Biblio

Found 879 results
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Q
Authors: Liu Si, Yan Qi, Yang Chang, Zhou Qinghua, He Zhaoguo, et al.
Title: Quantifying Extremely Rapid Flux Enhancements of Radiation Belt Relativistic Electrons Associated With Radial Diffusion
Abstract: Previous studies have revealed a typical picture that seed electrons are transported inward under the drive of radial diffusion and then accelerated via chorus to relativistic energies. Here we show a potentially different process during the 2–3 October 2013 storm when Van Allen Probes observed extremely rapid (by about 50 times in 2 h) flux enhancements of relativistic (1.8–3.4 MeV) electrons but without distinct chorus at lower L-shells. Meanwhile, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites simultaneously measured enhanced chorus and fluxes of energetic (∼100–300 keV) seed electrons at higher L-shells. Numerical calculations show that chorus can efficiently accelerate seed electrons at L ∼ 8.3. Then radial diffusion further increased the phas. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1262 - 1270 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v45.310.1002/2017GL076513 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076513/full
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Nishimura Y., et al.
Title: Quantifying hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation: A detailed conjunction event analysis
Abstract: We analyze a conjunction event between the Van Allen Probes and the low-altitude Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) to quantify hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation. A physics-based technique based on quasi-linear diffusion theory is used to estimate the ratio of precipitated and trapped electron fluxes (R), which could be measured by the two-directional POES particle detectors, using wave and plasma parameters observed by the Van Allen Probes. The remarkable agreement between modeling and observations suggests that this technique is applicable for quantifying hiss-driven electron scattering near the bounce loss cone. More importantly, R in the 100–300 keV energy channel measured by multiple POES satellites over a broad L magnetic local time region can potentially pr. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1085 - 1092 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059132 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059132
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Authors: Boyd A. J., Spence H E, Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Quantifying the radiation belt seed population in the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event
Abstract: We present phase space density (PSD) observations using data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument on the Van Allen Probes for the 17 March 2013 electron acceleration event. We confirm previous results and quantify how PSD gradients depend on the first adiabatic invariant. We find a systematic difference between the lower-energy electrons (1 MeV with a source region within the radiation belts. Our observations show that the source process begins with enhancements to the 10s–100s keV energy seed population, followed by enhancements to the >1 MeV population and eventually leading to enhancements in the multi-MeV electron population. These observations provide the clearest evidence to date . . .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2275 - 2281 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059626 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL059626
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Quantifying the relative contributions of substorm injections and chorus waves to the rapid outward extension of electron radiation belt
Abstract: We study the rapid outward extension of the electron radiation belt on a timescale of several hours during three events observed by RBSP and THEMIS satellites, and particularly quantify the contributions of substorm injections and chorus waves to the electron flux enhancement near the outer boundary of radiation belt. A comprehensive analysis including both observations and simulations is performed for the first event on 26 May 2013. The outer boundary of electron radiation belt moved from L = 5.5 to L > 6.07 over about 6 hours, with up to four orders of magnitude enhancement in the 30 keV-5 MeV electron fluxes at L = 6. The observations show that the substorm injection can cause 100% and 20% of the total subrelativistic (~0.1 MeV) and relativistic (2-5 MeV) electron . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020709 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020709
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Chu X., et al.
Title: Quantitative Evaluation of Radial Diffusion and Local Acceleration Processes During GEM Challenge Events
Abstract: We simulate the radiation belt electron flux enhancements during selected Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) challenge events to quantitatively compare the major processes involved in relativistic electron acceleration under different conditions. Van Allen Probes observed significant electron flux enhancement during both the storm time of 17–18 March 2013 and non–storm time of 19–20 September 2013, but the distributions of plasma waves and energetic electrons for the two events were dramatically different. During 17–18 March 2013, the SYM‐H minimum reached −130 nT, intense chorus waves (peak Bw ~140 pT) occurred at 3.5 < L < 5.5, and several hundred keV to several MeV electron fluxes increased by ~2 orders of magnitude mostly at 3.5 < L < 5.5. During 19–20 September 2013, th. . .
