Biblio

Found 683 results
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Journal Article
Authors: Agapitov O. V., Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Mozer F S, Hospodarsky G., et al.
Title: Synthetic empirical chorus wave model from combined Van Allen Probes and Cluster statistics
Abstract: Chorus waves are among the most important natural electromagnetic emissions in the magnetosphere as regards their potential effects on electron dynamics. They can efficiently accelerate or precipitate electrons trapped in the outer radiation belt, producing either fast increases of relativistic particle fluxes, or auroras at high latitudes. Accurately modeling their effects, however, requires detailed models of their wave power and obliquity distribution as a function of geomagnetic activity in a particularly wide spatial domain, rarely available based solely on the statistics obtained from only one satellite mission. Here, we seize the opportunity of synthesizing data from the Van Allen Probes and Cluster spacecraft to provide a new comprehensive chorus wave model in the outer radiation b. . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024843 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024843/full
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Authors: Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Turner D. L., Nakamura R, Schmid D., et al.
Title: A telescopic and microscopic examination of acceleration in the June 2015 geomagnetic storm: Magnetospheric Multiscale and Van Allen Probes study of substorm particle injection
Abstract: An active storm period in June 2015 showed that particle injection events seen sequentially by the four (Magnetospheric Multiscale) MMS spacecraft subsequently fed the enhancement of the outer radiation belt observed by Van Allen Probes mission sensors. Several episodes of significant southward interplanetary magnetic field along with a period of high solar wind speed (Vsw ≳ 500 km/s) on 22 June occurred following strong interplanetary shock wave impacts on the magnetosphere. Key events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progressed through a sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigured at 19:32 UT. Energetic electrons, plasma, and magnetic fields measured by the four MMS spacecraft revealed clear dipolarization front. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6051 - 6059 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1210.1002/2016GL069643 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069643
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Authors: Goldstein J, Gallagher D., Craven P. D., Comfort R. H., Genestreti K. J., et al.
Title: Temperature Dependence of Plasmaspheric Ion Composition
Abstract: We analyze a database of Dynamics Explorer‐1 (DE‐1) Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer densities and temperatures to yield the first explicit measure of how cold ion concentration depends on temperature. We find that cold H+ and He+ concentrations have very weak dependence on temperature, but cold O+ ion concentration increases steeply as these ions become warmer. We demonstrate how this result can aid in analyzing composition data from other satellites without spacecraft potential mitigation, by applying the result to an example using data from the Van Allen Probes mission. Measurement of light ion concentrations above 1 electron volt (eV) are a reasonable proxy for the concentrations of colder (eV) ions. Warmer O+ ion concentrations may be extrapolated to colder temperatures using our f. . .
Date: 07/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 6585 - 6595 DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026822 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026822
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Authors: Genestreti K. J., Goldstein J, Corley G. D., Farner W., Kistler L. M., et al.
Title: Temperature of the plasmasphere from Van Allen Probes HOPE
Abstract: We introduce two novel techniques for estimating temperatures of very low energy space plasmas using, primarily, in situ data from an electrostatic analyzer mounted on a charged and moving spacecraft. The techniques are used to estimate proton temperatures during intervals where the bulk of the ion plasma is well below the energy bandpass of the analyzer. Both techniques assume that the plasma may be described by a one-dimensional math formula drifting Maxwellian and that the potential field and motion of the spacecraft may be accounted for in the simplest possible manner, i.e., by a linear shift of coordinates. The first technique involves the application of a constrained theoretical fit to a measured distribution function. The second technique involves the comparison of total and partial. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 310 - 323 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v122.110.1002/2016JA023047 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023047/full
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Authors: Genestreti K. J., Goldstein J., Corley G. D., Farner W., Kistler L. M., et al.
Title: Temperature of the plasmasphere from Van Allen Probes HOPE
Abstract: N/A
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023047 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023047
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Authors: Ferradas C. P., Zhang J.-C., Spence H E, Kistler L. M., Larsen B A, et al.
