation belts
Abstract: Test-particle trajectories are computed in fields from a global MHD magnetospheric model simulation of the 29 October 2003 Storm Commencement to investigate trapping and transport of solar energetic electrons (SEEs) in the magnetosphere during severe storms. SEEs are found to provide a source population for a newly formed belt of View the MathML source electrons in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts, which was observed following the 29 October 2003 storm. Energy and pitch angle distributions of the new belt are compared with results previously obtained [Kress, B.T., Hudson, M.K., Looper, M.D., Albert, J., Lyon, J.G., Goodrich, C.C., 2007. Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, A0921. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1727 - 1737 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.05.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001338
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Authors: UKHORSKIY A, and SITNOV M
Title: Radial transport in the outer radiation belt due to global magnetospheric compressions
Abstract: Earth's outer radiation belt is populated by relativistic electrons that produce a complex dynamical response to varying geomagnetic activity. One fundamental process defining global state of the belt is radial transport of electrons across their drift shells. Radial transport is induced by resonant interaction of electron drift motion with ULF oscillations of electric and magnetic fields and is commonly believed to be a diffusive process. The goal of this paper is the analysis of radial transport due to typical ULF fluctuations in the inner magnetospheric fields. For this purpose a test-particle approach is used in the guiding center approximation. In particular we consider ULF oscillations due to global magnetospheric compressions. It is shown that typical pressure variations induce larg. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1714 - 1726 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001971
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Authors: Jordanova V K, Albert J, and Miyoshi Y
Title: Relativistic electron precipitation by EMIC waves from self-consistent global simulations
Abstract: [1] We study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering on radiation belt electrons during the large geomagnetic storm of 21 October 2001 with minimum Dst = −187 nT. We use our global physics-based model, which solves the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons and H+, O+, and He+ ions as a function of radial distance in the equatorial plane, magnetic local time, energy, and pitch angle. The model includes time-dependent convective transport and radial diffusion and all major loss processes and is coupled with a dynamic plasmasphere model. We calculate the excitation of EMIC waves self-consistently with the evolving plasma populations. Particle interactions with these waves are evaluated according to quasi-linear theory, using diffusion coefficients for a mult. . .
Date: 03/2008 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013239 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2008JA013239/abstract
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Authors: Degeling A W, and Rankin R
Title: Resonant drift echoes in electron phase space density produced by dayside Pc5 waves following a geomagnetic storm
Abstract: [1] The interaction between relativistic, equatorially mirroring electrons and Pc5 Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere is investigated using a numerical MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) model for waves and a test-kinetic model for electron phase space density (PSD). The temporal and spatial characteristics of a ULF wave packet are constrained using ground-based observations of narrowband ULF activity following a geomagnetic storm on 24 March 1991, which occurred from 1200 to 1340 Universal Time (UT). A salient feature of the ULF waves during this interval was the apparent localization of the ULF wave power to the dayside of the magnetosphere and the antisunward propagation of ULF wave phase in the morning and afternoon sectors. This is interpreted to imply a localized source of U. . .
Date: 10/2008 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013254 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2008JA013254/abstract
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Authors: SHPRITS Y, ELKINGTON S, MEREDITH N, and SUBBOTIN D
Title: Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt I: Radial transport
Abstract: In this paper, we focus on the modeling of radial transport in the Earth's outer radiation belt. A historical overview of the first observations of the radiation belts is presented, followed by a brief description of radial diffusion. We describe how resonant interactions with poloidal and toroidal components of the ULF waves can change the electron's energy and provide radial displacements. We also present radial diffusion and guiding center simulations that show the importance of radial transport in redistributing relativistic electron fluxes and also in accelerating and decelerating radiation belt electrons. We conclude by presenting guiding center simulations of the coupled particle tracing and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes and by discussing the origin of relativistic electrons at ge. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1679 - 1693 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.06.008 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001648
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Authors: SHPRITS Y, SUBBOTIN D, MEREDITH N, and ELKINGTON S
Title: Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt II: Local acceleration and loss
Abstract: This paper focuses on the modeling of local acceleration and loss processes in the outer radiation belt. We begin by reviewing the statistical properties of waves that violate the first and second adiabatic invariants, leading to the loss and acceleration of high energy electrons in the outer radiation belt. After a brief description of the most commonly accepted methodology for computing quasi-linear diffusion coefficients, we present pitch-angle scattering simulations by (i) plasmaspheric hiss, (ii) a combination of plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, (iii) chorus waves, and (iv) a combination of chorus and EMIC waves. Simulations of the local acceleration and loss processes show that statistically, the net effect of chorus waves is acceleration at MeV ener. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1694 - 1713 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.06.014 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001673
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2009
Authors: Kemp Brian L, McGee Timothy G, and Shankar Uday J
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 1: Derivation of Nonlinear Dynamics
Abstract: Algebraic expressions for the governing equations of motion are developed to describe a spinning spacecraft with flexible appendages. Two limiting cases are investigated: appendages that are self-restoring and appendages that require spacecraft motion to restore. Solar panels have sufficient root stiffness to self-restore perturbations. Radial wire antennae have little intrinsic root stiffness and require centripetal acceleration from spacecraft rotations to restore perturbations. External forces applied for attitude corrections can displace spacecraft appendages from their steady-state position. The Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) satellite is used as an example to explore numerical results for several maneuvers.
