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Authors: O’Brien T P, Lorentzen K. R., Mann I. R., Meredith N. P., Blake J. B., et al.
Title: Energization of relativistic electrons in the presence of ULF power and MeV microbursts: Evidence for dual ULF and VLF acceleration
Abstract: We examine signatures of two types of waves that may be involved in the acceleration of energetic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belts. We have compiled a database of ULF wave power from SAMNET and IMAGE ground magnetometer stations for 1987–2001. Long-duration, comprehensive, in situ VLF/ELF chorus wave observations are not available, so we infer chorus wave activity from low-altitude SAMPEX observations of MeV electron microbursts for 1996–2001 since microbursts are thought to be caused by interactions between chorus and trapped electrons. We compare the ULF and microburst observations to in situ trapped electrons observed by high-altitude satellites from 1989–2001. We find that electron acceleration at low L shells is closely associated with both ULF activity and MeV microbu. . .
Date: 08/2003 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2002JA009784 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JA009784/abstract
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Authors: O’Brien T P, Lorentzen K. R., Mann I. R., Meredith N. P., Blake J. B., et al.
Title: Energization of relativistic electrons in the presence of ULF power and MeV microbursts: Evidence for dual ULF and VLF acceleration
Abstract: We examine signatures of two types of waves that may be involved in the acceleration of energetic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belts. We have compiled a database of ULF wave power from SAMNET and IMAGE ground magnetometer stations for 1987–2001. Long-duration, comprehensive, in situ VLF/ELF chorus wave observations are not available, so we infer chorus wave activity from low-altitude SAMPEX observations of MeV electron microbursts for 1996–2001 since microbursts are thought to be caused by interactions between chorus and trapped electrons. We compare the ULF and microburst observations to in situ trapped electrons observed by high-altitude satellites from 1989–2001. We find that electron acceleration at low L shells is closely associated with both ULF activity and MeV microbu. . .
Date: 08/2003 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2002JA009784 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JA009784/abstract
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Authors: Reeves Geoffrey D, Friedel Reiner H W, Larsen Brian A., Skoug Ruth M., Funsten Herbert O., et al.
Title: Energy dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions.
Abstract: We present observations of the radiation belts from the HOPE and MagEIS particle detectors on the Van Allen Probes satellites that illustrate the energy-dependence and L-shell dependence of radiation belt enhancements and decays. We survey events in 2013 and analyze an event on March 1 in more detail. The observations show: (a) At all L-shells, lower-energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies; (b) Events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies; (c) Enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are more common at lower energies; and (d) Even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower-energies tend to extend to lower L-shells than higher energies. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L-shells at lower energie. . .
Date: 12/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021569 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021569http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021569
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Authors: Li Haimeng, Yuan Zhigang, Yu Xiongdong, Huang Shiyong, Wang Dedong, et al.
Title: The enhancement of cosmic radio noise absorption due to hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation during substorms
Abstract: The Van-Allen probes, low-altitude NOAA satellite, MetOp satellite and riometer are used to analyze variations of precipitating energetic electron fluxes and cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA) driven by plasmaspheric hiss with respect to geomagnetic activities. The hiss-driven energetic electron precipitations (at L~4.7-5.3, MLT~8-9) are observed during geomagnetic quiet condition and substorms, respectively. We find that the CNA detected by riometers increased very little in the hiss-driven event during quiet condition on September 06, 2012. The hiss-driven enhancement of riometer was still little during the first substorm on September 30, 2012. However, the absorption detected by the riometer largely increased while the energies of the injected electrons became higher during the second . . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021113 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021113
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Authors: Min Kyungguk, Boardsen Scott A., Denton Richard E, and Liu Kaijun
Title: Equatorial Evolution of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode in the Source Region: Observation-Simulation Comparison of the Preferential Propagation Direction
Abstract: Recent analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probes in the source region outside the plasmapause has shown that fast magnetosonic waves (also referred to as equatorial noise) propagate preferentially in the azimuthal direction, implying that wave amplification should occur during azimuthal propagation. To demonstrate this, we carry out 2‐D particle‐in‐cell simulations of the fast magnetosonic mode at the dipole magnetic equator with the simulation box size, the magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the plasma parameters chosen from the same event recently analyzed. The self‐consistently evolving electric and magnetic field fluctuations are characterized by spectral peaks at harmonics of the local proton cyclotron frequency. The azimuthal component of the electric field fluctua. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026037 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026037
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Authors: Lyons Lawrence R, and Thorne Richard Mansergh
Title: Equilibrium Structure of Radiation Belt Electrons
Abstract: The detailed quiet time structure of energetic electrons in the earth's radiation belts is explained on the basis of a balance between pitch angle scattering loss and inward radial diffusion from an average outer zone source. Losses are attributed to a combination of classical Coulomb scattering at low L and whistler mode turbulent pitch angle diffusion throughout the outer plasmasphere. Radial diffusion is driven by substorm associated fluctuations of the magnetospheric convection electric field.