Title: Temporal evolution of ion spectral structures during a geomagnetic storm: Observations and modeling
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probes/Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer, we perform a case study of the temporal evolution of ion spectral structures observed in the energy range of 1-~50 keV throughout the geomagnetic storm of 2 October 2013. The ion spectral features are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and are signatures of fresh transport from the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. We find that the characteristics of the ion structures are determined by the intensity of the convection electric field. Prior to the beginning of the storm, the plasma sheet inner edge exhibits narrow nose spectral structures that vary little in energy across L values. Ion access to the inner magnetosphere during these times is limited to the nose energy bands. As co. . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024702 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024702/full
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Authors: Noh Sung-Jun, Lee Dae-Young, Choi Cheong-Rim, Kim Hyomin, and Skoug Ruth
Title: Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Instability Using Proton Distributions Obtained From Van Allen Probe-A Observations
Abstract: Anisotropic velocity distributions of protons have long been considered as free energy sources for exciting electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the Earth's magnetosphere. Here we rigorously calculated the proton anisotropy parameter using proton data obtained from Van Allen Probe‐A observations. The calculations are performed for times during EMIC wave events (distinguishing the times immediately after and before EMIC wave onsets) and for times exhibiting no EMIC waves. We find that the anisotropy values are often larger immediately after EMIC wave onsets than the times just before EMIC wave onsets and the non‐EMIC wave times. The increase in anisotropy immediately after the EMIC wave onsets is rather small but discernible, such that the average increase is by ~15% relative t. . .
Date: 08/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025385 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025385
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Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, and Artemyev A. V.
Title: Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions
Abstract: Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi me. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021644 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021644http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021644
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Authors: Artemyev A. V., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F, and Krasnoselskikh V.
Title: Thermal electron acceleration by localized bursts of electric field in the radiation belts
Abstract: In this paper we investigate the resonant interaction of thermal ~10−100 eV electrons with a burst of electrostatic field that results in electron acceleration to kilovolt energies. This single burst contains a large parallel electric field of one sign and a much smaller, longer lasting parallel field of the opposite sign. The Van Allen Probe spacecraft often observes clusters of spatially localized bursts in the Earth's outer radiation belts. These structures propagate mostly away from thegeomagnetic equator and share properties of soliton-like nonlinear electron-acoustic waves: a velocity of propagation is about the thermal velocity of cold electrons (~3000−10000 km/s), and a spatial scale of electric field localization alongthe field lines is about the Debye radius of hot electrons . . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061248 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061248
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Authors: Kessel Mona
Title: Things we don't yet understand about solar driving of the radiation belts.
Abstract: This commentary explores how close we are to predicting the behavior of the radiations belts - the primary science objective of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Starting with what we know or think we know about competing sources, enhancement, transport, and loss, I walk through recent papers that have improved our understanding and then focus on flux dropouts as one particular yardstick of success. I mention a new paradigm for electrons and the importance of reliably matching models and observations for different solar inputs. Although the case for prediction remains a work in progress, there are encouraging signs of progress.
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022472 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022472
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Authors: Keika Kunihiro, Seki Kanako, é Masahito, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Lanzerotti Louis J., et al.
Title: Three-Step Buildup of the 17 March 2015 Storm Ring Current: Implication for the Cause of the Unexpected Storm Intensification
Abstract: We examine the spatiotemporal variations of the energy density and the energy spectral evolution of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere during the main phase of the 17 March 2015 storm, using data from the RBSPICE and EMFISIS instruments onboard Van Allen Probes. The storm developed in response to two southward IMF intervals separated by about 3 h. In contrast to two steps seen in the Dst/SYM-H index, the ring current ion population evolved in three steps: the first subphase was apparently caused by the earlier southward IMF, and the subsequent subphases occurred during the later southward IMF period. Ion energy ranges that contribute to the ring current differed between the three subphases. We suggest that the spectral evolution resulted from the penetration of different plasma shee. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024462 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2017JA024462/full
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Authors: Ripoll J. F., Loridan V., Cunningham G. S., Reeves G D, and Shprits Y Y
Title: On the Time Needed to Reach an Equilibrium Structure of the Radiation Belts
Abstract: In this study, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as the radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape,. . .
Date: 06/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA022207 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA022207
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Authors: Agapitov O., Mourenas D., Artemyev A., Hospodarsky G., and Bonnell J.W.
Title: Timescales for electron quasi‐linear diffusion by lower‐band chorus waves: the effects of ω pe / Ω ce dependence on geomagnetic activity
Abstract: Electron scattering by chorus waves is an important mechanism that can lead to fast electron acceleration and loss in the outer radiation belt. Making use of Van Allen Probes measurements, we present the first statistical survey of megaelectron volt electron pitch angle and energy quasi‐linear diffusion rates by chorus waves as a function of L‐shell, local time, and AE index, taking into account the local electron plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio ωpe/Ωce, chorus wave frequency, and resonance wave amplitude. We demonstrate that during disturbed periods, ωpe/Ωce strongly decreases in the night sector, leading to a faster electron loss but also a much faster electron energization in two distinct regions just above the plasmapause and at L ~ 3.5–5.5. Spatiotemporal variations . . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083446 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL083446
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Authors: Yue Chao, Bortnik Jacob, Chen Lunjin, Ma Qianli, Thorne Richard M., et al.
