Biblio

Found 876 results
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
W
Authors: Whittaker Ian C., Rodger Craig J., Clilverd Mark A., and Sauvaud é
Title: The effects and correction of the geometric factor for the POES/MEPED electron flux instrument using a multisatellite comparison
Abstract: Measurements from the Polar-Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instrument are widely used in studies into radiation belt dynamics and atmospheric coupling. However, this instrument has been shown to have a complex energy-dependent response to incident particle fluxes, with the additional possibility of low-energy protons contaminating the electron fluxes. We test the recent Monte Carlo theoretical simulation of the instrument by comparing the responses against observations from an independent experimental data set. Our study examines the reported geometric factors for the MEPED electron flux instrument against the high-energy resolution Instrument for Detecting Particles (IDPs) on the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 6386 - 6404 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020021 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020021
More Details
Authors: Whittaker Ian C., Gamble Rory J., Rodger Craig J., Clilverd Mark A., and Sauvaud é
Title: Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times
Abstract: The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electron spectra from DEMETER have been analyzed from all six years of its operation, and three fit types (power law, exponential, and kappa-type) have been applied to the precipitating flux observations. We show that the power law fit consistently provides the best representation of the flux and that the ka. . .
Date: 12/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7611 - 7623 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019228 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019228
More Details
Authors: Whittaker Ian C., Clilverd Mark A., and Rodger Craig J.
Title: Characteristics of precipitating energetic electron fluxes relative to the plasmapause during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: n this study we investigate the link between precipitating electrons from the Van Allen radiation belts and the dynamical plasmapause. We consider electron precipitation observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) constellation during geomagnetic storms. Superposed epoch analysis is performed on precipitating electron observations for the 13 year period of 1999 to 2012 in two magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, morning and afternoon. We assume that the precipitation is due to wave-particle interactions and our two MLT sectors focus on chorus (outside the plasmapause) and plasmaspheric hiss (inside the plasmapause) waves. We generate simple expressions based on the geomagnetic index, Dst, which reproduce the chorus-driven observations for the >30 keV precipitating ele. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020446 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020446
More Details
Authors: Westlake J. H., Cohen I. J., Mauk B H, Anderson B J, Mitchell D G, et al.
Title: The permeability of the magnetopause to a multispecies substorm injection of energetic particles
Abstract: Leakage of ions from the magnetosphere into the magnetosheath remains an important topic in understanding the plasma physics of Earth's magnetopause and the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere. Here using sophisticated instrumentation from two spacecraft (Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment on the Van Allen Probes and Energetic Ion Spectrometer on the Magnetospheric Multiscale) spaced uniquely near and outside the dayside magnetopause, we are able to determine the escape mechanisms for large gyroradii oxygen ions and much smaller gyroradii hydrogen and helium ions. The oxygen ions are entrained on the magnetosphere boundary, while the hydrogen and helium ions appear to escape along reconnected field lines. These results have important implications for no. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL070189 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL070189/full
More Details
Authors: West H I, Buck R M, and Davidson G T
Title: The Dynamics of Energetic Electrons in the Earth’s Outer Radiation Belt During 1968 as Observed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Spectrometer on Ogo 5
Abstract: An account is given of measurements of electrons made by the LLNL magnetic electron spectrometer (60–3000 keV in seven differential energy channels) on the Ogo 5 satellite in the earth's outer-belt regions during 1968 and early 1969. The data were analyzed to identify those features dominated by pitch angle and radial diffusion; in doing so all aspects of phase space covered by the data were studied, including pitch angle distributions and spectral features, as well as decay rates. The pitch angle distributions are reported elsewhere. The spectra observed in the weeks after a storm at L ∼3–4.5 show the evolution of a peak at ∼1.5 MeV and pronounced minima at ∼0.5 MeV. The observed pitch angle diffusion lifetimes are identified as being the shortest decays observed and are found t. . .
Date: 04/1981 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 2111 - 2142 DOI: 10.1029/JA086iA04p02111 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA086iA04p02111/abstract
More Details
Authors: Wei Dong, Yu Yiqun, and He Fei
Title: The Magnetospheric Driving Source of Double‐Peak Subauroral Ion Drifts: Double Ring Current Pressure Peaks
Abstract: Double‐peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), characterized by two high‐speed flow channels, is a newly identified flow structure in the subauroral ionosphere. He et al. (2016, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016GL069133) proposed that two region 2 field‐aligned currents (R2 FACs) might cause the DSAIDs. However, the underlying physical process that drives the double R2 FACs is unknown. This study reports a DSAIDs event and reveals its magnetospheric drivers. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F18 satellite observed DSAIDs in the duskside subauroral region, which corresponded well to two low‐density troughs and two R2 FACs. The Van Allen Probe B demonstrated that intense substorm ion injections recurrently occurred prior to the formation of DSAIDs, suggesting a potential magnetospheri. . .