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6202 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6202
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Authors: McGee Timothy G, Shankar Uday J, and Kemp Brian L
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 2: Out-of-Plane Dynamics and Maneuvers
Abstract: An analysis of the dynamics for a spin stabilized spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub with four long exible wire booms is presented. The analysis focuses on the dynamics out of the spin plane of the spacecraft. Companion papers will focus on the derivations of the full nonlinear dynamics and analysis of the in plane dynamics. A linear analysis is used to estimate the mode shapes of the free response of the system, the e ects of various damping mechanisms on these modes, and the dynamic response of the system to various maneuvers. The results of an independent simulation of the full nonlinear dynamics of the system are also provided to support the linear analysis. While the dynamics and analysis approach presented can be applied to the general class of spin stabilized space. . .
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6203 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6203
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Authors: Shankar Uday J, McGee Timothy G, and Kemp Brian L
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 3: Spin-Plane Dynamics, Maneuvers, and Deployment
Abstract: Several science spacecraft use long wire booms as electric-field antennas and the spacecraft spins to maintain the orientation of these flexible wires. These booms account for a majority of the total spacecraft inertia while weighing only a small fraction of the total mass. The spacecraft dynamics is therefore dominated by these booms. The analysis of such spacecraft is further complicated by other flexible ap- pendages and the presence of damping in the system, both inherent in the sys- tem and from damping mechanisms deliberately added into the system. This pa- per and two companion papers analyze such spacecraft. The first of these derives the governing nonlinear equations from first principles. Under certain conditions, the dynamics neatly separate into spin-plane and out-of-p. . .
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6204 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6204
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Authors: Ohtani S, Miyoshi Y, Singer H J, and Weygand J M
Title: On the loss of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous altitude: Its dependence on magnetic configurations and external conditions
Abstract: [1] The present study statistically examines geosynchronous magnetic configurations and external conditions that characterize the loss of geosynchronous MeV electrons. The loss of MeV electrons often takes place during magnetospheric storms, but it also takes place without any clear storm activity. It is found that irrespective of storm activity, the day-night asymmetry of the geosynchronous H (north-south) magnetic component is pronounced during electron loss events. For the loss process, the magnitude, rather than the duration, of the magnetic distortion appears to be important, and its effective duration can be as short as ∼30 min. The solar wind dynamic pressure tends to be high and interplanetary magnetic field BZ tends to be southward during electron loss events. Under such externa. . .
Date: 01/2009 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013391 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2008JA013391/full
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2010
Authors: Min Kyungguk, Lee Jeongwoo, and Keika Kunihiro
Title: Chorus wave generation near the dawnside magnetopause due to drift shell splitting of substorm-injected electrons
Abstract: We study the relationship between the electron injection and the chorus waves during a substorm event on 23 March 2007. The chorus waves were detected at high geomagnetic latitude (∼70°S) Antarctic observatories in the range of 0600–0900 h in magnetic local time (MLT). Electrons drifting from the injection event were measured by two LANL spacecraft at 0300 and 0900 MLT. The mapping of auroral brightening areas to the magnetic equator shows that the injection occurred in an MLT range of 2200–2400. This estimate is consistent with observations by the THEMIS A, B, and D spacecraft (which were located at 2100 MLT and did not observe electron injections). Our backward model tracing from the magnetic equator near the dawnside magnetopause (which magnetically connects to the Antar. . .
