Biblio

Found 879 results
Conference Paper
Authors: Butler Michael, and Laughery Sean
Title: The RBSP Spacecraft Power System Design and Development
Abstract: The RBSP (Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin spacecraft are set to launch in August 2012. The spacecraft will be inserted into the highly elliptical regions of high energy particles trapped by the magnetic field of the earth. These regions are often referred to as the Van Allen Belts. The twin spacecraft will operate entirely within the radiation belts throughout their mission. Because of the intense environment of operation and to reduce cost and risk, the approach taken in the power system electronics was to use quasi conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques encased in a 350mil thick aluminum enclosure. The spacecraft are spin stabilized with an axial boom that creates a shadow across the solar arrays. The power system topology selected was a 28V unregulat. . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MIECEC1210.2514/6.2012-4059 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2012-4059
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, Fretz Kristen, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design
Abstract: NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning spacecraft in an elliptical orbit around earth from 600 km perigee to 30,000 km apogee at 10 degree inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin spacecraft will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other 4 times per year; this offers simultaneous meas. . .
Date: 03/2012 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06187020
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Authors: McCarthy Michael P., Millan Robyn M., Sample John G., and Smith David M.
Title: Radiation belt losses observed from multiple stratospheric balloons over Antarctica
Abstract: Relativistic electrons, trapped by Earth's magnetic field, have received increasing attention since increasing numbers of commercial and research spacecraft traverse regions of high radiation flux. The Van Allen probes were launched into Earth's radiation belts in September 2012, making comprehensive measurements of charged particle fluxes and electromagnetic fields, with the objective of a better understanding of the processes that modulate radiation belt fluxes. Because losses of radiation belt electrons to Earth's atmosphere are very difficult to measure from high altitude spacecraft, a balloon-based program, consisting of campaigns in January 2013 and 2014, was funded to measure losses in conjunction with the Van Allen probes mission. We present results from both balloon campaigns, whi. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929960 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929960
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ma Q, Ni B, and Bortnik J
Title: Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is suggested to be fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron population to ultra-relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to multi MeV within ∼15 hours. A clear peak in electron phase space density observed at L∗ ∼ 4 indicates that the internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements by multiple POES satellites over a broad L-MLT region, which is used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929882 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929882
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Authors: Foster John C, and Erickson Philip J.
Title: Prompt energization of relativistic and highly relativistic electrons during a substorm interval
Abstract: On 17 March 2013, a large magnetic storm significantly depleted the multi-MeV radiation belt. We present multi-instrument observations from the Van Allen Probes spacecraft Radiation Belt Storm Probe A and Radiation Belt Storm Probe B at ∼6 Re in the midnight sector magnetosphere and from ground-based ionospheric sensors during a substorm dipolarization followed by rapid reenergization of multi-MeV electrons [1]. A 50% increase in magnetic field magnitude occurred simultaneously with dramatic increases in 100 keV electron fluxes and a 100 times increase in VLF wave intensity. Chorus is excited following the injection of low-energy (1–30 keV) plasma sheet electrons into the inner magnetosphere [2]. During the 17 March substorm injection, cold plasma that had circulated into the nightside. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929876 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929876
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Authors: Kletzing Craig A.