Date: 03/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA025114 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JA025114
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Authors: Yoon Peter H., Hwang Junga, Kim Hyangpyo, and Seough Jungjoon
Title: Quasi Thermal Noise Spectroscopy for Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Quasi thermal fluctuations in the Langmuir/upper‐hybrid frequency range are pervasively observed in space plasmas including the radiation belt and the ring current region of inner magnetosphere as well as the solar wind. The quasi thermal noise spectroscopy may be employed in order to determine the electron density and temperature as well as to diagnose the properties of energetic electrons when direct measurements are not available. However, when employing the technique, one must carefully take the spacecraft orientation into account. The present paper takes the upper‐hybrid and multiple harmonic—or (n + 1/2)fce—emissions measured by the Van Allen Probes as an example in order to illustrate how the spacecraft antenna geometrical factor can be incorporated into the theoretical . . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026460 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026460
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Authors: ěmec F., Hospodarsky G B, ěková B., Demekhov A. G., Pasmanik D. L., et al.
Title: Quasiperiodic Whistler Mode Emissions Observed by the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft
Abstract: Quasiperiodic (QP) emissions are whistler mode electromagnetic waves observed in the inner magnetosphere which exhibit a QP time modulation of the wave intensity. We analyze 768 QP events observed during the first five years of the operation of the Van Allen Probes spacecraft (09/2012–10/2017). Multicomponent wave measurements performed in the equatorial region, where the emissions are likely generated, are used to reveal new experimental information about their properties. We show that the events are observed nearly exclusively inside the plasmasphere. Wave frequencies are mostly between about 0.5 and 4 kHz. The events observed at larger radial distances and on the duskside tend to have slightly lower frequencies than the emissions observed elsewhere. The maximum event frequencies are l. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026058 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026058
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Authors: Dai Guyue, Su Zhenpeng, Liu Nigang, Wang Bin, Zheng Huinan, et al.
Title: Quenching of Equatorial Magnetosonic Waves by Substorm Proton Injections
Abstract: Near equatorial (fast) magnetosonic waves, characterized by high magnetic compressibility, are whistler‐mode emissions destabilized by proton shell/ring distributions. In the past, substorm proton injections are widely known to intensify magnetosonic waves in the inner magnetosphere. Here we report the unexpected observations by the Van Allen Probes of the magnetosonic wave quenching associated with the substorm proton injections under both high‐ and low‐density conditions. The enhanced proton thermal pressure distorted the background magnetic field configuration and the cold plasma density distribution. The reduced phase velocities locally allowed the weak growth or even damping of magnetosonic waves. Meanwhile, the spatially irregularly varying refractive indices might suppress the. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082944 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL082944
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Authors: Gerrard Andrew, Lanzerotti Louis, Gkioulidou Matina, Mitchell Donald, Manweiler Jerry, et al.
Title: Quiet time observations of He ions in the inner magnetosphere as observed from the RBSPICE instrument aboard the Van Allen Probes mission
Abstract: He ions contribute to Earth's ring current energy and species population density and are important in understanding ion transport and charge exchange processes in the inner magnetosphere. He ion flux measurements made by the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument are presented in this paper. Particular focus is centered on geomagnetically quiet intervals in late 2012 and 2013 that show the flux, L-shell, and energy (65 keV to 518 keV) morphology of ring current He ions between geomagnetic storm injection events. The overall He ion abundance during the first nine months of RBSPICE observations, the appearance of a persistent high energy, low L-shell He ion population, and the temporal evolution of this population all provide new insights. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1100 - 1105 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059175 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059175
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Authors: Holmes-Siedle A G, Goldsten J O, Maurer R H, and Peplowski P N
Title: RadFET Dosimeters in the Belt: the Van Allen Probes on Day 365
Abstract: Van Allen Probes A and B, launched more than a year ago (in August 2012), carried 16 p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor Radiation-sensitive Field Effect Transistors (RadFET)s into an orbit designed by NASA to probe the heart of the trapped-radiation belts. Nearly 350 days of in situ measurements from the Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) (1) demonstrated strong variations of dose rates with time, (2) revealed a critical correlation between the ERM RadFET dosimeters and the ERM Faraday cup data on charged particles, and (3) permitted the mapping of the belts by measuring variation with orbit altitude. This paper provides an update on early results given in a NSREC2012 paper along with details and discussion of the RadFET dosimetry data analyzed .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science Pages: 948 - 954 DOI: 10.1109/TNS.2014.2307012 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6786389
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Authors: Holmes-Siedle A.G., Maurer R H, and Peplowski P N
Title: RadFET Dosimeters in the Belt: the Van Allen Probes on Day 365
Abstract: Van Allen Probes A and B, launched more than a year ago (in August 2012), carried 16 p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor Radiation-sensitive Field Effect Transistors (RadFET)s into an orbit designed by NASA to probe the heart of the trapped-radiation belts. Nearly 350 days of in situ measurements from the Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) (1) demonstrated strong variations of dose rates with time, (2) revealed a critical correlation between the ERM RadFET dosimeters and the ERM Faraday cup data on charged particles, and (3) permitted the mapping of the belts by measuring variation with orbit altitude. This paper provides an update on early results given in a NSREC2012 paper along with details and discussion of the RadFET dosimetry data analyzed .