Date: 06/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083186 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL083186
More Details
Authors: Wei Chao, Dai Lei, Duan Suping, Wang Chi, Wang YuXian, et al.
Title: Multiple satellites observation evidence: High-m Poloidal ULF waves with time-varying polarization states
Abstract: We report multi‐spacecraft observations of ULF waves from Van Allen Probes (RBSP), Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS), and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). On August 31, 2015, global‐scale poloidal waves were observed in data from RBSP‐B, GOES and THEMIS from L=4 to L=8 over a wide range of magnetic local time (MLT). The polarization states varied towards purely poloidal polarity. In two consecutive orbits over 18 hours, RBSP‐A and RBSP‐B recorded gradual variation of the polarization states of the poloidal waves; the ratio (|Ba|/|Br|) decreased from 0.82 to 0.13. After the variation of polarization states, the poloidal ULF waves became very purely poloidal waves, localized in both. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Earth and Planetary Physics Pages: 190 - 203 DOI: 10.26464/epp2019021 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.26464/epp2019021
More Details
Authors: Wang X., Malaspina D. M., Hsu H.-W., Ergun R. E., and M. Horányi.
Title: The effects of magnetic fields on photoelectron-mediated spacecraft potential fluctuations
Abstract: Previously, we have experimentally studied photoelectron-mediated spacecraft potential fluctuations associated with time-dependent external electric fields. In this paper, we investigate the effects of magnetic fields on such spacecraft potential fluctuations. A magnetic field is created above the UV-illuminated surface of a spacecraft model to alter the escape rate of photoelectrons. The packet of the observed potential oscillations becomes less positive with increasing magnetic field strength because more of the emitted photoelectrons are returned to the surface. As a result, the photoelectric charging time is increased, corresponding to a decrease in the response frequency of the photoemitting surface. The amplitude of the potential oscillations decreases when the response frequency bec. . .
Date: 09/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7319 - 7326 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.910.1002/2014JA019923 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.9http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019923
More Details
Authors: Wang Chih-Ping, Xing Xiaoyan, Nakamura T. K. M., Lyons Larry R., and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Source and structure of bursty hot electron enhancements in the tail magnetosheath: Simultaneous two-probe observation by ARTEMIS
Abstract: Bursty enhancements of hot electrons (≳0.5 keV) with duration of minutes sometimes occur in the tail magnetosheath. In this study we used the unique simultaneous measurements from the two Acceleration Reconnection Turbulence and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun probes to investigate the likely sources, spatial structures, and responsible processes for these hot electron enhancements. The enhancements can be seen at any distance across the magnetosheath, but those closer to the magnetopause are more often accompanied by magnetosheath density and flow magnitudes changing to more magnetosphere-like values. From simultaneous measurements with the two probes being on either side of magnetopause or both in the magnetosheath, it is evident that these hot electrons come from . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020603 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020603
More Details
Authors: Wang Zihan, Zou Shasha, Shepherd Simon G., Liang Jun, Gjerloev Jesper W., et al.
Title: Multi‐instrument Observations of Mesoscale Enhancement of Subauroral Polarization Stream Associated With an Injection
Abstract: Subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) prefer geomagnetically disturbed conditions and strongly correlate with geomagnetic indexes. However, the temporal evolution of SAPS and its relationship with dynamic and structured ring current and particle injection are still not well understood. In this study, we performed detailed analysis of temporal evolution of SAPS during a moderate storm on 18 May 2013 using conjugate observations of SAPS from the Van Allen Probes (VAP) and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The large‐scale SAPS (LS‐SAPS) formed during the main phase of this storm and decayed due to the northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. A mesoscale (approximately several hundreds of kilometers zonally) enhancement of SAPS was observed by SuperDARN at 0. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1770 - 1784 DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026535 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026535
More Details
Authors: Wang Dedong, Yuan Zhigang, Yu Xiongdong, Deng Xiaohua, Zhou Meng, et al.
Title: Statistical characteristic of EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations
Abstract: Utilizing the data from the magnetometer instrument which is a part of the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument suite onboard the Van Allen Probe A from Sep. 2012 to Apr. 2014, when the apogee of the satellite has passed all the MLT sectors, we obtain the statistical distribution characteristic of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere over all local times from L=3 to L=6. Compared with the previous statistical results about EMIC waves, the occurrence rates of EMIC waves distribute relatively uniform in the MLT sectors in lower L-shells. On the other hand, in higher L-shells, there are indeed some peaks of the occurrence rate for the EMIC waves, especially in the noon, dusk and night sectors. EMIC waves appear at lower L-shells in the dawn. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021089 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021089
More Details
Authors: Wang Chih-Ping, Thorne Richard, Liu Terry Z., Hartinger Michael D., Nagai Tsugunobu, et al.