Title: Progress on understanding chorus emissions from data of the electric and magnetic field instrument suite and integrated science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A key wave-particle interaction important to both acceleration and loss in the radiation belts is the of whistler-mode chorus interacting with energetic electrons. To measure this important radiation belt interaction, the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission utilizes one of the most complete sets of measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnet. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929872 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929872
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Authors: Powers Nicole
Title: A Parametric Approach to NASA Mission Operations Costing
Abstract: Quantifying the cost of mission operations can be problematic. Currently few tools exist to estimate these costs and fewer that utilize a parametric approach. This paper begins the process of developing a parametric model for estimating mission operation costs. We hypothesize that the costs of mission operations are determined by the duration and type of operation activity. For the purposes of this paper operation activities fall into the following four categories: hibernated cruise, standard cruise, flyby, and high intensity operations. Hypothesis tests were conducted on each of the aforementioned categories and the results are based on data from APL’s historical missions. Those results will be used to develop a Cost Estimating Relationship (CER) to better predict missio. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/MSPACE1410.2514/6.2014-4398 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2014-4398
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Authors: Adams Norman, Copeland David, Mick Alan, and Pinkine Nickalaus
Title: Optimization of deep-space Ka-band link schedules
Abstract: Downlink scheduling methods that minimize either contact time or data latency are described. For deep-space missions these two methods yield very different schedules. Optimal scheduling algorithms are straightforward for ideal mission scenarios. In practice, additional schedule requirements preclude a tractable optimal algorithm. In lieu of an optimal solution, an iterative sub-optimal algorithm is described. These methods are motivated in part by a need to balance mission risk, which increases with data latency, and mission cost, which increases with contact time. Cost is reduced by delaying downlink contacts until higher data rates are available. Previous work described optimization of individual Ka-band contacts in the presence of time-varying and statistical link parameters. The presen. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836351 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836351
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Authors: Palo Scott E., Gerhardt David, Li Xinlin, Blum Lauren, Schiller Quintin, et al.
Title: One year of on-orbit performance of the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE)
Abstract: The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment is a 3-unit (10cm × 10cm × 30cm) CubeSat funded by the National Science Foundation and constructed at the University of Colorado (CU). The CSSWE science instrument, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), provides directional differential flux measurements of 0.5 to >3.3 MeV electrons and 9 to 40 MeV protons. Though a collaboration of 60+ multidisciplinary graduate and undergraduate students working with CU professors and engineers at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), CSSWE was designed, built, tested, and delivered in 3 years. On September 13, 2012, CSSWE was inserted to a 477 × 780 km, 65° orbit as a secondary payload on an Atlas V through the NASA Educational Launch of. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/USNC-URSI-NRSM.2014.6928087 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6928087
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Authors: Smith Evan J., Butler Michael H., Fretz Kristin, and Wilhelm Benjamin
Title: Lithium Ion Battery Fault Management on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes or RBSP) mission launched on 30 August 2012 as part of NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) Program. The ultimate goal of the mission is to understand how populations of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts are affected by the Sun. The mission consists of two nearly identical observatories orbiting in highly-elliptical Earth orbits. The two satellite system allows for the study of the spatial and temporal effects the Sun has on the Earth’s radiation belts. Each observatory is equipped with a suite of instruments designed to continuously study ions, electrons and the local magnetic and electric fields. A brief overview of the Van Allen Probe mission is pre. . .
Date: 09/2013 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/6.2013-5526 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2013-5526
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Authors: Skov Mulligan, Fennell J.F., Roeder J.L., Blake J.B., and Claudepierre S.G.
Title: Internal Charging Hazards in Near-Earth Space during Solar Cycle 24 Maximum: Van Allen Probes Measurements
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes mission provides an unprecedented opportunity to make detailed measurements of electrons and protons in the inner magnetosphere during the weak solar maximum period of cycle 24. Data from the MagEIS suite of sensors measures energy spectra, fluxes, and yields electron deposition rates that can cause internal charging. We use omni-directional fluxes of electrons and protons to calculate the dose under varying materials and thicknesses of shielding (similar to Fennell et al., 2010). We show examples of charge deposition rates during times of nominal and high levels of penetrating fluxes in the inner magnetosphere covering the period from late 2012 through 2013. These charge deposition rates are related to charging levels quite possibly encountered. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: JPL DOI: 10.1109/TPS.2015.2468214 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7247811/?reload=true&arnumber=7247811
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Authors: Foster John C, and Erickson Philip J.