Date: 10/2010 Publisher: American Geophysical Union DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015474
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2011
Authors: Ukhorskiy Aleksandr Y., Mauk Barry H., Fox Nicola J., Sibeck David G., and Grebowsky Joseph M.
Title: Radiation belt storm probes: Resolving fundamental physics with practical consequences
Abstract: The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.
Date: 07/2011 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1417 - 1424 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2010.12.005 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682610003688
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Authors: Millan R.M.
Title: Understanding relativistic electron losses with BARREL
Abstract: The primary scientific objective of the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) is to understand the processes responsible for scattering relativistic electrons into Earth's atmosphere. BARREL is the first Living with a Star Geospace Mission of Opportunity, and will consist of two Antarctic balloon campaigns conducted in the 2012 and 2013 Austral summer seasons. During each campaign, a total of 20 small View the MathML source(∼20kg) balloon payloads will be launched, providing multi-point measurements of electron precipitation in conjunction with in situ measurements from the two RBSP spacecraft, scheduled to launch in May 2012. In this paper we outline the scientific objectives of BARREL, highlighting a few key science questions that will be addressed by BARREL in c. . .
Date: 07/2011 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1425 - 1434 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.006 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682611000071
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2012
Authors: Bushman Stewart
Title: Design, Fabrication, and Testing of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Propulsion Systems
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft , part of NASA’s Living with a Star program, are scheduled for launch into Earth orbit in August 2012. 1,2,3 The twin spacecraft possess identical blowdown monopropellant hydrazine propulsion systems to provide spinup/spindown, precession, Delt a–V, and deorbit capability. Each spacecraft manifests eight Aerojet 0.2 lbf (0.9 N) MR–103G thrust ers, three ARDÉ Inconel 718 propellant tanks, and other components required to control the fl ow of propellant and monitor system health and performance. The propulsion systems were fabricated and installed by Aerojet Redmond and subsequently tested at the Jo hns Hopkins University / Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, MD. The test se quence at APL included thermal balance; . . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/6.2012-4332 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2012-4332
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Authors: Brito T, Woodger L, Hudson M K, and MILLAN R
Title: Energetic radiation belt electron precipitation showing ULF modulation
Abstract: 1] The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere. This study considers the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 period range (45 s–600 s) on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of several minutes. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of these ∼MeV energetic particles. ACE satellite measurements of the MHD solar wind parameters are used as the upstream boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields, used to drive elec. . .
Date: 11/2012 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 28 DOI: 10.1029/2012GL053790 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012GL053790/full
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Authors: Turner Drew L, Shprits Yuri, Hartinger Michael, and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Explaining sudden losses of outer radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts were first discovered in 1958 by the Explorer series of spacecraft1. The dynamic outer belt consists primarily of relativistic electrons trapped by the Earth’s magnetic field. Magnetospheric processes driven by the solar wind2 cause the electron flux in this belt to fluctuate substantially over timescales ranging from minutes to years3. The most dramatic of these events are known as flux ’dropouts’ and often occur during geomagnetic storms. During such an event the electron flux can drop by several orders of magnitude in just a few hours4, 5 and remain low even after a storm has abated. Various solar wind phenomena, including coronal mass ejections and co-rotating interaction regions6, can drive storm activity, but several outstanding questions remain co. . .
Date: 01/2012 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Pages: 208–212 DOI: 10.1038/nphys2185 Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2185
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Authors: Min Kyungguk, Lee Jeongwoo, Keika Kunihiro, and Li W
Title: Global distribution of EMIC waves derived from THEMIS observations
Abstract: [1] Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in magnetospheric dynamics and their global distribution has been of great interest. This paper presents the distribution of EMIC waves over a broader range than ever before, as enabled by observations with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft from 2007 to 2010. Our major findings are: (1) There are two major peaks in the EMIC wave occurrence probability. One is at dusk and 8–12 RE where the helium band dominates the hydrogen band waves. The other is at dawn and 10–12 RE where the hydrogen band dominates the helium band waves. (2) In terms of wave spectral power the dusk events are stronger (≈10 nT2/Hz) than the dawn events (≈3 nT2/Hz). (3) The dawn . . .