Title: A multi-spacecraft event study of Pc5 ultra low frequency waves in the magnetosphere and their external drivers
Abstract: We investigate a quiet-time event of magnetospheric Pc5 ultra low frequency (ULF) waves and their likely external drivers using multiple spacecraft observations. Enhancements of electric and magnetic field perturbations in two narrow frequency bands, 1.5-2 mHz and 3.5-4 mHz, were observed over a large radial distance range from r ~5 to 11 RE. During the first half of this event, perturbations were mainly observed in the transverse components and only in the 3.5-4 mHz band. In comparison, enhancements were stronger during the second half in both transverse and compressional components and in both frequency bands. No indication of field line resonances was found for these magnetic field perturbations. Perturbations in these two bands were also observed in the magnetosheath, but not in the so. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023610 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023610/full
More Details
Authors: Wang C., Rankin R, Wang Y., Zong Q.-G., Zhou X., et al.
Title: Poloidal mode wave-particle interactions inferred from Van Allen Probes and CARISMA ground-based observations
Abstract: Ultra‐low‐frequency (ULF) wave and test particle models are used to investigate the pitch angle and energy dependence of ion differential fluxes measured by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft on October 6th, 2012. Analysis of the satellite data reveals modulations in differential flux resulting from drift resonance between H+ ions and fundamental mode poloidal Alfvén waves detected near the magnetic equator at L∼5.7. Results obtained from simulations reproduce important features of the observations, including a substantial enhancement of the differential flux between ∼20° − 40° pitch angle for ion energies between ∼90 − 220keV, and an absence of flux modulations at 90°. The numerical results confirm predictions of drift‐bounce resonance theory and show good quantit. . .
Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA025123 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA025123
More Details
Authors: Wang X., Malaspina D. M., Ergun R. E., and M. Horányi.
Title: Photoelectron-mediated spacecraft potential fluctuations
Abstract: Electric field fluctuations such as those due to plasma waves in Earth's magnetosphere may modulate photoelectrons emitted from spacecraft surface, causing fluctuations in spacecraft potential. We experimentally investigate such photoelectron-mediated spacecraft potential fluctuations. The photoelectric charge of a spacecraft model is found to increase with increasing applied electric field as more photoelectrons escape the spacecraft model surface and dissipates with a decrease in the electric field through collection of ambient plasma electrons. When the applied electric field is driven to oscillate at a frequency lower than the response frequency of the spacecraft model, the surface potential follows the electric field oscillations. The spacecraft model maintains an approximately consta. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1094 - 1101 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019502 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019502
More Details
Authors: Wang Chengrui, Rankin Robert, and Zong Qiugang
Title: Fast damping of ultralow frequency waves excited by interplanetary shocks in the magnetosphere
Abstract: Analysis of Cluster spacecraft data shows that intense ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere can be excited by the impact of interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations. The observations reveal that such waves can be damped away rapidly in a few tens of minutes. Here we examine mechanisms of ULF wave damping for two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001. The mechanisms considered are ionospheric joule heating, Landau damping, and waveguide energy propagation. It is shown that Landau damping provides the dominant ULF wave damping for the shock events of interest. It is further demonstrated that damping is caused by drift-bounce resonance with ions in the energy range of a few keV. Landau damping is shown to b. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020761 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020761
More Details
Authors: Wang Hui, He Yangfan, ühr Hermann, Kistler Lynn, Saikin Anthony, et al.
Title: Storm Time EMIC Waves Observed by Swarm and Van Allen Probe Satellites
Abstract: The temporal and spatial evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the magnetic storm of 21–29 June 2015 was investigated using high‐resolution magnetic field observations from Swarm constellation in the ionosphere and Van Allen Probes in the magnetosphere. Magnetospheric EMIC waves had a maximum occurrence frequency in the afternoon sector and shifted equatorward during the expansion phase and poleward during the recovery phase. However, ionospheric waves in subauroral regions occurred more frequently in the nighttime than during the day and exhibited less obvious latitudinal movements. During the main phase, dayside EMIC waves occurred in both the ionosphere and magnetosphere in response to the dramatic increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure. Waves were abse. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 293 - 312 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026299 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026299
More Details
Authors: Walsh B. M., Thomas E. G., Hwang K.-J., Baker J. B. H., Ruohoniemi J. M., et al.