Title: Initial observations of plasma waves in the sub-auroral polarization stream with the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) is a geospace boundary layer phenomenon associated with the interaction of the warm plasma of the magnetospheric ring current with the cold ions and electrons of the outer plasmasphere [1]. Driven by ring current enhancements during magnetospheric disturbances, SAPS location, intensity, and characteristics are greatly influenced by the underlying ionosphere. Strong M-I coupling by means of field-aligned currents creates a high-speed (>1000 m/s) westward plasma flow channel in the ionosphere at pre-midnight/post-noon local times which is readily observable by incoherent scatter [2] and HF radars and in plasma drift observations by low-altitude spacecraft (e.g. DMSP). The fast ionospheric flows generate E-region irregularities providing for addition. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929852 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929852
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Authors: Foster J C
Title: Imaging the plasmasphere with ground based GPS TEC observations and comparisons with in situ plasmaspheric observations with Van Allen Probes
Abstract: For over a decade, incoherent scatter radar observations of the mid and auroral-latitude ionosphere combined with ground based GPS observations of total electron content (TEC) have been used to study the intense storm enhanced density (SED) plumes that form over the Americas during major geomagnetic storms [1]. Magnetic field mapping of the ionospheric observations to magnetospheric heights revealed close correspondence between the SED and plasmasphere erosion plumes observed from space in EUV imagery by the IMAGE satellite [2]. During the current solar cycle the global distribution of GPS receivers used in creating the TEC maps and movies has increased significantly providing near-continuous two-dimensional coverage of TEC morphology and dynamics over much the northern hemisphere mid and . . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929943 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929943
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Authors: Thomas Evan G., Yan Jingye, Zhang Jiaojiao, Baker Joseph B. H., Ruohoniemi Michael, et al.
Title: An examination of the source of decameter-scale irregularities in the geomagnetically disturbed mid-latitude ionosphere
Abstract: We present first results from a study of the plasma instability mechanism responsible for the small-scale (∼10 m) ionospheric density irregularities commonly observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radars in the vicinity of Sub Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) during periods of geomagnetic disturbance. A focus is placed on the mid-latitude region of the ionosphere over North America where recent expansion of the SuperDARN network allows for extensive direct comparisons with total electron content (TEC) measurements from a dense network of ground-based GPS receivers. The TEC observations indicate that high-speed SAPS channels and the associated small-scale irregularities are typically located within the mid-latitude ionospheric trough. The Millstone Hill Incoher. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929853 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929853
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Authors: Maurer Richard, Goldsten J O, Peplowski P N, Holmes-Siedle A G, Butler Michael, et al.
Title: Early Results from the Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) and Solar Cell Monitor on the Van Allen Probes Mission
Abstract: The Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) measures dose, dose rate and charging currents on the Van Allen Probes mission to study the dynamics of earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Early results from this monitor show a variation in dose rates with time, a correlation between the dosimeter and charging current data, a map of charging current versus orbit altitude and a comparison of cumulative dose to pre-launch modeling after 260 days. Solar cell degradation monitor patches track the decrease in solar array output as displacement damage accumulates.
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/TNS.2013.2281937 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6651707
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Authors: Liggett William, Handiboe Jon, Theus Eugene, Hartka Ted, and Navid Hadi
Title: Design of a spacecraft integration and test facility at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Abstract: The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) is dedicated to solving critical challenges as set forth by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Department of Defense. JHU/APL participates fully in the nation's formulation of space science and exploration priorities, providing the needed science, engineering, and technology, including the production and operation of unique spacecraft, instruments, and subsystems.
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836273 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836273
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Authors: Bushman Stewart
Title: Design, Fabrication, and Testing of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Propulsion Systems
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft , part of NASA’s Living with a Star program, are scheduled for launch into Earth orbit in August 2012. 1,2,3 The twin spacecraft possess identical blowdown monopropellant hydrazine propulsion systems to provide spinup/spindown, precession, Delt a–V, and deorbit capability. Each spacecraft manifests eight Aerojet 0.2 lbf (0.9 N) MR–103G thrust ers, three ARDÉ Inconel 718 propellant tanks, and other components required to control the fl ow of propellant and monitor system health and performance. The propulsion systems were fabricated and installed by Aerojet Redmond and subsequently tested at the Jo hns Hopkins University / Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, MD. The test se quence at APL included thermal balance; . . .