Date: 05/1973 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research Pages: 2142 - 2149 DOI: 10.1029/JA078i013p02142 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JA078i013p02142/abstract
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Authors: Juhász Lilla, Omura Yoshiharu, Lichtenberger János, and Friedel Reinhard H.
Title: Evaluation of Plasma Properties From Chorus Waves Observed at the Generation Region
Abstract: In this study we present an inversion method which provides thermal plasma population parameters from characteristics of chorus emissions only. Our ultimate goal is to apply this method to ground‐based data in order to derive the lower‐energy boundary condition for many radiation belt models. The first step is to test the chorus inversion method on in situ data of the Van Allen Probes in the generation region. The density and thermal velocity of energetic electrons (few kiloelectron volts to 100 keV) are derived from frequency sweep rate and starting frequencies of chorus emissions through analysis of wave data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science on board the Van Allen Probes. The nonlinear wave growth theory of Omura and Nunn (2011, https://doi. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026337 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026337
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Authors: Zhu Hui, Shprits Yuri Y, Chen Lunjin, Liu Xu, and Kellerman Adam C.
Title: An event on simultaneous amplification of exohiss and chorus waves associated with electron density enhancements
Abstract: Whistler mode exohiss are the structureless hiss waves observed outside the plasmapause with featured equatorward Poynting flux. An event of the amplification of exohiss as well as chorus waves was recorded by Van Allen Probes during the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm. Amplitudes of both types of the waves showed a significant increase at the regions of electron density enhancements. It is found that the electrons resonant with exohiss and chorus showed moderate pitch‐angle anisotropies. The ratio of the number of electrons resonating with exohiss to total electron number presented in‐phase correlation with density variations, which suggests that exohiss can be amplified due to electron density enhancement in terms of cyclotron instability. The calculation of linear growth . . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA025023 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA025023
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Authors: Li W, Mourenas D., Artemyev A., Agapitov O., Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Evidence of stronger pitch angle scattering loss caused by oblique whistler-mode waves as compared with quasi-parallel waves
Abstract: Wave normal distributions of lower-band whistler-mode waves observed outside the plasmapause exhibit two peaks; one near the parallel direction and the other at very oblique angles. We analyze a number of conjunction events between the Van Allen Probes near the equatorial plane and POES satellites at conjugate low altitudes, where lower-band whistler-mode wave amplitudes were inferred from the two-directional POES electron measurements over 30–100 keV, assuming that these waves were quasi-parallel. For conjunction events, the wave amplitudes inferred from the POES electron measurements were found to be overestimated as compared with the Van Allen Probes measurements primarily for oblique waves and quasi-parallel waves with small wave amplitudes (< ~20 pT) measured at low latitudes. This . . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061260 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL061260
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Authors: Thorne R M, Li W, Ni B, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Evolution and slow decay of an unusual narrow ring of relativistic electrons near L ~ 3.2 following the September 2012 magnetic storm
Abstract: A quantitative analysis is performed on the decay of an unusual ring of relativistic electrons between 3 and 3.5 RE, which was observed by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instrument on the Van Allen probes. The ring formed on 3 September 2012 during the main phase of a magnetic storm due to the partial depletion of the outer radiation belt for L > 3.5, and this remnant belt of relativistic electrons persisted at energies above 2 MeV, exhibiting only slow decay, until it was finally destroyed during another magnetic storm on 1 October. This long-term stability of the relativistic electron ring was associated with the rapid outward migration and maintenance of the plasmapause to distances greater than L = 4. The remnant ring was thus immune from the dynamic process, whic. . .
Date: 06/2013 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/grl.50627 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50627/full
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Authors: Zhou Qinghua, Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Liu Si, He Yihua, et al.
Title: Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ∼300–1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10−5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhi. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 4518 - 4529 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022366 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022366
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Authors: Nishimura Y., Bortnik J, Li W, Lyons L R, Donovan E. F., et al.
Title: Evolution of nightside subauroral proton aurora caused by transient plasma sheet flows
Abstract: While nightside subauroral proton aurora shows rapid temporal variations, the cause of this variability has rarely been investigated. Using well-coordinated observations by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imagers, THEMIS satellites in the equatorial magnetosphere, and the low-altitude NOAA 17 satellite, we examined the rapid temporal evolution of subauroral proton aurora in the premidnight sector. An isolated proton aurora occurred soon after an auroral poleward boundary intensification that was followed by an auroral streamer reaching the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval. Three THEMIS satellites in the magnetotail detected flow bursts and one of the THEMIS satellites in the outer plasmasphere observed a ring current injectio. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5295 - 5304 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020029
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Authors: Nishimura Y., Bortnik J, Li W, Lyons L R, Donovan E. F., et al.