Title: Dense plasma and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at Earth's dayside magnetopause
Abstract: Spacecraft observations of boundary waves at the dayside terrestrial magnetopause and their ground-based signatures are presented. Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft measured boundary waves at the magnetopause while ground-based HF radar measured corresponding signatures in the ionosphere indicating a large-scale response and tailward propagating waves. The properties of the oscillations are consistent with linear phase Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetopause boundary. During this time period multiple THEMIS spacecraft also measured a plasmaspheric plume contacting the local magnetopause and mass loading the boundary. Previous work has demonstrated that increasing the density at the magnetopause can lower the efficiency of reconnec. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021014 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021014
More Details
V
Authors: Vernov S N, Gorchakov E V, Kuznetsov S N, Logachev Yu. I, Sosnovets E N, et al.
Title: Particle fluxes in the outer geomagnetic field
Abstract: The outer geomagnetic field comprises the outer radiation belt, consisting of electrons with energies of 104–107 ev, and the unstable radiation zone. The outer radiation belt is bounded on its inner side by a gap, which is at various times located at a distance of 2.2–3.5 RE and in which a considerable precipitation of electrons from radiation belts occurs, possibly owing to a high intensity of electromagnetic waves. The boundary separating the outer radiation belt from the unstable radiation zone is at λ ∼ 71° and ∼9 RE in the equatorial plane on the sunlit side, and at 7–8 RE in the equatorial plane on the nightside. Beyond this, the unstable radiation zone extends out to the magnetosphere boundary and up to λ ∼ 77° on the sunlit side, and out to 14–15 RE on the nightsi. . .
Date: 02/1969 Publisher: Reviews of Geophysics Pages: 257-280 DOI: 10.1029/RG007i001p00257 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/RG007i001p00257/abstract
More Details
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, Bonnell J. W., Artemyev A. V., et al.
Title: Electron-acoustic solitons and double layers in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes observe generally two types of electrostatic solitary waves (ESW) contributing to the broadband electrostatic wave activity in the nightside inner magnetosphere. ESW with symmetric bipolar parallel electric field are electron phase space holes. The nature of ESW with asymmetric bipolar (and almost unipolar) parallel electric field has remained puzzling. To address their nature, we consider a particular event observed by Van Allen Probes to argue that during the broadband wave activity electrons with energy above 200 eV provide the dominant contribution to the total electron density, while the density of cold electrons (below a few eV) is less than a few tenths of the total electron density. We show that velocities of the asymmetric ESW are close to velocity of electron. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074026 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074026/full
More Details
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, Artemyev A. V., Drake J. F., et al.
Title: Electron holes in the outer radiation belt: Characteristics and their role in electron energization
Abstract: Van Allen Probes have detected electron holes (EHs) around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. Presumably generated near equator, EHs propagate to higher latitudes potentially resulting in energization of electrons trapped within EHs. This process has been recently shown to provide electrons with energies up to several tens of keV and requires EH propagation up to rather high latitudes. We have analyzed more than 100 EHs observed around a particular injection to determine their kinetic structure and potential energy sources supporting the energization of trapped electrons. EHs propagate with velocities from 1000 to 20,000 km/s (a few times larger than the thermal velocity of the coldest background electron population). The parallel scale of observed EHs is from 0.3 to 3 km that i. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023083 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023083/full
More Details
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, and Artemyev A. V.
Title: Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions
Abstract: Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi me. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021644 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021644http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021644
More Details
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, Artemyev A. V., Krasnoselskikh V. V., et al.
Title: Diffusive scattering of electrons by electron holes around injection fronts
Abstract: Van Allen Probes have detected nonlinear electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes include electron holes (EH), double layers, and more complicated solitary waves. We show that EHs can efficiently scatter electrons due to their substantial transverse electric fields. Although the electron scattering driven by EHs is diffusive, it cannot be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory. We derive analytical formulas describing local electron scattering by a single EH and verify them via test particle simulations. We show that the most efficiently scattered are gyroresonant electrons (crossing EH on a time scale comparable to the local electron gyroperiod). We compute bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the . . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023337 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023337/full
More Details
Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F, Artemyev A. V., and Jovanovic D.