Date: 08/2012 Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics DOI: 10.2514/6.2012-4332 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2012-4332
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Authors: Nag Sreeja, LeMoigne Jacqueline, and de Weck Olivier
Title: Cost and risk analysis of small satellite constellations for earth observation
Abstract: Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to Earth science missions owing to their ability to increase observation sampling in spatial, spectral, temporal and angular dimensions. Past literature from academia and industry have proposed and evaluated many cost models for spacecraft as well as methods for quantifying risk. However, there have been few comprehensive studies quantifying the cost for multiple spacecraft, for small satellites and the cost risk for the operations phase of the project which needs to be budgeted for when designing and building efficient architectures. This paper identifies the three critical problems with the applicability of current cost and risk models to distributed small satellite missions and uses data-based modeling to sugges. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2014.6836396 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6836396
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, and Zhu Hui
Title: Chorus-driven acceleration of radiation belt electrons in the unusual temporal/spatial regions
Abstract: Cyclotron resonance with whistler-mode chorus waves is an important mechanism for the local acceleration of radiation belt energetic electrons. Such acceleration process has been widely investigated during the storm times, and its favored region is usually considered to be the low-density plasmatrough with magnetic local time (MLT) from midnight through dawn to noon. Here we present two case studies on the chorus-driven acceleration of radiation belt electrons in some “unusual” temporal /spatial regions. (1) The first event recorded by the Van Allen Probes during the nonstorm times from 21 to 23 February 2013. Within two days, a new radiation belt centering around L=5.8 formed and gradually merged with the original outer belt. The corresponding relativistic electron fluxes increased by. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929875 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929875
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Authors: Li W, Ni B, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Green J C, et al.
Title: Calculation of whistler-mode wave intensity using energetic electron precipitation
Abstract: The energetic electron population measured by multiple low-altitude POES satellites is used to infer whistlermode wave amplitudes using a physics-based inversion technique. We validate this technique by quantitatively analyzing a conjunction event between the Van Allen Probes and POES, and find that the inferred hiss wave amplitudes from POES electron measurements agree remarkably well with directly measured hiss waves amplitudes. We also use this technique to construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity with extensive coverage over a broad L-MLT region during the 8–9 October 2012 storm and demonstrate that the inferred chorus wave amplitudes agree well with conjugate measurements of chorus wave amplitudes from the Van Allen Probes. The evolution of the whistler-mode wave i. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929965 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929965
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Authors: Shankar Uday J, McGee Timothy G, and Kemp Brian L
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 3: Spin-Plane Dynamics, Maneuvers, and Deployment
Abstract: Several science spacecraft use long wire booms as electric-field antennas and the spacecraft spins to maintain the orientation of these flexible wires. These booms account for a majority of the total spacecraft inertia while weighing only a small fraction of the total mass. The spacecraft dynamics is therefore dominated by these booms. The analysis of such spacecraft is further complicated by other flexible ap- pendages and the presence of damping in the system, both inherent in the sys- tem and from damping mechanisms deliberately added into the system. This pa- per and two companion papers analyze such spacecraft. The first of these derives the governing nonlinear equations from first principles. Under certain conditions, the dynamics neatly separate into spin-plane and out-of-p. . .
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6204 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6204
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Authors: McGee Timothy G, Shankar Uday J, and Kemp Brian L
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 2: Out-of-Plane Dynamics and Maneuvers
Abstract: An analysis of the dynamics for a spin stabilized spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub with four long exible wire booms is presented. The analysis focuses on the dynamics out of the spin plane of the spacecraft. Companion papers will focus on the derivations of the full nonlinear dynamics and analysis of the in plane dynamics. A linear analysis is used to estimate the mode shapes of the free response of the system, the e ects of various damping mechanisms on these modes, and the dynamic response of the system to various maneuvers. The results of an independent simulation of the full nonlinear dynamics of the system are also provided to support the linear analysis. While the dynamics and analysis approach presented can be applied to the general class of spin stabilized space. . .