Title: Transitional behavior of different energy protons based on Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Understanding the dynamical behavior of ~1 eV to 50 keV ions and identifying the energies at which the morphologies transit are important in that they involve the relative intensities and distributions of the large-scale electric and magnetic fields, the outflow, and recombination rates. However, there have been only few direct observational investigations of the transition in drift behaviors of different energy ions before the Van Allen Probes era. Here we statistically analyze ~1 eV to 50 keV hydrogen (H+) differential flux distributions near geomagnetic equator by using Van Allen Probes observations to investigate the H+ dynamics under the regulation of large-scale electric and magnetic fields. Our survey clearly indicates three types of H+ behaviors within different energy rang. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071324 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071324
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Authors: Yue Chao, Bortnik Jacob, Chen Lunjin, Ma Qianli, Thorne Richard M, et al.
Title: Transitional behavior of different energy protons based on Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Understanding the dynamical behavior of ~1 eV to 50 keV ions and identifying the energies at which the morphologies transit are important in that they involve the relative intensities and distributions of the large-scale electric and magnetic fields, the outflow and recombination rates. However, there have been only few direct observational investigations of the transition in drift behaviors of different energy ions before the Van Allen Probes era. Here, we statistically analyze ~1 eV to 50 keV Hydrogen (H+) differential flux distributions near geomagnetic equator by using Van Allen Probes observations to investigate the H+ dynamics under the regulation of large-scale electric and magnetic fields. Our survey clearly indicates three types of H+ behaviors within different energy ranges, whic. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071324 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071324/full
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Authors: Artemyev A. V., Mourenas D., Agapitov O. V., and Blum L.
Title: Transverse eV ion heating by random electric field fluctuations in the plasmasphere
Abstract: Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2–3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse. . .
Date: 02/2017 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas DOI: 10.1063/1.4976713 Available at: http://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4976713
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Authors: Ma Q, Li W, Chen L, Thorne R M, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: The trapping of equatorial magnetosonic waves in the Earth's outer plasmasphere
Abstract: We investigate the excitation and propagation of equatorial magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes and describe evidence for a trapping mechanism for magnetosonic waves in the Earth's plasmasphere. Intense equatorial magnetosonic waves were observed inside the plasmasphere in association with a pronounced proton ring distribution, which provides free energy for wave excitation. Instability analysis along the inbound orbit demonstrates that broadband magnetosonic waves can be excited over a localized spatial region near the plasmapause. The waves can subsequently propagate into the inner plasmasphere and remain trapped over a limited radial extent, consistent with the predictions of near-perpendicular propagation. By performing a similar analysis on another observed magnetosoni. . .
Date: 09/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6307 - 6313 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061414 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061414
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Authors: Betz Eric O.
Title: Trapping waves in Earth's plasmasphere
Abstract: Earth's magnetic field traps donut-shaped bands of radiation in a belt around the planet that react to solar eruptions by growing and shrinking. The Van Allen belts consist of two rings filled with particles from the solar wind and cosmic rays. Within the outer ring of the Van Allen belt sits the plasmasphere, which is the innermost part of the planet's magnetic field and home to low-energy charged particles.
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union Pages: 472 - 472 DOI: 10.1002/2014EO490016 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eost.v95.49http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014EO490016
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Authors: Zhu Hui, Liu Xu, and Chen Lunjin
Title: Triggered Plasmaspheric Hiss: Rising Tone Structures
Abstract: In this study, a rare hiss event observed by Van Allen Probe is reported and the possible generation is investigated based on wave and plasma measurements. The results suggest that the normal hiss (from 0.05fce to 0.5fce) with dominantly equatorward Poynting fluxes is locally generated by plasma sheet electrons via cyclotron instability. The low‐frequency band (from 30 Hz to 0.05fce) with a mixture of equatorward and poleward Poynting fluxes is probably due to multiple reflections inside the plasmasphere. Such difference in the two bands is confirmed by the calculation of minimum energy of resonant electrons and local growth rate. Moreover, the analysis on the fine structures of normal hiss waves shows that besides the expected incoherent structure (below 1 kHz), several rising tone elem. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082688 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL082688
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Authors: Zhang J.-C., Kistler L. M., Spence H E, Wolf R. A., Reeves G., et al.