Title: Magnetic field depression within electron holes
Abstract: We analyze electron holes that are spikes of the electrostatic field (up to 500 mV/m) observed by Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt. The unexpected feature is the magnetic field depression of about several tens of picotesla within many of the spikes. The earlier observations showed amplification or negligible perturbations of the magnetic field within the electron holes. We suggest that the observed magnetic field depression is due to the diamagnetic current of hot and highly anisotropic population of electrons trapped within the electron holes. The required trapped population should have a density up to 65% of the background plasma density, a temperature up to several keV, and a temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥∼2. We argue that the observed electron holes could be generated. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2123 - 2129 DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063370 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063370
More Details
Authors: Valek P. W., Goldstein J, Jahn J -M, McComas D J, and Spence H E
Title: First joint in situ and global observations of the medium-energy oxygen and hydrogen in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We present the first simultaneous observations of the in situ ions and global Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images of the composition-separated, medium-energy (~1–50 keV) particle populations of the inner magnetosphere. The ENA emissions are mapped into L shell/magnetic local time space based on the exospheric density along the line of sight (LOS). The ENA measurement can then be scaled to determine an average ion flux along a given LOS. The in situ ion flux tends to be larger than the scaled ENAs at the same local time. This indicates that the ion population is more concentrated in the Van Allen Probes orbital plane than distributed along the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers LOS. For the large storm of 14 November 2012, we observe that the concentration of O (in situ i. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7615 - 7628 DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021151 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021151http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021151
More Details
Authors: Vainchtein D., Zhang X.-J., Artemyev A. V., Mourenas D., Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: Evolution of electron distribution driven by nonlinear resonances with intense field-aligned chorus waves
Abstract: Resonant electron interaction with whistler‐mode chorus waves is recognized as one of the main drivers of radiation belt dynamics. For moderate wave intensity, this interaction is well described by quasi‐linear theory. However, recent statistics of parallel propagating chorus waves have demonstrated that 5 − 20% of the observed waves are sufficiently intense to interact nonlinearly with electrons. Such interactions include phase trapping and phase bunching (nonlinear scattering) effects not described by quasi‐linear diffusion. For sufficiently long (large) wave‐packets, these nonlinear effects can result in very rapid electron acceleration and scattering. In this paper we introduce a method to include trapping and nonlinear scattering into the kinetic equation describing the . . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025654 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025654
More Details
U
Authors: Usanova M. E., Malaspina D. M., Jaynes A. N., Bruder R. J., Mann I. R., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes observations of oxygen cyclotron harmonic waves in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the oxygen cyclotron frequency and its harmonics have been regularly observed on the Van Allen Probes satellites during geomagnetic storms. We focus on properties of these waves and present events from the main phase of two storms on 1 November 2012 and 17 March 2013 and associated dropouts of a few MeV electron fluxes. They are electromagnetic, in the frequency range ~0.5 to several Hz, and amplitude ~0.1 to a few nT in magnetic and ~0.1 to a few mV/m in electric field, with both the wave velocity and the Poynting vector directed almost parallel to the background magnetic field. These properties are very similar to those of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are believed to contribute to loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electro. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 8827 - 8834 DOI: 10.1002/grl.v43.1710.1002/2016GL070233 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL070233/abstract
More Details
Authors: Usanova M. E., Drozdov A., Orlova K., Mann I. R., Shprits Y., et al.
Title: Effect of EMIC waves on relativistic and ultrarelativistic electron populations: Ground-based and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: We study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the loss and pitch angle scattering of relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on 11 October 2012. The EMIC wave activity was observed in situ on the Van Allen Probes and conjugately on the ground across the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity throughout an extended 18 h interval. However, neither enhanced precipitation of >0.7 MeV electrons nor reductions in Van Allen Probe 90° pitch angle ultrarelativistic electron flux were observed. Computed radiation belt electron pitch angle diffusion rates demonstrate that rapid pitch angle diffusion is confined to low pitch angles and cannot reach 90°. For the first time, from both obse. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 1375 - 1381 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL059024 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL059024
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A. Y., Sitnov M. I., Merkin V. G., Gkioulidou M., and Mitchell D. G.
Title: Acceleration at Dipolarization Fronts in the Inner Magnetosphere
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere is controlled by energetic ions of tens to hundreds keV. Plasma pressure is the source of global storm-time currents, which control the distribution of magnetic field and couple the inner magnetosphere and the ionosphere. Recent analysis showed that the buildup of hot ion population in the inner magnetosphere largely occurs in the form of localized discrete injections associated with sharp dipolarizations of magnetic field, similar to dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail. Because of significant differences between the ambient magnetic field and the dipolarization front properties in the magnetotail and the inner magnetosphere, the physical mechanisms of ion acceleration at dipolarization fronts in these two regions ma. . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016ja023304 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023304
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sorathia K. A., Merkin V. G., Sitnov M I, Mitchell D G, et al.
Title: Ion Trapping and Acceleration at Dipolarization Fronts: High-Resolution MHD/Test-Particle Simulations
Abstract: Much of plasma heating and transport from the magnetotail into the inner magnetosphere occurs in the form of mesoscale discrete injections associated with sharp dipolarizations of magnetic field (dipolarization fronts). In this paper we investigate the role of magnetic trapping in acceleration and transport of the plasmasheet ions into the ring current. For this purpose we use high‐resolution global MHD and three‐dimensional test‐particle simulations. It is shown that trapping, produced by sharp magnetic field gradients at the interface between dipolarizations and the ambient plasma, affect plasmasheet protons with energies above approximately 10 keV, enabling their transport across more than 10 Earth radii and acceleration by a factor of 10. Our estimates show that trapping is impor. . .