Date: 04/2014 Publisher: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science Pages: 948-954 DOI: N/A Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=6786389
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Authors: Brautigam D H, and Albert J M
Title: Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm
Abstract: The response of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm is analyzed in detail using a radial diffusion model and data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geosynchronous satellite 1989-046. Electron measurements are expressed in terms of phase space density as a function of the three adiabatic invariants determined from CRRES magnetic field data and the Tsyganenko 1989 Kp-dependent magnetic field model. The radial diffusion model is implemented with a time-dependent radial diffusion coefficient parameterized by Kp, and a time-dependent outer boundary condition scaled by geosynchronous electron data. The results show that radial diffusion propagates outer boundary variations. . .
Date: 01/2000 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 291 DOI: 10.1029/1999JA900344 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/1999JA900344/full
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Authors: Fei Yue, Chan Anthony A, Elkington Scot R, and Wiltberger Michael J
Title: Radial diffusion and MHD particle simulations of relativistic electron transport by ULF waves in the September 1998 storm
Abstract: In an MHD particle simulation of the September 1998 magnetic storm the evolution of the radiation belt electron radial flux profile appears to be diffusive, and diffusion caused by ULF waves has been invoked as the probable mechanism. In order to separate adiabatic and nonadiabatic effects and to investigate the radial diffusion mechanism during this storm, in this work we solve a radial diffusion equation with ULF wave diffusion coefficients and a time-dependent outer boundary condition, and the results are compared with the phase space density of the MHD particle simulation. The diffusion coefficients include contributions from both symmetric resonance modes (ω ≈ mωd, where ω is the wave frequency, m is the azimuthal wave number, and ωd is the bounce-averaged drift frequency) and . . .
Date: 12/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2005JA011211 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2005JA011211/abstract
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Authors: Newkirk L L, and Walt M
Title: Radial Diffusion Coefficient for Electrons at 1.76 < L < 5
Abstract: Radial diffusion by nonconservation of the third adiabatic invariant of particle motion is assumed in analyzing experiments in which electrons appeared to move across field lines. Time-dependent solutions of the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation are obtained numerically and fitted to the experimental results by adjusting the diffusion coefficient. Values deduced for the diffusion coefficient vary from 1.3 × 10−5 RE²/day at L = 1.76 to 0.10 RE²/day at L = 5. In the interval 2.6 < L < 5, the coefficient varies as L10±1. Assuming a constant electron source of arbitrary magnitude at L = 6 and the above diffusion coefficients, the equatorial equilibrium distribution is calculated for electrons with energies above 1.6 Mev. The calculation yields an outer belt of electrons whose radial distr. . .
Date: 12/1968 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 7231 - 7236 DOI: 10.1029/JA073i023p07231 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA073i023p07231/abstract
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Authors: Newkirk L L, and Walt M
Title: Radial Diffusion Coefficient for Electrons at Low L Values
Abstract: An empirical evaluation of the diffusion coefficient for trapped electrons diffusing across low L shells is obtained by adjusting the coefficient to account for the observed radial profile and the long-term decay rate of the trapped electron flux. The diffusion mechanism is not identified, but it is assumed that the adiabatic invariants µ and J are conserved. The average value of the coefficient for electrons > 1.6 Mev energy is found to decrease monotonically from ∼4 × 10−6 RE²/day at L = 1.16 to ∼2 × 10−7 RE²/day at L = 1.20.
Date: 02/1968 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 1013 - 1017 DOI: 10.1029/JA073i003p01013 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA073i003p01013/abstract
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, and Chen Yue
Title: Radial diffusion comparing a THEMIS statistical model with geosynchronous measurements as input
Abstract: The outer boundary energetic electron flux is used as a driver in radial diffusion calculations, and its precise determination is critical to the solution. A new model was proposed recently based on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) measurements to express the boundary flux as three fit functions of solar wind parameters in a response window that depend on energy and which solar wind parameter is used: speed, density, or both. The Dartmouth radial diffusion model has been run using Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geosynchronous satellite measurements as the constraint for a one-month interval in July to August 2004, and the calculated phase space density (PSD) is compared with GPS measurements, at magnetic equatorial plane crossings, as a te. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1863 - 1873 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2013JA019320 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019320
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Authors: Lanzerotti L J, Maclennan C G, and Schulz Michael
Title: Radial Diffusion of Outer-Zone Electrons: An Empirical Approach to Third-Invariant Violation
Abstract: The near-equatorial fluxes of outer-zone electrons (E>0.5 Mev and E>1.9 Mev) measured by an instrument on the satellite Explorer 15 following the geomagnetic storm of December 17–18, 1962, are used to determine the electron radial diffusion coefficients and electron lifetimes as functions of L for selected values of the conserved first invariant µ. For each value of µ, the diffusion coefficient is assumed to be time-independent and representable in the form D = DnLn. The diffusion coefficients and lifetimes are then simultaneously obtained by requiring that the L-dependent reciprocal electron lifetime, as determined from the Fokker-Planck equation, deviate minimally from a constant in time. Applied to the data, these few assumptions yield a value of D that is smaller by approximately a. . .