Title: “Trunk-like” heavy ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Dynamic ion spectral features in the inner magnetosphere are the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. We report “trunk-like” ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes on 2 November 2012. This new type of ion structure looks like an elephant's trunk on an energy-time spectrogram, with the energy of the peak flux decreasing Earthward. The trunks are present in He+ and O+ ions but not in H+. During the event, ion energies in the He+ trunk, located at L = 3.6–2.6, MLT = 9.1–10.5, and MLAT = −2.4–0.09°, vary monotonically from 3.5 to 0.04 keV. The values at the two end points of the O+ trunk are: energy = 4.5–0.7 keV, L = 3.6–2.5, MLT = 9.1–10.7, and MLAT = −2.4–0.4°. Results from backward ion drift path tra. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021822 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021822http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021822
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Authors: Teng S., Tao X., and Li W
Title: Typical Characteristics of Whistler Mode Waves Categorized by Their Spectral Properties Using Van Allen Probes Observations
Abstract: Properties of banded, no‐gap, lower band only, and upper band only whistler mode waves (0.1–0.8fce) outside the plasmasphere are investigated using Van Allen Probes data. Our analysis shows that no‐gap whistler waves have higher occurrence rate at morning side and dayside, while banded and lower band only waves have higher occurrence rate between midnight and dawn. We also find that the occurrence rate of no‐gap whistler waves peaks at magnetic latitude |MLAT|∼8–10°, while banded waves have higher occurrence rate near the equator for urn:x-wiley:grl:media:grl58818:grl58818-math-0001°. The wave normal angle distributions of these four groups of waves are similar to previous results. The distinct local time and latitudinal distribution of no‐gap and banded whistler mode waves. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3607 - 3614 DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082161 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL082161
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Typical values of the electric drift E  ×  B / B 2 in the inner radiation belt and slot region as determined from Van Allen Probe measurements
Abstract: The electric drift E × B/B2 plays a fundamental role for the description of plasma flow and particle acceleration. Yet it is not well-known in the inner belt and slot region because of a lack of reliable in situ measurements. In this article, we present an analysis of the electric drifts measured below L ~ 3 by both Van Allen Probes A and B from September 2012 to December 2014. The objective is to determine the typical components of the equatorial electric drift in both radial and azimuthal directions. The dependences of the components on radial distance, magnetic local time, and geographic longitude are examined. The results from Van Allen Probe A agree with Van Allen Probe B. They show, among other things, a typical corotation lag of the order of 5 to 10% below L ~ 2.6, as w. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023613 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023613/full
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Patel Maulik, Wiltberger Michael, Boyd Alex, et al.
Title: ULF Wave Analysis and Radial Diffusion Calculation Using a Global MHD Model for the 17 March 2013 and 2015 Storms
Abstract: The 17 March 2015 St. Patrick's Day Storm is the largest geomagnetic storm to date of Solar Cycle 24, with a Dst of -223 nT. The magnetopause moved inside geosynchronous orbit under high solar wind dynamic pressure and strong southward IMF Bz causing loss, however a subsequent drop in pressure allowed for rapid rebuilding of the radiation belts. The 17 March 2013 storm also shows similar effects on outer zone electrons: first a rapid dropout due to inward motion of the magnetopause followed by rapid increase in flux above the pre-storm level early in the recovery phase and a slow increase over the next 12 days. These phases can be seen in temporal evolution of the electron phase space density measured by the ECT instruments on Van Allen Probes. Using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD m. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023846 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023846/full
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., et al.
Title: Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons
Abstract: Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fl. . .
Date: 12/2015 Publisher: Nature Communications Pages: 10096 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10096 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms10096
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Bortnik Jacob, Thorne Richard M, Li Wen, Ma Qianli, et al.
Title: Ultrarelativistic electron butterfly distributions created by parallel acceleration due to magnetosonic waves
Abstract: The Van Allen Probe observations during the recovery phase of a large storm that occurred on 17 March 2015 showed that the ultrarelativistic electrons at the inner boundary of the outer radiation belt (L* = 2.6–3.7) exhibited butterfly pitch angle distributions, while the inner belt and the slot region also showed evidence of sub-MeV electron butterfly distributions. Strong magnetosonic waves were observed in the same regions and at the same time periods as these butterfly distributions. Moreover, when these magnetosonic waves extended to higher altitudes (L* = 4.1), the butterfly distributions also extended to the same region. Combining test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck diffusion simulations, we successfully reproduced the formation of the ultrarelativistic electron b. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 3212 - 3222 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022370 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022370
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Authors: Ozeke Louis G., Mann Ian R., Murphy Kyle R., Sibeck David G., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Ultra-relativistic radiation belt extinction and ULF wave radial diffusion: Modeling the September 2014 extended dropout event
Abstract: In September 2014 an unusually long-lasting (≳10 days) ultra-relativistic electron flux depletion occurred in the outer radiation belt despite ongoing solar wind forcing. We simulate this period using a ULF wave radial diffusion model, driven by observed ULF wave power coupled to flux variations at the outer boundary at L* = 5, including empirical electron loss models due to chorus and hiss wave scattering. Our results show that unexplained rapid main phase loss, that depletes the belt within hours, is essential to explain the observations. Such ultra-relativistic electron extinction decouples the prestorm and poststorm fluxes, revealing the subsequent belt dynamics to be surprisingly independent of prestorm flux. However, once this extinction is included, ULF wave transport and co. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072811 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL072811
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Authors: Millan R.M.