Date: 06/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025370 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025370
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Merkin V. G., and Artemyev A. V.
Title: Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts
Abstract: [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processe. . .
Date: 01/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4952–4962, DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50452 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.50452
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Takahashi K, Anderson B. J., and Korth H.
Title: Impact of toroidal ULF waves on the outer radiation belt electrons
Abstract: Relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit highly variable complex behavior. Previous studies have established a strong correlation of electron fluxes and the inner magnetospheric ULF waves in the Pc 3–5 frequency range. Resonant interaction of ULF waves with the drift motion of radiation belt electrons violates their third adiabatic invariant and consequently leads to their radial transport. If the wave-particle interaction has a stochastic character, then the electron transport is diffusive. The goal of this paper is to analyze the impact of toroidal ULF waves on radiation belt electrons. The study is based on direct measurements of ULF electric fields on the CRRES spacecraft. We show that the electric fields of inner magnetospheric toroidal ULF waves exhibit high. . .
Date: 10/2005 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2005JA011017 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2005JA011017/abstract
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Millan R M, Kress B T, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt
Abstract: The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (>0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity, electron intensities in the belt can vary by ordersof magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the main-phase depletions: adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused by the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere, and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the adiabatic effect and magnetopause . . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020645 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020645
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Merkin V. G., Gkioulidou M., and Mitchell D G
Title: Ion acceleration at dipolarization fronts in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere is controlled by energetic ions of tens to hundreds of keV. Plasma pressure is the source of global storm time currents, which control the distribution of magnetic field and couple the inner magnetosphere and the ionosphere. Recent analysis showed that the buildup of hot ion population in the inner magnetosphere largely occurs in the form of localized discrete injections associated with sharp dipolarizations of magnetic field, similar to dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail. Because of significant differences between the ambient magnetic field and the dipolarization front properties in the magnetotail and the inner magnetosphere, the physical mechanisms of ion acceleration at dipolarization fronts in these two regions. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023304 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023304
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Mitchell D G, Takahashi K, Lanzerotti L J, et al.
Title: Rotationally driven ‘zebra stripes’ in Earth’s inner radiation belt
Abstract: Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity1, 2, 3, 4. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn5, 6, 7, 8, 9, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth’s rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1–2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth’s inner radiation belt are organize. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: Nature Pages: 338 - 340 DOI: 10.1038/nature13046 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature13046
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Anderson B J, Brandt P C, and Tsyganenko N A
Title: Storm time evolution of the outer radiation belt: Transport and losses
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms the magnetic field of the inner magnetosphere exhibits large-scale variations over timescales from minutes to days. Being mainly controlled by the magnetic field the motion of relativistic electrons of the outer radiation belt can be highly susceptible to its variations. This paper investigates evolution of the outer belt during the 7 September 2002 storm. Evolution of electron phase space density is calculated with the use of a test-particle simulation in storm time magnetic and electric fields. The results show that storm time intensification of the ring current produces a large impact on the belt. In contrast to the conventional Dst effect the dominant effects are nonadiabatic and lead to profound and irreversible transformations of the belt. The diamagnetic in. . .
Date: 11/2006 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011690 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA011690/abstract
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy Aleksandr Y., Mauk Barry H., Fox Nicola J., Sibeck David G., and Grebowsky Joseph M.
Title: Radiation belt storm probes: Resolving fundamental physics with practical consequences
Abstract: The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.
Date: 07/2011 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1417 - 1424 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2010.12.005 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682610003688
More Details
Authors: UKHORSKIY A, and SITNOV M
Title: Radial transport in the outer radiation belt due to global magnetospheric compressions
Abstract: Earth's outer radiation belt is populated by relativistic electrons that produce a complex dynamical response to varying geomagnetic activity. One fundamental process defining global state of the belt is radial transport of electrons across their drift shells. Radial transport is induced by resonant interaction of electron drift motion with ULF oscillations of electric and magnetic fields and is commonly believed to be a diffusive process. The goal of this paper is the analysis of radial transport due to typical ULF fluctuations in the inner magnetospheric fields. For this purpose a test-particle approach is used in the guiding center approximation. In particular we consider ULF oscillations due to global magnetospheric compressions. It is shown that typical pressure variations induce larg. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1714 - 1726 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001971
More Details
Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, and Sitnov M I
Title: Dynamics of Radiation Belt Particles
Abstract: This paper reviews basic concepts of particle dynamics underlying theoretical aspect of radiation belt modeling and data analysis. We outline the theory of adiabatic invariants of quasiperiodic Hamiltonian systems and derive the invariants of particle motion trapped in the radiation belts. We discuss how the nonlinearity of resonant interaction of particles with small-amplitude plasma waves, ubiquitous across the inner magnetosphere, can make particle motion stochastic. Long-term evolution of a stochastic system can be described by the Fokker-Plank (diffusion) equation. We derive the kinetic equation of particle diffusion in the invariant space and discuss its limitations and associated challenges which need to be addressed in forthcoming radiation belt models and data analysis.