Date: 05/2012 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2012JA017515
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Authors: Jordanova V K, Welling D T, Zaharia S G, Chen L, and Thorne R M
Title: Modeling ring current ion and electron dynamics and plasma instabilities during a high-speed stream driven storm
Abstract: 1] The temporal and spatial development of the ring current is evaluated during the 23–26 October 2002 high-speed stream (HSS) storm, using a kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB). The effects of nondipolar magnetic field configuration are investigated on both ring current ion and electron dynamics. As the self-consistent magnetic field is depressed at large (>4RE) radial distances on the nightside during the storm main phase, the particles' drift velocities increase, the ion and electron fluxes are reduced and the ring current is confined closer to Earth. In contrast to ions, the electron fluxes increase closer to Earth and the fractional electron energy reaches ∼20% near storm peak due to better electron trapping in a nondipo. . .
Date: 09/2012 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 1978–2012 DOI: 10.1029/2011JA017433 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2011JA017433/full
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Authors: Hudson M K, Brito Thiago, Elkington Scot, Kress Brian, Li Zhao, et al.
Title: Radiation belt 2D and 3D simulations for CIR-driven storms during Carrington Rotation 2068
Abstract: As part of the International Heliospheric Year, the Whole Heliosphere Interval, Carrington Rotation 2068, from March 20 to April 16, 2008 was chosen as an internationally coordinated observing and modeling campaign. A pair of solar wind structures identified as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR), characteristic of the declining phase of the solar cycle and solar minimum, was identified in solar wind plasma measurements from the ACE satellite. Such structures have previously been determined to be geoeffective in producing enhanced outer zone radiation belt electron fluxes, on average greater than at solar maximum. MHD fields from the Coupled Magnetosphere–Ionosphere–Thermosphere (CMIT) model driven by ACE solar wind measurements at L1 have been used to drive both 2D and 3D weighted te. . .
Date: 07/2012 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 51 - 62 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2012.03.017 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612001010
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, Fretz Kristen, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design
Abstract: NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning spacecraft in an elliptical orbit around earth from 600 km perigee to 30,000 km apogee at 10 degree inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin spacecraft will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other 4 times per year; this offers simultaneous meas. . .
Date: 03/2012 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06187020
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Authors: Butler Michael, and Laughery Sean
Title: The RBSP Spacecraft Power System Design and Development
Abstract: The RBSP (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin spacecraft are set to launch in August 2012. The spacecraft will be inserted into the highly elliptical regions of high energy particles trapped by the magnetic field of the earth. These regions are often referred to as the Van Allen Belts. The twin spacecraft will operate entirely within the radiation belts throughout their mission. Because of the intense environment of operation and to reduce cost and risk, the approach taken in the power system electronics was to use quasi conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques encased in a 350mil thick aluminum enclosure. The spacecraft are spin stabilized with an axial boom that creates a shadow across the solar arrays. The power system topology selected was a 28V unregulat. . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MIECEC1210.2514/6.2012-4059 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2012-4059
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Authors: Crabtree C., Rudakov L., Ganguli G., Mithaiwala M., Galinsky V., et al.
Title: Weak turbulence in the magnetosphere: Formation of whistler wave cavity by nonlinear scattering
Abstract: We consider the weak turbulence of whistler waves in the in low-β inner magnetosphere of the earth. Whistler waves, originating in the ionosphere, propagate radially outward and can trigger nonlinear induced scattering by thermal electrons provided the wave energy density is large enough. Nonlinear scattering can substantially change the direction of the wave vector of whistler waves and hence the direction of energy flux with only a small change in the frequency. A portion of whistler waves return to the ionosphere with a smaller perpendicular wave vector resulting in diminished linear damping and enhanced ability to pitch-angle scatter trapped electrons. In addition, a portion of the scatteredwave packets can be reflected near the ionosphere back into the magnetosphere. Through multiple. . .
Date: 01/2012 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas Pages: 032903 DOI: 10.1063/1.3692092 Available at: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/19/3/10.1063/1.3692092
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2013
Authors: Ginet G P, ’Brien T P, Huston S L, Johnston W R, Guild T B, et al.