Title: Understanding relativistic electron losses with BARREL
Abstract: The primary scientific objective of the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) is to understand the processes responsible for scattering relativistic electrons into Earth's atmosphere. BARREL is the first Living with a Star Geospace Mission of Opportunity, and will consist of two Antarctic balloon campaigns conducted in the 2012 and 2013 Austral summer seasons. During each campaign, a total of 20 small View the MathML source(∼20kg) balloon payloads will be launched, providing multi-point measurements of electron precipitation in conjunction with in situ measurements from the two RBSP spacecraft, scheduled to launch in May 2012. In this paper we outline the scientific objectives of BARREL, highlighting a few key science questions that will be addressed by BARREL in c. . .
Date: 07/2011 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1425 - 1434 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.006 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682611000071
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Authors: Capannolo L., Li W, Ma Q, Zhang X.-J., Redmon R. J., et al.
Title: Understanding the Driver of Energetic Electron Precipitation Using Coordinated Multisatellite Measurements
Abstract: Magnetospheric plasma waves play a significant role in ring current and radiation belt dynamics, leading to pitch angle scattering loss and/or stochastic acceleration of the particles. During a non‐storm time dropout event on 24 September 2013, intense electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves were detected by Van Allen Probe A (Radiation Belt Storm Probes‐A). We quantitatively analyze a conjunction event when Van Allen Probe A was located approximately along the same magnetic field line as MetOp‐01, which detected simultaneous precipitation of >30 keV protons and energetic electrons over an unexpectedly broad energy range (>~30 keV). Multipoint observations together with quasi‐linear theory provide direct evidence that the observed electron precipitation at higher energy (>~700 k. . .
Date: 07/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078604 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL078604
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Authors: Xiang Zheng, Tu Weichao, Li Xinlin, Ni Binbin, Morley S. K., et al.
Title: Understanding the Mechanisms of Radiation Belt Dropouts Observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: To achieve a better understanding of the dominant loss mechanisms for the rapid dropouts of radiation belt electrons, three distinct radiation belt dropout events observed by Van Allen Probes are comprehensively investigated. For each event, observations of the pitch angle distribution of electron fluxes and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are analyzed to determine the effects of atmospheric precipitation loss due to pitch angle scattering induced by EMIC waves. Last closed drift shells (LCDS) and magnetopause standoff position are obtained to evaluate the effects of magnetopause shadowing loss. Evolution of electron phase space density (PSD) versus L* profiles and the μ and K (first and second adiabatic invariants) dependence of the electron PSD drops are calculated to further. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024487 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024487/full
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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Authors: Li W, Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Bortnik J, Thorne R M, et al.
Title: Unraveling the excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus waves
Abstract: Excitation mechanisms of highly oblique, quasi-electrostatic lower band chorus waves are investigated using Van Allen Probes observations near the equator of the Earth's magnetosphere. Linear growth rates are evaluated based on in situ, measured electron velocity distributions and plasma conditions and compared with simultaneously observed wave frequency spectra and wave normal angles. Accordingly, two distinct excitation mechanisms of highly oblique lower band chorus have been clearly identified for the first time. The first mechanism relies on cyclotron resonance with electrons possessing both a realistic temperature anisotropy at keV energies and a plateau at 100–500 eV in the parallel velocity distribution. The second mechanism corresponds to Landau resonance with a 100–500 eV . . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 8867 - 8875 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1710.1002/2016GL070386 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL070386/abstract
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Authors: Li W, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Reeves G D, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: An unusual enhancement of low-frequency plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere associated with substorm-injected electrons
Abstract: Both plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves were observed simultaneously by the two Van Allen Probes in association with substorm-injected energetic electrons. Probe A, located inside the plasmasphere in the postdawn sector, observed intense plasmaspheric hiss, whereas Probe B observed chorus waves outside the plasmasphere just before dawn. Dispersed injections of energetic electrons were observed in the dayside outer plasmasphere associated with significant intensification of plasmaspheric hiss at frequencies down to ~20 Hz, much lower than typical hiss wave frequencies of 100–2000 Hz. In the outer plasmasphere, the upper energy of injected electrons agrees well with the minimum cyclotron resonant energy calculated for the lower cutoff frequency of the observed hiss, and computed conve. . .