Title: Evolution of nightside subauroral proton aurora caused by transient plasma sheet flows
Abstract: While nightside subauroral proton aurora shows rapid temporal variations, the cause of this variability has rarely been investigated. Using well-coordinated observations by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imagers, THEMIS satellites in the equatorial magnetosphere, and the low-altitude NOAA 17 satellite, we examined the rapid temporal evolution of subauroral proton aurora in the premidnight sector. An isolated proton aurora occurred soon after an auroral poleward boundary intensification that was followed by an auroral streamer reaching the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval. Three THEMIS satellites in the magnetotail detected flow bursts and one of the THEMIS satellites in the outer plasmasphere observed a ring current injectio. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5295 - 5304 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020029 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020029
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Authors: Jaynes A. N., Li X, Schiller Q. G., Blum L. W., Tu W., et al.
Title: Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during an extended quiescent period
Abstract: To effectively study steady loss due to hiss-driven precipitation of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt, it is useful to isolate this loss by studying a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a case of initial enhancement and slow, steady decay of 700 keV - 2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ~15 December 2012 - 13 January 2013. We incorporate particle measurements from a constellation of satellites, including the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft, and THEMIS, to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. Additional data from calculated phase space density (PSD), as well as hiss and chorus w. . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020125 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020125
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Authors: Zhao H., Li X, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: The evolution of ring current ion energy density and energy content during geomagnetic storms based on Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: Enabled by the comprehensive measurements from the MagEIS, HOPE, and RBSPICE instruments onboard Van Allen Probes in the heart of the radiation belt, the relative contributions of ions with different energies and species to the ring current energy density and their dependence on the phases of geomagnetic storms are quantified. The results show that lower energy (<50 keV) protons enhance much more often and also decay much faster than higher energy protons. During the storm main phase, ions with energies < 50 keV contribute more significantly to the ring current than those with higher energies; while the higher energy protons dominate during the recovery phase and quiet times. The enhancements of higher energy proton fluxes as well as energy content generally occur later than those of lower. . .
Date: 08/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021533 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021533
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Authors: Zhao H., Li X, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: The evolution of ring current ion energy density and energy content during geomagnetic storms based on Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: Enabled by the comprehensive measurements from the MagEIS, HOPE, and RBSPICE instruments onboard Van Allen Probes in the heart of the radiation belt, the relative contributions of ions with different energies and species to the ring current energy density and their dependence on the phases of geomagnetic storms are quantified. The results show that lower energy (<50 keV) protons enhance much more often and also decay much faster than higher energy protons. During the storm main phase, ions with energies < 50 keV contribute more significantly to the ring current than those with higher energies; while the higher energy protons dominate during the recovery phase and quiet times. The enhancements of higher energy proton fluxes as well as energy content generally occur later than those of lower. . .
Date: 08/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021533 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021533
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Authors: Zhao H., Li X, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: The evolution of ring current ion energy density and energy content during geomagnetic storms based on Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: Enabled by the comprehensive measurements from the MagEIS, HOPE, and RBSPICE instruments onboard Van Allen Probes in the heart of the radiation belt, the relative contributions of ions with different energies and species to the ring current energy density and their dependence on the phases of geomagnetic storms are quantified. The results show that lower energy (<50 keV) protons enhance much more often and also decay much faster than higher energy protons. During the storm main phase, ions with energies < 50 keV contribute more significantly to the ring current than those with higher energies; while the higher energy protons dominate during the recovery phase and quiet times. The enhancements of higher energy proton fluxes as well as energy content generally occur later than those of lower. . .
Date: 08/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021533 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021533
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Authors: Denton M. H., Thomsen M F, Reeves G D, Larsen B A, Henderson M G, et al.