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 545-578 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9938-5 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9938-5
More Details
T
Authors: Tyler E., Breneman A., Cattell C., Wygant J, Thaller S., et al.
Title: Statistical occurrence and distribution of high amplitude whistler-mode waves in the outer radiation belt
Abstract: We present the first statistical analysis with continuous data coverage and non‐averaged amplitudes of the prevalence and distribution of high‐amplitude (> 5 mV/m) whistler‐mode waves in the outer radiation belt using 5 years of Van Allen Probes data. These waves are most common above L=3.5 and between MLT of 0‐7 where they are present 1‐4% of the time. During high geomagnetic activity, high‐amplitude whistler‐mode wave occurrence rises above 30% in some regions. During these active times the plasmasphere erodes to lower L and high‐amplitude waves are observed at all L outside of it, with the highest occurrence at low L (3.5‐4) in the pre‐dawn sector. These results have important implications for modeling radiation belt particle interactions with chorus, as large‐amp. . .
Date: 02/2019 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082292 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019GL082292
More Details
Authors: Turunen Esa, Kero Antti, Verronen Pekka T., Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Oyama Shin-Ichiro, et al.
Title: Mesospheric ozone destruction by high-energy electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora
Abstract: Energetic particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere creates excess amounts of odd nitrogen and odd hydrogen. These destroy mesospheric and upper stratospheric ozone in catalytic reaction chains, either in situ at the altitude of the energy deposition or indirectly due to transport to other altitudes and latitudes. Recent statistical analysis of satellite data on mesospheric ozone reveals that the variations during energetic electron precipitation from Earth's radiation belts can be tens of percent. Here we report model calculations of ozone destruction due to a single event of pulsating aurora early in the morning on 17 November 2012. The presence of high-energy component in the precipitating electron flux (>200 keV) was detected as ionization down to 68 km altitude, by the VHF inco. . .
Date: 10/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Pages: 11,852 - 11,861 DOI: 10.1002/2016JD025015 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JD025015/full
More Details
Authors: Turney D, Matiella Novak A, Beisser K, and Fox N
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach Program
Abstract: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program serves as a pipeline of activities to inspire and educate a broad audience about Heliophysics and the Sun-Earth system, specifically the Van Allen Radiation Belts. The program is comprised of a variety of formal, informal and public outreach activities that all align with the NASA Education Portfolio Strategic Framework outcomes. These include lesson plans and curriculum for use in the classroom, teacher workshops, internship opportunities, activities that target underserved populations, collaboration with science centers and NASA visitors’ centers and partnerships with experts in the Heliophysics and education disciplines. This paper will detail the activities that make up the RBSP E/PO program, their in. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 617-646 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9945-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9945-6
More Details
Authors: Turner Drew L, Shprits Yuri, Hartinger Michael, and Angelopoulos Vassilis
Title: Explaining sudden losses of outer radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms
Abstract: The Van Allen radiation belts were first discovered in 1958 by the Explorer series of spacecraft1. The dynamic outer belt consists primarily of relativistic electrons trapped by the Earth’s magnetic field. Magnetospheric processes driven by the solar wind2 cause the electron flux in this belt to fluctuate substantially over timescales ranging from minutes to years3. The most dramatic of these events are known as flux ’dropouts’ and often occur during geomagnetic storms. During such an event the electron flux can drop by several orders of magnitude in just a few hours4, 5 and remain low even after a storm has abated. Various solar wind phenomena, including coronal mass ejections and co-rotating interaction regions6, can drive storm activity, but several outstanding questions remain co. . .
Date: 01/2012 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Pages: 208–212 DOI: 10.1038/nphys2185 Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2185
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Morley S. K., Henderson M G, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: On the cause and extent of outer radiation belt losses during the 30 September 2012 dropout event
Abstract: On 30 September 2012, a flux “dropout” occurred throughout Earth's outer electron radiation belt during the main phase of a strong geomagnetic storm. Using eight spacecraft from NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes missions and NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites constellation, we examined the full extent and timescales of the dropout based on particle energy, equatorial pitch angle, radial distance, and species. We calculated phase space densities of relativistic electrons, in adiabatic invariant coordinates, which revealed that loss processes during the dropout were > 90% effective throughout the majority of the outer belt and the plasmapause played a key role in limiting the spatial extent . . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1530 - 1540 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019446 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019446
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Angelopoulos V, Li W, Bortnik J, Ni B, et al.