Date: 10/1970 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 5351 - 5371 DOI: 10.1029/JA075i028p05351 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA075i028p05351/abstract
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Authors: Farley Thomas A
Title: Radial Diffusion of Starfish Electrons
Abstract: A study of the change in electron intensities in the Starfish electron belt from January 1, 1963, to November 3, 1965, indicates that radial diffusion, both inward and outward from L of 1.40, was a significant loss mechanism for these electrons during this period. For L values of 1.20 and below, the indicated steepening of the pitch-angle distributions during this period has been interpreted as the result of a radial diffusion source for each L shell concentrated near the geomagnetic equator. Since pitch-angle diffusion lifetimes are not well known for 1.20 < L < 1.65, a definitive radial diffusion coefficient cannot be computed from these data. A maximum reasonable diffusion coefficient (mean square displacement per unit time) computed for this range of L for this period has a minimum at . . .
Date: 07/1969 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 3591 - 3600 DOI: 10.1029/JA074i014p03591 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA074i014p03591/abstract
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Authors: Albert J
Title: Radial diffusion simulations of the 20 September 2007 radiation belt dropout
Abstract: This is a study of a dropout of radiation belt electrons, associated with an isolated solar wind density pulse on 20 September 2007, as seen by the solid-state telescopes (SST) detectors on THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms). Omnidirectional fluxes were converted to phase space density at constant invariants M = 700 MeV G−1 and K = 0.014 RE G1/2, with the assumption of local pitch angle α ≈ 80° and using the T04 magnetic field model. The last closed drift shell, which was calculated throughout the time interval, never came within the simulation outer boundary of L* = 6. It is found, using several different models for diffusion rates, that radial diffusion alone only allows the data-driven, time-dependent boundary values at Lmax = 6 and Lmin =. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 925 - 934 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-32-925-2014 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/32/925/2014/http://www.ann-geophys.net/32/925/2014/angeo-32-925-2014.pdf
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Authors: Liu Z. Y., Zong Q.-G., Hao Y. X., Liu Y., and Chen X. R.
Title: The Radial Propagation Characteristics of the Injection Front: A Statistical Study Based on BD-IES and Van Allen Probes Observations
Abstract: Electron flux measurements outside geosynchronous orbit (GSO) obtained by the BeiDa Imaging Electron Spectrometer instrument onboard a 55 degrees-inclined GSO satellite, and inside GSO obtained by the Van Allen Probes are analyzed to investigate the temporal and spatial evolutions of the substorm injection region. In one year data started from October 2015, 63 injection events are identified. Firstly, our study shows that the injection signatures can be detected in a large radial extent in one single event, for example, from L ∼ 4.1 to L ∼ 9.3. Secondly, injection onset times are derived from the energy dispersion of particle injection signatures of each satellite. The difference of the onset times among satellites reveals that the injection boundary, termed as “injection front” in. . .
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2018JA025185 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2018JA025185/full
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Authors: UKHORSKIY A, and SITNOV M
Title: Radial transport in the outer radiation belt due to global magnetospheric compressions
Abstract: Earth's outer radiation belt is populated by relativistic electrons that produce a complex dynamical response to varying geomagnetic activity. One fundamental process defining global state of the belt is radial transport of electrons across their drift shells. Radial transport is induced by resonant interaction of electron drift motion with ULF oscillations of electric and magnetic fields and is commonly believed to be a diffusive process. The goal of this paper is the analysis of radial transport due to typical ULF fluctuations in the inner magnetospheric fields. For this purpose a test-particle approach is used in the guiding center approximation. In particular we consider ULF oscillations due to global magnetospheric compressions. It is shown that typical pressure variations induce larg. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1714 - 1726 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001971
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Authors: Mitani K., Seki K., Keika K, Gkioulidou M., Lanzerotti L J, et al.