Title: The Evolution of the Plasma Sheet Ion Composition: Storms and Recoveries
Abstract: The ion plasma sheet (~few hundred eV to ~few 10s keV) is usually dominated by H+ ions. Here, changes in ion composition within the plasma sheet are explored both during individual events, and statistically during 54 calm-to-storm events and during 21 active-to-calm events. Ion composition data from the HOPE (Helium, Oxygen, Proton, Electron) instruments onboard Van Allen Probes satellites provide exceptional spatial and temporal resolution of the H+, O+, and He+ ion fluxes in the plasma sheet. H+ shown to be the dominant ion in the plasma sheet in the calm-to-storm transition. However, the energy-flux of each ion changes in a quasi-linear manner during extended calm intervals. Heavy ions (O+ and He+) become increasingly important during such periods as charge-exchange reactions result in . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024475 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024475/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Lee J. H., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Examining coherency scales, substructure, and propagation of whistler-mode chorus elements with Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)
Abstract: Whistler-mode chorus waves are a naturally occurring electromagnetic emission observed in Earth's magnetosphere. Here, for the first time, data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission were used to analyze chorus waves in detail, including the calculation of chorus wave normal vectors, k. A case study was examined from a period of substorm activity around the time of a conjunction between the MMS constellation and NASA's Van Allen Probes mission on 07 April 2016. Chorus wave activity was simultaneously observed by all six spacecraft over a broad range of L-shells (5.5 < L < 8.5), magnetic local time (06:00 < MLT < 09:00), and magnetic latitude (-32° < MLat < -15°), implying a large chorus active region. Eight chorus elements and their substructure were analyzed in detail with . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024474 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024474/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Lee J. H., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Examining coherency scales, substructure, and propagation of whistler-mode chorus elements with Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)
Abstract: Whistler-mode chorus waves are a naturally occurring electromagnetic emission observed in Earth's magnetosphere. Here, for the first time, data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission were used to analyze chorus waves in detail, including the calculation of chorus wave normal vectors, k. A case study was examined from a period of substorm activity around the time of a conjunction between the MMS constellation and NASA's Van Allen Probes mission on 07 April 2016. Chorus wave activity was simultaneously observed by all six spacecraft over a broad range of L-shells (5.5 < L < 8.5), magnetic local time (06:00 < MLT < 09:00), and magnetic latitude (-32° < MLat < -15°), implying a large chorus active region. Eight chorus elements and their substructure were analyzed in detail with . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024474 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024474/full
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Authors: Turner D. L., Lee J. H., Claudepierre S G, Fennell J. F., Blake J B, et al.
Title: Examining coherency scales, substructure, and propagation of whistler-mode chorus elements with Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)
Abstract: Whistler-mode chorus waves are a naturally occurring electromagnetic emission observed in Earth's magnetosphere. Here, for the first time, data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission were used to analyze chorus waves in detail, including the calculation of chorus wave normal vectors, k. A case study was examined from a period of substorm activity around the time of a conjunction between the MMS constellation and NASA's Van Allen Probes mission on 07 April 2016. Chorus wave activity was simultaneously observed by all six spacecraft over a broad range of L-shells (5.5 < L < 8.5), magnetic local time (06:00 < MLT < 09:00), and magnetic latitude (-32° < MLat < -15°), implying a large chorus active region. Eight chorus elements and their substructure were analyzed in detail with . . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024474 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024474/full
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Authors: Zhang J.-C., Saikin A. A., Kistler L. M., Smith C W, Spence H E, et al.
Title: Excitation of EMIC waves detected by the Van Allen Probes on 28 April 2013
Abstract: We report the wave observations, associated plasma measurements, and linear theory testing of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave events observed by the Van Allen Probes on 28 April 2013. The wave events are detected in their generation regions as three individual events in two consecutive orbits of Van Allen Probe-A, while the other spacecraft, B, does not detect any significant EMIC wave activity during this period. Three overlapping H+ populations are observed around the plasmapause when the waves are excited. The difference between the observational EMIC wave growth parameter (Σh) and the theoretical EMIC instability parameter (Sh) is significantly raised, on average, to 0.10 ± 0.01, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.07 ± 0.02 during the three wave events, respectively. On Van A. . .
Date: 06/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 4101–4108 DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060621 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL060621
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Authors: Zhou Qinghua, Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Liu Si, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Excitation of nightside magnetosonic waves observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: During the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storm on 30-31 March 2013, Van Allen Probe A detected enhanced magnetosonic (MS) waves in a broad range of L =1.8-4.7 and MLT =17-22 h, with a frequency range ~10-100 Hz. In the meanwhile, distinct proton ring distributions with peaks at energies of ~10 keV, were also observed in L =3.2-4.6 and L =5.0-5.6. Using a subtracted bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed proton ring distribution, we perform three dimensional ray tracing to investigate the instability, propagation and spatial distribution of MS waves. Numerical results show that nightside MS waves are produced by proton ring distribution and grow rapidly from the source location L =5.6 to the location L =5.0, but remain nearly stable at locations L <5.0 Moreover, waves launched. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020481 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020481
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Zhou Qinghua, Su Zhenpeng, He Zhaoguo, Yang Chang, et al.
Title: Explaining occurrences of auroral kilometric radiation in Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is a strong terrestrial radio emission and dominates at higher latitudes because of reflection in vicinities of the source cavity and plasmapause. Recently, Van Allen Probes have observed occurrences of AKR emission in the equatorial region of Earth's radiation belts but its origin still remains an open question. Equatorial AKR can produce efficient acceleration of radiation belt electrons and is a risk to space weather. Here we report high-resolution observations during two small storm periods 4–6 April and 18–20 May 2013 and show, using a 3-D ray tracing simulation, that AKR can propagate downward all the way into the equatorial plane in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions. The simulated results can successfully explain the observed AKR. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 11,971 - 11,978 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071728 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071728/full
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Authors: Baker D N, Kanekal S G, Li X, Monk S P, Goldstein J, et al.