Date: 08/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 3798 - 3803 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50787 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/grl.50787
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Authors: Yang Xiaochao, Ni Binbin, Yu Jiang, Zhang Yang, Zhang Xiaoxin, et al.
Title: Unusual refilling of the slot region between the Van Allen radiation belts from November 2004 to January 2005
Abstract: Using multisatellite measurements, a uniquely strong and long-lived relativistic electron slot region refilling event from November 2004 to January 2005 is investigated. This event occurred under remarkable interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions. Both empirically modeled and observationally estimated plasmapause locations demonstrate that the plasmasphere eroded significantly prior to the enhancement phase of this event. The estimated diffusion coefficients indicate that the radial diffusion due to ULF waves is insufficient to account for the observed enhancement of slot region electrons. However, the diffusion coefficients evaluated using the distribution of chorus wave intensities derived from low-altitude POES electron observations indicate that the local acceleration induced by c. . .
Date: 06/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023204 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023204/full
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Authors: Shprits Yuri Y, Subbotin Dmitriy, Drozdov Alexander, Usanova Maria E., Kellerman Adam, et al.
Title: Unusual stable trapping of the ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Radiation in space was the first discovery of the space age. Earth’s radiation belts consist of energetic particles that are trapped by the geomagnetic field and encircle the planet1. The electron radiation belts usually form a two-zone structure with a stable inner zone and a highly variable outer zone, which forms and disappears owing to wave–particle interactions on the timescale of a day, and is strongly influenced by the very-low-frequency plasma waves. Recent observations revealed a third radiation zone at ultrarelativistic energies2, with the additional medium narrow belt (long-lived ring) persisting for approximately 4 weeks. This new ring resulted from a combination of electron losses to the interplanetary medium and scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves to the Ear. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Nature Physics Pages: 699 - 703 DOI: 10.1038/nphys2760 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys2760
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Authors: Li X, Selesnick R. S., Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron Intensity
Abstract: No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (10s of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable, thus for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because of their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020777 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020777
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Authors: O'Brien T.P., Claudepierre S.G., Looper M.D., Blake J.B., Fennell J.F., et al.
Title: On the use of drift echoes to characterize on-orbit sensor discrepancies
Abstract: We describe a method for using drift echo signatures in on-orbit data to resolve discrepancies between different measurements of particle flux. The drift period has a well-defined energy dependence, which gives rise to time dispersion of the echoes. The dispersion can then be used to determine the effective energy for one or more channels given each channel's drift period and the known energy for a reference channel. We demonstrate this technique on multiple instruments from the Van Allen probes mission. Drift echoes are only easily observed at high energies (100s keV to multiple MeV), where several drift periods occur before the observing satellite has moved on or the global magnetic conditions have changed. We describe a first-order correction for spacecraft motion. The drift echo techni. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020859 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020859
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Authors: Hartley D. P., Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, Bounds S R, Averkamp T. F., et al.
Title: Using the cold plasma dispersion relation and whistler-mode waves to quantify the antenna sheath impedance of the Van Allen Probes EFW instrument
Abstract: Cold plasma theory and parallel wave propagation are often assumed when approximating the whistler mode magnetic field wave power from electric field observations. The current study is the first to include the wave normal angle from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science package on board the Van Allen Probes in the conversion factor, thus allowing for the accuracy of these assumptions to be quantified. Results indicate that removing the assumption of parallel propagation does not significantly affect calculated plasmaspheric hiss wave powers. Hence, the assumption of parallel propagation is valid. For chorus waves, inclusion of the wave normal angle in the conversion factor leads to significant alterations in the distribution of wave power ratios (observed/. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022501 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022501
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Mozer F S
Title: Van Allen Probe measurements of the electric drift E × B/B2 at Arecibo's L = 1.4 field line coordinate
Abstract: We have used electric and magnetic measurements by Van Allen Probe B from 2013 to 2014 to examine the equatorial electric drift E × B/B2 at one field line coordinate set to Arecibo's incoherent scatter radar location (L = 1.43). We report on departures from the traditional picture of corotational motion with the Earth in two ways: (1) the rotational angular speed is found to be 10% smaller than the rotational angular speed of the Earth, in agreement with previous works on plasmaspheric notches, and (2) the equatorial electric drift displays a dependence in magnetic local time, with a pattern consistent with the mapping of the Arecibo ionosphere dynamo electric fields along equipotential magnetic field lines. The electric fields due to the ionosphere dynamo are therefore expected t. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6768 - 6774 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069875 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069875
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Authors: Korotova G. I., Sibeck D G, Tahakashi K., Dai L., Spence H E, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probe observations of drift-bounce resonances with Pc 4 pulsations and wave–particle interactions in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We present Van Allen Probe B observations of azimuthally limited, antisymmetric, poloidal Pc 4 electric and magnetic field pulsations in the pre-midnight sector of the magnetosphere from 05:40 to 06:00 UT on 1 May 2013. Oscillation periods were similar for the magnetic and electric fields and proton fluxes. The flux of energetic protons exhibited an energy-dependent response to the pulsations. Energetic proton variations were anticorrelated at medium and low energies. Although we attribute the pulsations to a drift-bounce resonance, we demonstrate that the energy-dependent response of the ion fluxes results from pulsation-associated velocities sweeping energy-dependent radial ion flux gradients back and forth past the spacecraft.