Title: AE9, AP9 and SPM: New Models for Specifying the Trapped Energetic Particle and Space Plasma Environment
Abstract: The radiation belts and plasma in the Earth’s magnetosphere pose hazards to satellite systems which restrict design and orbit options with a resultant impact on mission performance and cost. For decades the standard space environment specification used for spacecraft design has been provided by the NASA AE8 and AP8 trapped radiation belt models. There are well-known limitations on their performance, however, and the need for a new trapped radiation and plasma model has been recognized by the engineering community for some time. To address this challenge a new set of models, denoted AE9/AP9/SPM, for energetic electrons, energetic protons and space plasma has been developed. The new models offer significant improvements including more detailed spatial resolution and the quantification of u. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9964-y Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9964-y
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Authors: Mauk B H
Title: Analysis of EMIC-wave-moderated flux limitation of measured energetic ion spectra in multispecies magnetospheric plasmas
Abstract: A differential Kennel-Petschek (KP) flux limit for magnetospheric energetic ions is devised taking into account multiple ion species effects on electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves that scatter the ions. The idea is that EMIC waves may limit the highest ion intensities during acceleration phases of storms and substorms (~ hour) while other mechanisms (e.g., charge exchange) may account for losses below those limits and over longer periods of time. This approach is applied to published Earth magnetosphere energetic ion spectra (~ keV to ~1 MeV) for radial positions (L) 3 to 6.7 RE. The flatness of the most intense spectral shapes for <100 keV indicate sculpting by just such a mechanism, but modifications of traditional KP parameters are needed to account for maximum fluxes up to 5. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3804 - 3808 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50789 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50789
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Authors: Shprits Yuri, Kellerman Adam, Kondrashov Dmitri, and Subbotin Dmitriy
Title: Application of a new data operator-splitting data assimilation technique to the 3-D VERB diffusion code and CRRES measurements
Abstract: In this study we present 3-D data assimilation using CRRES data and 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt Model (VERB) using a newly developed operator-splitting method. Simulations with synthetic data show that the operator-splitting Kalman filtering technique proposed in this study can successfully reconstruct the underlying dynamic evolution of the radiation belts. The method is further verified by the comparison with the conventional Kalman filter. We applied the new approach to 3-D data assimilation of real data to globally reconstruct the dynamics of the radiation belts using pitch angle, energy, and L shell dependent CRRES observations. An L shell time cross section of the global data assimilation results for nearly equatorially mirroring particles and high and low values of the fir. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4998 - 5002 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50969 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50969
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Authors: Millan R M, McCarthy M P, Sample J G, Smith D M, Thompson L D, et al.
Title: The Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL)
Abstract: BARREL is a multiple-balloon investigation designed to study electron losses from Earth’s Radiation Belts. Selected as a NASA Living with a Star Mission of Opportunity, BARREL augments the Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission by providing measurements of relativistic electron precipitation with a pair of Antarctic balloon campaigns that will be conducted during the Austral summers (January-February) of 2013 and 2014. During each campaign, a total of 20 small (∼20 kg) stratospheric balloons will be successively launched to maintain an array of ∼5 payloads spread across ∼6 hours of magnetic local time in the region that magnetically maps to the radiation belts. Each balloon carries an X-ray spectrometer to measure the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by precipitating relativistic electr. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9971-z Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9971-z
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Authors: Lee Jeongwoo, Min Kyungguk, and Kim Kap-Sung
Title: Characteristic dimension of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave activity in the magnetosphere
Abstract: [1] In this paper, we estimate the size of coherent activity of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves using the multi‒spacecraft observations made during the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. We calculate the cross‒correlations between EMIC wave powers measured by different THEMIS spacecraft, plot them over the separation distances between pairs of observing spacecraft, and determine the 1/e folding distance of the correlations as the characteristic dimension of the coherent wave activity. The characteristic radius in the direction transverse to the local magnetic field is found to lie in rather a wide range of 1500–8600 km varying from the AM to PM sectors and also from hydrogen to helium bands. However, the characteristic d. . .
Date: 04/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1651 - 1658 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50242 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.50242
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Authors: Rodger Craig J., Kavanagh Andrew J., Clilverd Mark A., and Marple Steve R.