Title: An extreme distortion of the Van Allen belt arising from the ‘Hallowe’en’ solar storm in 2003
Abstract: The Earth's radiation belts—also known as the Van Allen belts1—contain high-energy electrons trapped on magnetic field lines2, 3. The centre of the outer belt is usually 20,000–25,000 km from Earth. The region between the belts is normally devoid of particles2, 3, 4, and is accordingly favoured as a location for spacecraft operation because of the benign environment5. Here we report that the outer Van Allen belt was compressed dramatically by a solar storm known as the ‘Hallowe'en storm’ of 2003. From 1 to 10 November, the outer belt had its centre only ~10,000 km from Earth's equatorial surface, and the plasmasphere was similarly displaced inwards. The region between the belts became the location of high particle radiation intensity. This remarkable deformation of the entire. . .
Date: 12/2004 Publisher: Nature Pages: 878 - 881 DOI: 10.1038/nature03116 Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7019/full/nature03116.html
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Authors: Lugaz N., Farrugia C. J., Huang C.-L., and Spence H E
Title: Extreme geomagnetic disturbances due to shocks within CMEs
Abstract: We report on features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling elicited by shocks propagating through coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by analyzing the intense geomagnetic storm of 6 August 1998. During this event, the dynamic pressure enhancement at the shock combined with a simultaneous increase in the southward component of the magnetic field resulted in a large earthward retreat of Earth's magnetopause, which remained close to geosynchronous orbit for more than 4 h. This occurred despite the fact that both shock and CME were weak and relatively slow. Another similar example of a weak shock inside a slow CME resulting in an intense geomagnetic storm is the 30 September 2012 event, which strongly depleted the outer radiation belt. We discuss the potential of shocks inside CMEs to cause large . . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064530 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064530
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Authors: Chaston C. C., Bonnell J. W., Wygant J R, Kletzing C A, Reeves G D, et al.
Title: Extreme ionospheric ion energization and electron heating in Alfvén waves in the storm-time inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We report measurements of energized outflowing/bouncing ionospheric ions and heated electrons in the inner magnetosphere during a geomagnetic storm. The ions arrive in the equatorial plane with pitch angles that increase with energy over a range from tens of eV to > 50 keV while the electrons are field-aligned up to ~1 keV. These particle distributions are observed during intervals of broadband low frequency electromagnetic field fluctuations consistent with a Doppler-shifted spectrum of kinetic Alfvén waves and kinetic field-line resonances. The fluctuations extend from L≈3 out to the apogee of the Van Allen Probes spacecraft at L≈6.5. They thereby span most of the L-shell range occupied by the ring current. These measurements suggest a model for ionospheric ion outflow and energizat. . .
Date: 12/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL066674 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL066674http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015GL066674
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Authors: Jaynes A. N., Ali A. F., Elkington S R, Malaspina D. M., Baker D N, et al.
Title: Fast diffusion of ultra-relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt: 17 March 2015 storm event
Abstract: Inward radial diffusion driven by ULF waves has long been known to be capable of accelerating radiation belt electrons to very high energies within the heart of the belts, but more recent work has shown that radial diffusion values can be highly event‐specific and mean values or empirical models may not capture the full significance of radial diffusion to acceleration events. Here we present an event of fast inward radial diffusion, occurring during a period following the geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. Ultra‐relativistic electrons up to ∼8 MeV are accelerated in the absence of intense higher‐frequency plasma waves, indicating an acceleration event in the core of the outer belt driven primarily or entirely by ULF wave‐driven diffusion. We examine this fast diffusion rate alon. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL079786 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL079786
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Authors: Min Kyungguk, Liu Kaijun, Wang Xueyi, Chen Lunjin, and Denton Richard E
Title: Fast Magnetosonic Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes: Testing Local Wave Excitation Mechanism
Abstract: Linear Vlasov theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for electromagnetic fluctuations in a homogeneous, magnetized, and collisionless plasma are used to investigate a fast magnetosonic wave event observed by the Van Allen Probes. The fluctuating magnetic field observed exhibits a series of spectral peaks at harmonics of the proton cyclotron frequency Ωp and has a dominant compressional component, which can be classified as fast magnetosonic waves. Furthermore, the simultaneously observed proton phase space density exhibits positive slopes in the perpendicular velocity space, ∂fp/∂v⊥>0, which can be a source for these waves. Linear theory analyses and PIC simulations use plasma and field parameters measured in situ except that the modeled proton distribution is modified to hav. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024867 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024867/full
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Authors: Li W, Chen L, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Angelopoulos V, et al.