Title: Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc. . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1960 - 1979 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v119.310.1002/2014JA019770 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v119.3http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019770
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Clemmons J. H., Mauk B H, et al.
Title: Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission
Abstract: We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increa. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 7785 - 7794 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069691 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069691
More Details
Authors: Turner Drew L
Title: Space science: Near-Earth space shows its stripes
Abstract: Using some of the first scientific satellites put into orbit during the late 1950s, teams led by physicists James Van Allen in the United States and Sergei Vernov in the Soviet Union independently reported1, 2 on defined regions of radiation in near-Earth space. These regions came to be known as Earth's radiation belts, and they represent the first major scientific discovery of the space age. However, despite decades of study, many questions in radiation-belt physics remain unanswered, mostly concerning the nature of the inner and outer belts, which are populated by electrons moving at near the speed of light. As society becomes ever more dependent on satellite-based technology, it is increasingly important to understand the variability in the radiation belts, because the highest-energy . . .
Date: 03/2014 Publisher: Nature Pages: 308 - 309 DOI: 10.1038/507308a Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/507308a
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., O'Brien T P, Blake J B, et al.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere associated with substorm activity
Abstract: From a survey of the first nightside season of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission (Dec/2012 – Sep/2013), 47 energetic (10s to 100s of keV) electron injection events were found at L-shells ≤ 4, all of which are deeper than any previously reported substorm-related injections. Preliminary details from these events are presented, including how: all occurred shortly after dipolarization signatures and injections were observed at higher L-shells; the deepest observed injection was at L~2.5; and, surprisingly, L≤4 injections are limited in energy to ≤250 keV. We present a detailed case study of one example event revealing that the injection of electrons down to L~3.5 was different from injections observed at higher L and likely resulted from drift resonance with a fast magnetosonic wave in t. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063225 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063225
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Fennell J. F., Blake J B, Claudepierre S G, Clemmons J. H., et al.
Title: Multipoint observations of energetic particle injections and substorm activity during a conjunction between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes
Abstract: This study examines multipoint observations during a conjunction between MMS and Van Allen Probes on 07 April 2016 in which a series of energetic particle injections occurred. With complementary data from THEMIS, Geotail, and LANL-GEO (16 spacecraft in total), we develop new insights on the nature of energetic particle injections associated with substorm activity. Despite this case involving only weak substorm activity (max. AE < 300 nT) during quiet geomagnetic conditions in steady, below-average solar wind, a complex series of at least six different electron injections was observed throughout the system. Intriguingly, only one corresponding ion injection was clearly observed. All ion and electron injections were observed at < 600 keV only. MMS reveals detailed substructure within the lar. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024554 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024554/full
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Claudepierre S G, O'Brien T P, et al.
Title: The Response of Earth's Electron Radiation Belts to Geomagnetic Storms: Statistics From the Van Allen Probes Era Including Effects From Different Storm Drivers
Abstract: A statistical study was conducted of Earth's radiation belt electron response to geomagnetic storms using NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Data for electrons with energies ranging from 30 keV to 6.3 MeV were included and examined as a function of L‐shell, energy, and epoch time during 110 storms with SYM‐H ≤−50 nT during September 2012 to September 2017 (inclusive). The radiation belt response revealed clear energy and L‐shell dependencies, with tens of keV electrons enhanced at all L‐shells (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6) in all storms during the storm commencement and main phase and then quickly decaying away during the early recovery phase, low hundreds of keV electrons enhanced at lower L‐shells (~3 ≤ L ≤ ~4) in upward of 90% of all storms and then decaying gradually during the rec. . .
Date: 01/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026066 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026066
More Details
Authors: Turner D. L., O'Brien T P, Fennell J. F., Claudepierre S G, Blake J B, et al.
Title: The effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons in Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: We use Van Allen Probes data to investigate the responses of 10s of keV to 2 MeV electrons throughout a broad range of the radiation belts (2.5 ≤ L ≤ 6.0) during 52 geomagnetic storms from the most recent solar maximum. Electron storm-time responses are highly dependent on both electron energy and L-shell. 10s of keV electrons typically have peak fluxes in the inner belt or near-Earth plasma sheet and fill the inner magnetosphere during storm main phases. ~100 to ~600 keV electrons are enhanced in up to 87% of cases around L~3.7, and their peak flux location moves to lower L-shells during storm recovery phases. Relativistic electrons (≥~1 MeV) are nearly equally likely to produce enhancement, depletion, and no-change events in the outer belt. We also show that the L-shell of peak flu. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064747 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064747
More Details

Pages