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6203 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6203
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Authors: Kemp Brian L, McGee Timothy G, and Shankar Uday J
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 1: Derivation of Nonlinear Dynamics
Abstract: Algebraic expressions for the governing equations of motion are developed to describe a spinning spacecraft with flexible appendages. Two limiting cases are investigated: appendages that are self-restoring and appendages that require spacecraft motion to restore. Solar panels have sufficient root stiffness to self-restore perturbations. Radial wire antennae have little intrinsic root stiffness and require centripetal acceleration from spacecraft rotations to restore perturbations. External forces applied for attitude corrections can displace spacecraft appendages from their steady-state position. The Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) satellite is used as an example to explore numerical results for several maneuvers.
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6202 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6202
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Authors: Reeves G D, Spence H E, Henderson M G, Tu W., Cunningham G. S., et al.
Title: Acceleration and loss driven by VLF chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and DREAM model results
Abstract: For over a decade now we have understood the response of the Earth's radiation belts to solar wind driving are a delicate balance of acceleration and loss processes. Theory has shown that the interaction of relativistic electrons with VLF whistler mode chorus can produce both energization through momentum diffusion and loss through pitch angle diffusion. Recent results from the Van Allen Probes mission has confirmed observationally that chorus can produce both acceleration and loss. The Van Allen Probes satellites are able to measure all the critical particle populations and wave fields with unprecedented precision and resolution but only at the two spacecraft locations. Those spatially-localized observations can be extended globally using three-dimensional diffusion codes such as the DREA. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929879 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929879
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Book Chapter
Authors: Burch L, Carovillano L, Antiochos K, Hudson M K, Elkington S R, et al.
Title: Simulation of Radiation Belt Dynamics Driven by Solar Wind Variations
Abstract: The rapid rise of relativistic electron fluxes inside geosynchronous orbit during the January 10-11, 1997, CME-driven magnetic cloud event has been simulated using a relativistic guiding center test particle code driven by out-put from a 3D global MHD simulation of the event. A comparison can be made of this event class, characterized by a moderate solar wind speed (< 600 km/s), and those commonly observed at the last solar maximum with a higher solar wind speed and shock accelerated solar energetic proton component. Relativistic electron flux increase occurred over several hours for the January event, during a period of prolonged southward IMF Bz more rapidly than the 1-2 day delay typical of flux increases driven by solar wind high speed stream interactions. Simulations of th. . .
Date: Publisher: American Geophysical Union Pages: 171 - 182 DOI: 10.1029/GM10910.1029/GM109p0171 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/GM109p0171/summary
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Authors: Spence H. E., Reeves G. D., and Kessel R. L.
Title: An Overview of Early Results from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission
Abstract: N/A
Date: Publisher: Oxford University Press DOI: N/A
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Authors: Reeves G. D., and Daglis I. A.
Title: Geospace Magnetic Storms and the Van Allen Radiation Belts
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Date: Publisher: Oxford University Press DOI: N/A
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Book
Authors: Fox N. J., and Burch J. L.
Title: The Van Allen Probes Mission
Abstract: N/A
Date: Publisher: Springer Pages: 646 DOI: N/A Available at: http://www.springer.com/astronomy/extraterrestrial+physics,+space+sciences/book/978-1-4899-7432-7
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Authors: Elkington Scot R, Takahashi K, Chi Peter J, Denton Richard E, and Lysak Robert L
Title: A review of ULF interactions with radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Energetic particle fluxes in the outer zone radiation belts can vary over orders of magnitude on a variety of timescales. Power at ULF frequencies, on the order of a few millihertz, have been associated with changes in flux levels among relativis- tic electrons comprising the outer zone of the radiation belts. Power in this part of the spectrum may occur as a result of a number of processes, including internally- generated waves induced by plasma instabilities, and externally generated processes such as shear instabilities at the flanks or compressive variations in the solar wind. Changes in the large-scale convective motion of the magnetosphere are another important class of externally driven variations with power at ULF wavelengths. The mechanism for interaction between ULF vari. . .
Date: Publisher: American Geophysical Union Pages: 177 - 193 DOI: 10.1029/169GM12 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/169GM12/summary
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