Title: Radial Transport of Higher-Energy Oxygen Ions Into the Deep Inner Magnetosphere Observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The transport mechanism of the ring current ions differs among ion energies. Lower‐energy (≲150 keV) ions are well known to be transported convectively. Higher‐energy (≳150 keV) protons are reported to be transported diffusively, while there are few reports about transport of higher‐energy oxygen ions. We report the radial transport of higher‐energy oxygen ions into the deep inner magnetosphere during the late main phase of the magnetic storm on 23–25 April 2013 observed by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. An enhancement of 1–100 mHz magnetic fluctuations is simultaneously observed. Observations of 3 and 30 mHz geomagnetic pulsations indicate the azimuthal mode number is ≤10. The fluctuations can resonate with the drift and bounce motions of the oxygen ions. The results s. . .
Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077500 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2018GL077500
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Radial transport of radiation belt electrons in kinetic field-line resonances
Abstract: A representative case study from the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm recovery phase reveals enhanced electron fluxes at intermediate pitch angles over energies from ~100 keV to 5 MeV coincident with broadband low frequency electromagnetic waves. The statistical properties of these waves are used to build a model for radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonances in kinetic Alfvén eigenmodes/kinetic field-line resonances. Estimated diffusion coefficients indicate timescales for radial transport of the order of hours in storm-time events at energies from <100 keV to MeVs over equatorial pitch angles from the edge of the loss cone to nearly perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The correlation of kinetic resonances with electron depletions and enhancements during storm main phase. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074587 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074587/full
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Authors: Hudson M K, Brito Thiago, Elkington Scot, Kress Brian, Li Zhao, et al.
Title: Radiation belt 2D and 3D simulations for CIR-driven storms during Carrington Rotation 2068
Abstract: As part of the International Heliospheric Year, the Whole Heliosphere Interval, Carrington Rotation 2068, from March 20 to April 16, 2008 was chosen as an internationally coordinated observing and modeling campaign. A pair of solar wind structures identified as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR), characteristic of the declining phase of the solar cycle and solar minimum, was identified in solar wind plasma measurements from the ACE satellite. Such structures have previously been determined to be geoeffective in producing enhanced outer zone radiation belt electron fluxes, on average greater than at solar maximum. MHD fields from the Coupled Magnetosphere–Ionosphere–Thermosphere (CMIT) model driven by ACE solar wind measurements at L1 have been used to drive both 2D and 3D weighted te. . .
Date: 07/2012 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 51 - 62 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2012.03.017 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612001010
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Reeves G D, Baker D N, et al.
Title: Radiation belt “dropouts” and drift-bounce resonances in broadband electromagnetic waves
Abstract: Observations during the main phase of geomagnetic storms reveal an anti-correlation between the occurrence of broadband low frequency electromagnetic waves and outer radiation belt electron flux. We show that the drift-bounce motion of electrons in the magnetic field of these waves leads to rapid electron transport. For observed spectral energy densities it is demonstrated that the wave magnetic field can drive radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonance on timescales less than a drift orbit. This process may provide outward transport sufficient to account for electron “dropouts” during storm main phase and more generally modulate the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms.
Date: 02/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL076362 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL076362/full
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Ni B, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiati. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4681 - 4693 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.610.1002/2014JA019945 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.6http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019945
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ma Q, Ni B, and Bortnik J
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is suggested to be fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron population to ultra-relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to multi MeV within ∼15 hours. A clear peak in electron phase space density observed at L∗ ∼ 4 indicates that the internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements by multiple POES satellites over a broad L-MLT region, which is used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929882 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929882
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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Zhang X.-J., et al.
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations
Abstract: Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak loca. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5520 - 5536 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v121.610.1002/2016JA022400 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022400
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Authors: Lei Mingda, Xie Lun, Li Jinxing, Pu Zuyin, Fu Suiyan, et al.
Title: The Radiation Belt Electron Scattering by Magnetosonic Wave: Dependence on Key Parameters
Abstract: Magnetosonic (MS) waves have been found capable of creating radiation belt electron butterfly distributions in the inner magnetosphere. To investigate the physical nature of the interactions between radiation belt electrons and MS waves, and to explore a preferential condition for MS waves to scatter electrons efficiently, we performed a comprehensive parametric study of MS wave-electron interactions using test particle simulations. The diffusion coefficients simulated by varying the MS wave frequency show that the scattering effect of MS waves is frequency insensitive at low harmonics (f < 20 fcp), which has great implications on modeling the electron scattering caused by MS waves with harmonic structures. The electron scattering caused by MS waves is very sensitive to wave normal angles,. . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023801 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023801/full
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Authors: McCarthy Michael P., Millan Robyn M., Sample John G., and Smith David M.