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 955 - 964 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-33-955-2015 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/33/955/2015/angeo-33-955-2015.pdf
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Authors: Boardsen S. A., Hospodarsky G B, Kletzing C A, Pfaff R. F., Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probe Observations of Periodic Rising Frequencies of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode
Abstract: Near simultaneous periodic dispersive features of fast magnetosonic mode emissions are observed by both Van Allen Probes spacecraft while separated in magnetic local time by ~5 hours: Probe A at 15 and Probe B at 9–11 hours. Both spacecraft see similar frequency features, characterized by a periodic repetition at ~180 s. Each repetition is characterized by a rising frequency. Since no modulation is observed in the proton shell distribution, the plasma density, or in the background magnetic field at either spacecraft we conclude that these waves are not generated near the spacecraft but external to both spacecraft locations. Probe A while outside the plasmapause sees the start of each repetition ~40 s before probe B while deep inside the plasmasphere. We can qualitatively reproduce . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062020 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062020
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Authors: Thaller S. A., Wygant J R, Dai L., Breneman A.W., Kersten K., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes investigation of the large scale duskward electric field and its role in ring current formation and plasmasphere erosion in the June 1, 2013 storm
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probes we investigate the enhancement in the large scale duskward convection electric field during the geomagnetic storm (Dst ~ −120 nT) on June 1, 2013 and its role in ring current ion transport and energization, and plasmasphere erosion. During this storm, enhancements of ~1-2 mV/m in the duskward electric field in the co-rotating frame are observed down to L shells as low as ~2.3. A simple model consisting of a dipole magnetic field and constant, azimuthally westward, electric field is used to calculate the earthward and westward drift of 90° pitch angle ions. This model is applied to determine how far earthward ions can drift while remaining on Earth's night side, given the strength and duration of the convection electric field. The calculation based on this simp. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020875 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020875
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Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Wygant J R, Kletzing C A, Lessard M. R., et al.
Title: Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 hours in MLT
Abstract: Although most studies of the effects of EMIC waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on February 23, 2014 that extended over 8 hours in UT and over 12 hours in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. W. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021227 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021227
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Authors: He Yihua, Xiao Fuliang, Zhou Qinghua, Yang Chang, Liu Si, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities
Abstract: We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst≈-45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst≈-18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 − 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1 − 0.5fce and a peak spectral density ∼[10−4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (∼ 10-300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation around bet. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021376 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021376
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Authors: Chen X.-R., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Blake Bernard, Wygant John R., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observation of a 360° phase shift in the flux modulation of injected electrons by ULF waves
Abstract: We present Van Allen Probe observation of drift-resonance interaction between energetic electrons and ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves on October 29, 2013. Oscillations in electron flux were observed at the period of ∼450s, which is also the dominant period of the observed ULF magnetic pulsations. The phase shift of the electron fluxes (∼50 to 150 keV) across the estimated resonant energy (∼104 keV) is ∼360°. This phase relationship is different from the characteristic 180° phase shift as expected from the drift-resonance theory. We speculate that the additional 180° phase difference arises from the inversion of electron phase space density (PSD) gradient, which in turn is caused by the drift motion of the substorm injected electrons. This PSD gradient adjusts the characteristic . . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071252 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071252/full
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Authors: Chen X.-R., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X.-Z., Blake Bernard, Wygant J. R., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observation of a 360° phase shift in the flux modulation of injected electrons by ULF waves
Abstract: We present Van Allen Probe observation of drift-resonance interaction between energetic electrons and ultralow frequency (ULF) waves on 29 October 2013. Oscillations in electron flux were observed at the period of ∼450 s, which is also the dominant period of the observed ULF magnetic pulsations. The phase shift of the electron fluxes (∼50 to 150 keV) across the estimated resonant energy (∼104 keV) is ∼360°. This phase relationship is different from the characteristic 180° phase shift as expected from the drift-resonance theory. We speculate that the additional 180° phase difference arises from the inversion of electron phase space density (PSD) gradient, which in turn is caused by the drift motion of the substorm injected electrons. This PSD gradient adjusts the characteristic p. . .