Title: First Evidence for Chorus at a Large Geocentric Distance as a Source of Plasmaspheric Hiss: Coordinated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Observation
Abstract: Recent ray tracing suggests that plasmaspheric hiss can originate from chorus observed outside of the plasmapause. Although a few individual events have been reported to support this mechanism, the number of reported conjugate events is still very limited. Using coordinated observations between THEMIS and Van Allen Probes, we report on an interesting event, where chorus was observed at a large L-shell (~9.8), different from previously reported events at L < 6, but still exhibited a remarkable correlation with hiss observed in the outer plasmasphere (L ~ 5.5). Ray tracing indicates that a subset of chorus can propagate into the observed location of hiss on a timescale of ~ 5-6 s, in excellent agreement with the observed time lag between chorus and hiss. This provides quantitative support th. . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062832 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062832
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Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
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Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
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Authors: Motoba T., Ohtani S, Anderson B J, Korth H., Mitchell D., et al.
Title: On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations
Abstract: Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1. . .
Date: 10/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 8707 - 8722 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.v120.1010.1002/2015JA021676 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.v120.10http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021676http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021676
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Ni Binbin, Ma Qianli, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, et al.
Title: Formation of Energetic Electron Butterfly Distributions by Magnetosonic Waves via Landau Resonance
Abstract: Radiation belt electrons can exhibit different types of pitch angle distributions in response to various magnetospheric processes. Butterfly distributions, characterized by flux minima at pitch angles around 90°, are broadly observed in both the outer and inner belts and the slot region. Butterfly distributions close to the outer magnetospheric boundary have been attributed to drift shell splitting and losses to the magnetopause. However, their occurrence in the inner belt and the slot region has hitherto not been resolved. By analyzing the particle and wave data collected by the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm, we combine test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck simulations to reveal that scattering by equatorial magnetosonic waves is a significant cause for the formation. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL067853 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL067853http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL067853
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Authors: Li Jinxing, Ni Binbin, Ma Qianli, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, et al.
Title: Formation of Energetic Electron Butterfly Distributions by Magnetosonic Waves via Landau Resonance
Abstract: Radiation belt electrons can exhibit different types of pitch angle distributions in response to various magnetospheric processes. Butterfly distributions, characterized by flux minima at pitch angles around 90°, are broadly observed in both the outer and inner belts and the slot region. Butterfly distributions close to the outer magnetospheric boundary have been attributed to drift shell splitting and losses to the magnetopause. However, their occurrence in the inner belt and the slot region has hitherto not been resolved. By analyzing the particle and wave data collected by the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm, we combine test particle calculations and Fokker-Planck simulations to reveal that scattering by equatorial magnetosonic waves is a significant cause for the formation. . .
Date: 04/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL067853 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL067853http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL067853
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Authors: Nosé M., Oimatsu S., Keika K, Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, et al.
Title: Formation of the oxygen torus in the inner magnetosphere: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: We study the formation process of an oxygen torus during the 12–15 November 2012 magnetic storm, using the magnetic field and plasma wave data obtained by Van Allen Probes. We estimate the local plasma mass density (ρL) and the local electron number density (neL) from the resonant frequencies of standing Alfvén waves and the upper hybrid resonance band. The average ion mass (M) can be calculated by M ∼ ρL/neL under the assumption of quasi-neutrality of plasma. During the storm recovery phase, both Probe A and Probe B observe the oxygen torus at L = 3.0–4.0 and L = 3.7–4.5, respectively, on the morning side. The oxygen torus has M = 4.5–8 amu and extends around the plasmapause that is identified at L∼3.2–3.9. We find that during the initial phase, M is 4–7 amu throughout . . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020593 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020593
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Authors: Lessard Marc R., Paulson Kristoff, Spence Harlan E., Weaver Carol, Engebretson Mark J, et al.
Title: Generation of EMIC Waves and Effects on Particle Precipitation During a Solar Wind Pressure Intensification with B z >
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms, some fraction of the solar wind energy is coupled via reconnection at the dayside magnetopause, a process that requires a southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Through a complex sequence of events, some of this energy ultimately drives the generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which can then scatter energetic electrons and ions from the radiation belts. In the event described in this paper, the interplanetary magnetic field remained northward throughout the event, a condition unfavorable for solar wind energy coupling through low‐latitude reconnection. While this resulted in SYM/H remaining positive throughout the event (so this may not be considered a storm, in spite of the very high solar wind densities), pressure fluctuations were d. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026477 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026477
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Liu Si, Tao Xin, Su Zhenpeng, Zhou Qinghua, et al.