Title: Radiation belt losses observed from multiple stratospheric balloons over Antarctica
Abstract: Relativistic electrons, trapped by Earth's magnetic field, have received increasing attention since increasing numbers of commercial and research spacecraft traverse regions of high radiation flux. The Van Allen probes were launched into Earth's radiation belts in September 2012, making comprehensive measurements of charged particle fluxes and electromagnetic fields, with the objective of a better understanding of the processes that modulate radiation belt fluxes. Because losses of radiation belt electrons to Earth's atmosphere are very difficult to measure from high altitude spacecraft, a balloon-based program, consisting of campaigns in January 2013 and 2014, was funded to measure losses in conjunction with the Van Allen probes mission. We present results from both balloon campaigns, whi. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929960 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929960
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Authors: Tang C. L., Wang Y. X., Ni B, Zhang J.-C., Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Radiation belt seed population and its association with the relativistic electron dynamics: A statistical study
Abstract: Using the particle data measured by Van Allen Probe A from October 2012 to March 2016, we investigate in detail the radiation belt seed population and its association with the relativistic electron dynamics during 74 geomagnetic storms. The period of the storm recovery phase was limited to 72 h. The statistical study shows that geomagnetic storms and substorms play important roles in the radiation belt seed population (336 keV electrons) dynamics. Based on the flux changes of 1 MeV electrons before and after the storm peak, these storm events are divided into two groups of “large flux enhancement” and “small flux enhancement.” For large flux enhancement storm events, the correlation coefficients between the peak flux location of the seed population and those of relativistic electro. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA023905 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA023905/full
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, Fretz Kristen, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design
Abstract: NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning spacecraft in an elliptical orbit around earth from 600 km perigee to 30,000 km apogee at 10 degree inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin spacecraft will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other 4 times per year; this offers simultaneous meas. . .
Date: 03/2012 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06187020
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Authors: Mitchell D G, Lanzerotti L J, Kim C K, Stokes M, Ho G, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE)
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft is the magnetosphere ring current instrument that will provide data for answering the three over-arching questions for the Van Allen Probes Program: RBSPICE will determine “how space weather creates the storm-time ring current around Earth, how that ring current supplies and supports the creation of the radiation belt populations,” and how the ring current is involved in radiation belt losses. RBSPICE is a time-of-flight versus total energy instrument that measures ions over the energy range from ∼20 keV to ∼1 MeV. RBSPICE will also measure electrons over the energy range ∼25 keV to ∼1 MeV in order to provide instrument background information in the radiation belts. A des. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 263-308 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9965-x Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9965-x
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Authors: Kessel R L, Fox N J, and Weiss M
Title: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) and Space Weather
Abstract: Following the launch and commissioning of NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) in 2012, space weather data will be generated and broadcast from the spacecraft in near real-time. The RBSP mission targets one part of the space weather chain: the very high energy electrons and ions magnetically trapped within Earth’s radiation belts. The understanding gained by RBSP will enable us to better predict the response of the radiation belts to solar storms in the future, and thereby protect space assets in the near-Earth environment. This chapter details the presently planned RBSP capabilities for generating and broadcasting near real-time space weather data, discusses the data products, the ground stations collecting the data, and the users/models that will incorporate the data into test-b. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 531-543 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9953-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9953-6
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Authors: Turney D, Matiella Novak A, Beisser K, and Fox N
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach Program
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program serves as a pipeline of activities to inspire and educate a broad audience about Heliophysics and the Sun-Earth system, specifically the Van Allen Radiation Belts. The program is comprised of a variety of formal, informal and public outreach activities that all align with the NASA Education Portfolio Strategic Framework outcomes. These include lesson plans and curriculum for use in the classroom, teacher workshops, internship opportunities, activities that target underserved populations, collaboration with science centers and NASA visitors’ centers and partnerships with experts in the Heliophysics and education disciplines. This paper will detail the activities that make up the RBSP E/PO program, their in. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 617-646 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9945-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9945-6
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Authors: Ukhorskiy Aleksandr Y., Mauk Barry H., Fox Nicola J., Sibeck David G., and Grebowsky Joseph M.
Title: Radiation belt storm probes: Resolving fundamental physics with practical consequences
Abstract: The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.