Date: 02/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071252 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071252/full
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Authors: Takahashi Kazue, Claudepierre S G, Rankin Robert, Mann Ian, and Smith C W
Title: Van Allen Probes Observation of a Fundamental Poloidal Standing Alfvén Wave Event Related to Giant Pulsations
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes‐A spacecraft observed an ∼9 mHz ultra‐low‐frequency wave on 6 October 2012, at L∼ 5.7, in the dawn sector, and very near the magnetic equator. The wave had a strong electric field that was initially stronger in the azimuthal component and later in the radial component, exhibited properties of a fundamental standing Alfvén wave, and was associated with giant pulsations observed on the ground near the magnetic field footprint of the spacecraft. The wave was accompanied by oscillations of the flux of energetic protons (jH+). The amplitude of urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra54254:jgra54254-math-0001 oscillations was large at equatorial pitch angles away from 90°, and the energy dependence of the phase and amplitude of the oscillations exhibited features consistent w. . .
Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA025139 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2017JA025139
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Authors: Claudepierre S G, Mann I R, Takahashi K, Fennell J F, Hudson M K, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observation of localized drift-resonance between poloidal mode ultra-low frequency waves and 60 keV electrons
Abstract: [1] We present NASA Van Allen Probes observations of wave-particle interactions between magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves and energetic electrons (20–500 keV) on 31 October 2012. The ULF waves are identified as the fundamental poloidal mode oscillation and are excited following an interplanetary shock impact on the magnetosphere. Large amplitude modulations in energetic electron flux are observed at the same period (≈ 3 min) as the ULF waves and are consistent with a drift-resonant interaction. The azimuthal mode number of the interacting wave is estimated from the electron measurements to be ~40, based on an assumed symmetric drift resonance. The drift-resonant interaction is observed to be localized and occur over 5–6 wave cycles, demonstrating peak electron flux modul. . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4491–4497 DOI: 10.1002/grl.50901 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50901/full
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Authors: Hartley D. P., Kletzing C A, Chen L, Horne R B, and ík O.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of chorus wave vector orientations: Implications for the chorus-to-hiss mechanism
Abstract: Using observations from the Van Allen Probes EMFISIS instrument, coupled with ray tracing simulations, we determine the fraction of chorus wave power with the conditions required to access the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. It is found that only an extremely small fraction of chorus occurs with the required wave vector orientation, carrying only a small fraction of the total chorus wave power. The exception is on the edge of plasmaspheric plumes, where strong azimuthal density gradients are present. In these cases, up to 94% of chorus wave power exists with the conditions required to access the plasmasphere. As such, we conclude that strong azimuthal density gradients are actually a requirement if a significant fraction of chorus wave power is to enter the plasmasphere an. . .
Date: 02/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082111 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL082111
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Authors: Colpitts C. A., Cattell C. A., Engebretson M., Broughton M., Tian S., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of cross-scale coupling between electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and higher-frequency wave modes
Abstract: We present observations of higher-frequency (~50–2500 Hz, ~0.1–0.7 fce) wave modes modulated at the frequency of colocated lower frequency (0.5–2 Hz, on the order of fci) waves. These observations come from the Van Allen Probes Electric Field and Waves instrument's burst mode data and represent the first observations of coupling between waves in these frequency ranges. The higher-frequency wave modes, typically whistler mode hiss and chorus or magnetosonic waves, last for a few to a few tens of seconds but are in some cases observed repeatedly over several hours. The higher-frequency waves are observed to be unmodulated before and after the presence of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, but when the EMIC waves are present, the amplitude of the higher-frequency waves . . .
Date: 11/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071566 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071566/full
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Authors: Fennell J. F., Roeder J. L., Kurth W S, Henderson M G, Larsen B A, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of direct wave-particle interactions
Abstract: Quasiperiodic increases, or “bursts,” of 17–26 keV electron fluxes in conjunction with chorus wave bursts were observed following a plasma injection on 13 January 2013. The pitch angle distributions changed during the burst events, evolving from sinN(α) to distributions that formed maxima at α = 75–80°, while fluxes at 90° and <60° remained nearly unchanged. The observations occurred outside of the plasmasphere in the postmidnight region and were observed by both Van Allen Probes. Density, cyclotron frequency, and pitch angle of the peak flux were used to estimate resonant electron energy. The result of ~15–35 keV is consistent with the energies of the electrons showing the flux enhancements and corresponds to electrons in and above the steep flux gradient that signa. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1869 - 1875 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059165 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059165
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