Title: Generation of extremely low frequency chorus in Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Recent studies have shown that chorus can efficiently accelerate the outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. Chorus, previously often observed above 0.1 equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce, was generated by energetic electrons originating from Earth's plasma sheet. Chorus below 0.1 fce has seldom been reported until the recent data from Van Allen Probes, but its origin has not been revealed so far. Because electron resonant energy can approach the relativistic level at extremely low frequency, relativistic effects should be considered in the formula for whistler mode wave growth rate. Here we report high-resolution observations during the 14 October 2014 small storm and firstly demonstrate, using a fully relativistic simulation, that electrons with the high-energy tail p. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023561 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023561
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Authors: Zhou Qinghua, Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Liu Si, He Yihua, et al.
Title: Generation of lower and upper bands of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in the Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves generated by the electron loss cone distribution can produce efficient scattering loss of plasma sheet electrons, which has a significant effect on the dynamics in the outer magnetosphere. Here we report two ECH emission events around the same location L≈ 5.7–5.8, MLT ≈ 12 from Van Allen Probes on 11 February (event A) and 9 January 2014 (event B), respectively. The spectrum of ECH waves was centered at the lower half of the harmonic bands during event A, but the upper half during event B. The observed electron phase space density in both events is fitted by the subtracted bi-Maxwellian distribution, and the fitting functions are used to evaluate the local growth rates of ECH waves based on a linear theory for homogeneous plasmas.. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073051 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073051/full
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Authors: He Yihua, Xiao Fuliang, Su Zhenpeng, Zheng Huinan, Yang Chang, et al.
Title: Generation of lower L -shell dayside chorus by energetic electrons from the plasmasheet
Abstract: Currently, the generation mechanism for the lower L‐shell dayside chorus has still remained an open question. Here, we report two storm events: 06‐07 March 2016 and 20‐21 January 2016, when Van Allen Probes observed enhanced dayside chorus with lower and higher wave normal angles (the angles between the wave vector and the geomagnetic field) in the region of L = 3.5‐6.3 and MLT = 5.6‐13.5. Hot and energetic (∼ 1‐100 keV) electrons displayed enhancements in fluxes and anisotropy when they were injected from the plasmasheet and drifted from midnight through dawn toward the dayside. Calculations of chorus local growth rates under different waves normal angles show that the upper cutoff and peak wave frequencies display similar patterns to the observations. Chorus growth rates ma. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA024889 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA024889
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Authors: Chen Lunjin, Thorne Richard M, Bortnik Jacob, Li Wen, Horne Richard B, et al.
Title: Generation of Unusually Low Frequency Plasmaspheric Hiss
Abstract: It has been reported from Van Allen Probe observations that plasmaspheric hiss intensification in the outer plasmasphere, associated with a substorm injection on Sept 30 2012, occurred with a peak frequency near 100 Hz, well below the typical plasmaspheric hiss frequency range, extending down to ~20 Hz. We examine this event of unusually low frequency plasmaspheric hiss to understand its generation mechanism. Quantitative analysis is performed by simulating wave ray paths via the HOTRAY ray tracing code with measured plasma density and calculating ray path-integrated wave gain evaluated using the measured energetic electron distribution. We demonstrate that the growth rate due to substorm injected electrons is positive but rather weak, leading to small wave gain (~10 dB) during a sin. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060628 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL060628
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Authors: Hwang K.-J., Sibeck D G, Fok M.-C. H., Zheng Y., Nishimura Y., et al.
Title: The global context of the 14 November, 2012 storm event
Abstract: From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November, 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to. . .
Date: 02/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020826 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020826
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Authors: Min Kyungguk, Lee Jeongwoo, Keika Kunihiro, and Li W
Title: Global distribution of EMIC waves derived from THEMIS observations
Abstract: [1] Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in magnetospheric dynamics and their global distribution has been of great interest. This paper presents the distribution of EMIC waves over a broader range than ever before, as enabled by observations with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft from 2007 to 2010. Our major findings are: (1) There are two major peaks in the EMIC wave occurrence probability. One is at dusk and 8–12 RE where the helium band dominates the hydrogen band waves. The other is at dawn and 10–12 RE where the hydrogen band dominates the helium band waves. (2) In terms of wave spectral power the dusk events are stronger (≈10 nT2/Hz) than the dawn events (≈3 nT2/Hz). (3) The dawn . . .
Date: 05/2012 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2012JA017515
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Authors: Min Kyungguk, Lee Jeongwoo, Keika Kunihiro, and Li W
Title: Global distribution of EMIC waves derived from THEMIS observations
Abstract: [1] Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in magnetospheric dynamics and their global distribution has been of great interest. This paper presents the distribution of EMIC waves over a broader range than ever before, as enabled by observations with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft from 2007 to 2010. Our major findings are: (1) There are two major peaks in the EMIC wave occurrence probability. One is at dusk and 8–12 RE where the helium band dominates the hydrogen band waves. The other is at dawn and 10–12 RE where the hydrogen band dominates the helium band waves. (2) In terms of wave spectral power the dusk events are stronger (≈10 nT2/Hz) than the dawn events (≈3 nT2/Hz). (3) The dawn . . .