Date: 07/2011 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1417 - 1424 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2010.12.005 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682610003688
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Authors: Reeves Geoffrey D
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes: The Next Generation of Space Weather Forecasting
Abstract: N/A
Date: 11/2007 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2007SW000341 Available at: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2007/2007SW000341.shtml
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Artis David, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes—Observatory and Environments
Abstract: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission that launched August 30, 2012, and is the latest science mission in NASA’s Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, as well as the influence of the Sun on the Earth’s environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning observatories in an elliptical orbit around earth with 600 km perigee, 30,000 km apogee and 10∘ inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin RBSP observatories (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) wil. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 59-125 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9949-2 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9949-2
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Authors: Maurer Richard H., Fretz Kristin, Angert Matthew P., Bort David L., Goldsten John O., et al.
Title: Radiation-Induced Single-Event Effects on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft
Abstract: Electronic devices on the Van Allen Probes mission have experienced more than a thousand single-event effects (SEE) during the 4.5 years of transit through the inner and outer earth trapped radiation belts. The majority of these SEE have been due to trapped protons determined by the orbit timing and the dose rate response of the engineering radiation monitor. Fault tolerant systems engineering and spacecraft operation have enabled a successful mission to date without a safe mode or spacecraft emergency.
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science Pages: 2782 - 2793 DOI: 10.1109/TNS.2017.2754878 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8047305/http://xplorestaging.ieee.org/ielx7/23/8106918/08047305.pdf?arnumber=8047305
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Authors: Jordanova V K, Tu W., Chen Y., Morley S. K., Panaitescu A.-D., et al.
Title: RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm
Abstract: Mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm using our ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT)-dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science observations. The dynamics of the source (approximately tens of keV) and seed (approximately hundreds of keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron . . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022470 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022470/abstract
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Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Merkin V. G., and Artemyev A. V.
Title: Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts
Abstract: [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processe. . .
Date: 01/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4952–4962, DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50452 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.50452
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Authors: Yue Chao, Li Wen, Nishimura Yukitoshi, Zong Qiugang, Ma Qianli, et al.
Title: Rapid enhancement of low-energy (<100 eV) ion flux in response to interplanetary shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms
Abstract: Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2 October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancemen. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022808 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022808
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Authors: Tang C. L., Xie X. J., Ni B, Su Z. P., Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Rapid Enhancements of the Seed Populations in the Heart of the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt: A Multicase Study
Abstract: To better understand rapid enhancements of the seed populations (hundreds of keV electrons) in the heart of the Earth's outer radiation belt (L* ~ 3.5–5.0) during different geomagnetic activities, we investigate three enhancement events measured by Van Allen Probes in detail. Observations of the fluxes and the pitch angle distributions of energetic electrons are analyzed to determine rapid enhancements of the seed populations. Our study shows that three specified processes associated with substorm electron injections can lead to rapid enhancements of the seed populations, and the electron energy increases up to 342 keV. In the first process, substorm electron injections accompanied by the transient and intense substorm electric fields can directly lead to rapid enhancements of the seed p. . .
Date: 06/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA025142 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA025142
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ni B, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Rapid local acceleration of relativistic radiation-belt electrons by magnetospheric chorus
Abstract: Recent analysis of satellite data obtained during the 9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm identified the development of peaks in electron phase space density1, which are compelling evidence for local electron acceleration in the heart of the outer radiation belt2, 3, but are inconsistent with acceleration by inward radial diffusive transport4, 5. However, the precise physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration on 9 October was not identified. Previous modelling has indicated that a magnetospheric electromagnetic emission known as chorus could be a potential candidate for local electron acceleration6, 7, 8, 9, 10, but a definitive resolution of the importance of chorus for radiation-belt acceleration was not possible because of limitations in the energy range and resolution of previous. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Nature Pages: 411 - 414 DOI: 10.1038/nature12889 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature12889
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Gao Zhonglei, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, Wang Shui, et al.
Title: Rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons by EMIC waves
Abstract: How relativistic electrons are lost is an important question surrounding the complex dynamics of the Earth's outer radiation belt. Radial loss to the magnetopause and local loss to the atmosphere are two main competing paradigms. Here, on the basis of the analysis of a radiation belt storm event on 27 February 2014, we present new evidence for the EMIC wave-driven local precipitation loss of relativistic electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt. During the main phase of this storm, the radial profile of relativistic electron phase space density was quasi-monotonic, qualitatively inconsistent with the prediction of radial loss theory. The local loss at low L-shells was required to prevent the development of phase space density peak resulting from the radial loss process at high L-. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024169 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024169/full
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Authors: Kurita S., Miyoshi Y, Shiokawa K., Higashio N., Mitani T., et al.