Title: Comparison between POES energetic electron precipitation observations and riometer absorptions: Implications for determining true precipitation fluxes
Abstract: Energetic electron precipitation (EEP) impacts the chemistry of the middle atmosphere with growing evidence of coupling to surface temperatures at high latitudes. To better understand this link, it is essential to have realistic observations to properly characterize precipitation and which can be incorporated into chemistry-climate models. The Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) detectors measure precipitating particles but only integral fluxes and only in a fraction of the bounce loss cone. Ground-based riometers respond to precipitation from the whole bounce loss cone; they measure the cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA), a qualitative proxy with scant direct information on the energy flux of EEP. POES observations should have a direct relationship with ΔCNA and co. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7810 - 7821 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019439 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019439
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Green J C, et al.
Title: Constructing the global distribution of chorus wave intensity using measurements of electrons by the POES satellites and waves by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We adopt a physics-based technique to infer chorus wave amplitudes from the low-altitude electron population (30–100 keV) measured by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage over a broad region in L-shell and magnetic local time (MLT). This technique is validated by analyzing conjunction events between the Van Allen Probes measuring chorus wave amplitudes near the equator and POES satellites measuring the 30–100 keV electron population at the conjugate low altitudes. We apply this technique to construct the chorus wave distributions during the 8–9 October storm in 2012 and demonstrate that the inferred chorus wave amplitudes agree reasonably well with conjugate measurements of chorus wave amplitudes from the Van Allen Probes. The . . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4526 - 4532 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v40.1710.1002/grl.50920 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.v40.17http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50920
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Authors: Whittaker Ian C., Gamble Rory J., Rodger Craig J., Clilverd Mark A., and Sauvaud é
Title: Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times
Abstract: The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electron spectra from DEMETER have been analyzed from all six years of its operation, and three fit types (power law, exponential, and kappa-type) have been applied to the precipitating flux observations. We show that the power law fit consistently provides the best representation of the flux and that the ka. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7611 - 7623 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019228 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019228
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Authors: Mann Ian R., Lee E. A., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Degeling A., et al.
Title: Discovery of the action of a geophysical synchrotron in the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Although the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts were discovered over 50 years ago, the dominant processes responsible for relativistic electron acceleration, transport and loss remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for the action of coherent acceleration due to resonance with ultra-low frequency waves on a planetary scale. Data from the CRRES probe, and from the recently launched multi-satellite NASA Van Allen Probes mission, with supporting modeling, collectively show coherent ultra-low frequency interactions which high energy resolution data reveals are far more common than either previously thought or observed. The observed modulations and energy-dependent spatial structure indicate a mode of action analogous to a geophysical synchrotron; this new mode of response represents . . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Nature Communications DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3795 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms3795
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Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, and Sitnov M I
Title: Dynamics of Radiation Belt Particles
Abstract: This paper reviews basic concepts of particle dynamics underlying theoretical aspect of radiation belt modeling and data analysis. We outline the theory of adiabatic invariants of quasiperiodic Hamiltonian systems and derive the invariants of particle motion trapped in the radiation belts. We discuss how the nonlinearity of resonant interaction of particles with small-amplitude plasma waves, ubiquitous across the inner magnetosphere, can make particle motion stochastic. Long-term evolution of a stochastic system can be described by the Fokker-Plank (diffusion) equation. We derive the kinetic equation of particle diffusion in the invariant space and discuss its limitations and associated challenges which need to be addressed in forthcoming radiation belt models and data analysis.
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 545-578 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9938-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9938-5
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Authors: Schultz Colin
Title: Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere
Abstract: Trapped by Earth's magnetic field far above the planet's surface, the energetic particles that fill the radiation belts are a sign of the Sun's influence and a threat to our technological future. In the AGU monograph Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere, editors Danny Summers, Ian R. Mann, Daniel N. Baker, and Michael Schulz explore the inner workings of the magnetosphere. The book reviews current knowledge of the magnetosphere and recent research results and sets the stage for the work currently being done by NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes). In this interview, Eos talks to Summers about magnetospheric research, whistler mode waves, solar storms, and the effects of the radiation belts on Earth.
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union Pages: 509 - 509 DOI: 10.1002/eost.v94.5210.1002/2013EO520007 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eost.v94.52http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013EO520007
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