Title: Rapid loss of relativistic electrons by EMIC waves in the outer radiation belt observed by Arase, Van Allen Probes, and the PWING ground stations
Abstract: There has been increasing evidence for pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Theoretical studies have predicted that the loss time scale of MeV electrons by EMIC waves can be very fast, suggesting that MeV electron fluxes rapidly decrease in association with the EMIC wave activity. This study reports on a unique event of MeV electron loss induced by EMIC waves based on Arase, Van Allen Probes, and ground‐based network observations. Arase observed a signature of MeV electron loss by EMIC waves, and the satellite and ground‐based observations constrained spatial‐temporal variations of the EMIC wave activity during the loss event. Multi‐satellite observation of MeV electron fluxes showed that ~2.5 MeV electron fluxes substantia. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080262 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080262
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Authors: Butler Michael, and Laughery Sean
Title: The RBSP Spacecraft Power System Design and Development
Abstract: The RBSP (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin spacecraft are set to launch in August 2012. The spacecraft will be inserted into the highly elliptical regions of high energy particles trapped by the magnetic field of the earth. These regions are often referred to as the Van Allen Belts. The twin spacecraft will operate entirely within the radiation belts throughout their mission. Because of the intense environment of operation and to reduce cost and risk, the approach taken in the power system electronics was to use quasi conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques encased in a 350mil thick aluminum enclosure. The spacecraft are spin stabilized with an axial boom that creates a shadow across the solar arrays. The power system topology selected was a 28V unregulat. . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MIECEC1210.2514/6.2012-4059 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2012-4059
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Authors: Soto-Chavez A. R., Lanzerotti L J, Gerrard A., Kim H., Bortnik J, et al.
Title: RBSPICE measurement of ion loss during the 2015 March storm: Adiabatic response to the geomagnetic field change
Abstract: A strongly energy-dependent ring current ion loss was measured by the RBSPICE instrument on the Van Allen Probes A spacecraft in the local evening sector during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm. The ion loss is found to be energy dependent where only ions with energies measured above ∼ 150 keV have a significant drop in intensity. At these energies the ion dynamics are principally controlled by variations of the geomagnetic field which, during magnetic storms, exhibits large scale variations on timescales from minutes to hours. Here we show that starting from ∼ 19:10 UTC on March 17 the geomagnetic field increased from 220 to 260 nT on a time scale of about an hour as captured by RBSPICE-A close to spacecraft apogee, L = 6.1 and MLT = 21.85 hr. [GSM coordinates X=-4.89, Y=3.00, . . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022512 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022512/abstract
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Authors: Aseev N.A., and Shprits Y.Y.
Title: Reanalysis of ring current electron phase space densities using Van Allen Probe observations, convection model, and log‐normal Kalman filter
Abstract: Models of ring current electron dynamics unavoidably contain uncertainties in boundary conditions, electric and magnetic fields, electron scattering rates, and plasmapause location. Model errors can accumulate with time and result in significant deviations of model predictions from observations. Data assimilation offers useful tools which can combine physics‐based models and measurements to improve model predictions. In this study, we systematically analyze performance of the Kalman filter applied to a log‐transformed convection model of ring current electrons and Van Allen Probe data. We consider long‐term dynamics of μ = 2.3 MeV/G and K = 0.3 G1/2RE electrons from 1 February 2013 to 16 June 2013. By using synthetic data, we show that the Kalman filter is capable of correcting erro. . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1029/2018SW002110 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018SW002110
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Authors: Aseev N. A., and Shprits Y Y
Title: Reanalysis of Ring Current Electron Phase Space Densities Using Van Allen Probe Observations, Convection Model, and Log‐Normal Kalman Filter
Abstract: Models of ring current electron dynamics unavoidably contain uncertainties in boundary conditions, electric and magnetic fields, electron scattering rates, and plasmapause location. Model errors can accumulate with time and result in significant deviations of model predictions from observations. Data assimilation offers useful tools which can combine physics‐based models and measurements to improve model predictions. In this study, we systematically analyze performance of the Kalman filter applied to a log‐transformed convection model of ring current electrons and Van Allen Probe data. We consider long‐term dynamics of μ = 2.3 MeV/G and K = 0.3 G1/2RE electrons from 1 February 2013 to 16 June 2013. By using synthetic data, we show that the Kalman filter is capable of correcting . . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Space Weather Pages: 619 - 638 DOI: 10.1029/2018SW002110 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018SW002110
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