Date: 05/2012 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2012JA017515
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Authors: Kress B T, Hudson M K, Looper M D, Albert J, Lyon J G, et al.
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement
Abstract: [1] Prior to 2003, there are two known cases where ultrarelativistic (≳10 MeV) electrons appeared in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts in association with high speed interplanetary shocks: the 24 March 1991 and the less well studied 21 February 1994 storms. During the March 1991 event electrons were injected well into the inner zone on a timescale of minutes, producing a new stably trapped radiation belt population that persisted for ∼10 years. More recently, at the end of solar cycle 23, a number of violent geomagnetic disturbances resulted in large variations in ultrarelativistic electrons in the inner zone, indicating that these events are less rare than previously thought. Here we present results from a numerical study of shock-induced transport and energization of outer zone . . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012218 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012218/abstract
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Authors: Kress B T, Hudson M K, Looper M D, Albert J, Lyon J G, et al.
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement
Abstract: [1] Prior to 2003, there are two known cases where ultrarelativistic (≳10 MeV) electrons appeared in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts in association with high speed interplanetary shocks: the 24 March 1991 and the less well studied 21 February 1994 storms. During the March 1991 event electrons were injected well into the inner zone on a timescale of minutes, producing a new stably trapped radiation belt population that persisted for ∼10 years. More recently, at the end of solar cycle 23, a number of violent geomagnetic disturbances resulted in large variations in ultrarelativistic electrons in the inner zone, indicating that these events are less rare than previously thought. Here we present results from a numerical study of shock-induced transport and energization of outer zone . . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012218 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012218/abstract
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Authors: KRESS B, Hudson M K, LOOPER M, LYON J, and GOODRICH C
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of solar energetic electron trapping in the Earth’s radiation belts
Abstract: Test-particle trajectories are computed in fields from a global MHD magnetospheric model simulation of the 29 October 2003 Storm Commencement to investigate trapping and transport of solar energetic electrons (SEEs) in the magnetosphere during severe storms. SEEs are found to provide a source population for a newly formed belt of View the MathML source electrons in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts, which was observed following the 29 October 2003 storm. Energy and pitch angle distributions of the new belt are compared with results previously obtained [Kress, B.T., Hudson, M.K., Looper, M.D., Albert, J., Lyon, J.G., Goodrich, C.C., 2007. Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, A0921. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1727 - 1737 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.05.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001338
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Authors: KRESS B, Hudson M K, LOOPER M, LYON J, and GOODRICH C
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of solar energetic electron trapping in the Earth’s radiation belts
Abstract: Test-particle trajectories are computed in fields from a global MHD magnetospheric model simulation of the 29 October 2003 Storm Commencement to investigate trapping and transport of solar energetic electrons (SEEs) in the magnetosphere during severe storms. SEEs are found to provide a source population for a newly formed belt of View the MathML source electrons in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts, which was observed following the 29 October 2003 storm. Energy and pitch angle distributions of the new belt are compared with results previously obtained [Kress, B.T., Hudson, M.K., Looper, M.D., Albert, J., Lyon, J.G., Goodrich, C.C., 2007. Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, A0921. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1727 - 1737 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.05.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001338
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Authors: Meredith Nigel P, Horne Richard B, Kersten Tobias, Li Wen, Bortnik Jacob, et al.
Title: Global model of plasmaspheric hiss from multiple satellite observations
Abstract: We present a global model of plasmaspheric hiss, using data from eight satellites, extending the coverage and improving the statistics of existing models. We use geomagnetic activity dependent templates to separate plasmaspheric hiss from chorus. In the region 22‐14 MLT the boundary between plasmaspheric hiss and chorus moves to lower L∗ values with increasing geomagnetic activity. The average wave intensity of plasmaspheric hiss is largest on the dayside and increases with increasing geomagnetic activity from midnight through dawn to dusk. Plasmaspheric hiss is most intense and spatially extended in the 200‐500 Hz frequency band during active conditions, 400 Date: 05/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025226 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2018JA025226http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1029/2018JA025226/fullpdfhttps://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1029%2F2018JA025226
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Authors: Le G., Chi P. J., Strangeway R J, Russell C. T., Slavin J. A., et al.
Title: Global observations of magnetospheric high- m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm
Abstract: We report global observations of high-m poloidal waves during the recovery phase of the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm from a constellation of widely spaced satellites of five missions including Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS), Cluster, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The combined observations demonstrate the global spatial extent of storm time poloidal waves. MMS observations confirm high azimuthal wave numbers (m ~ 100). Mode identification indicates the waves are associated with the second harmonic of field line resonances. The wave frequencies exhibit a decreasing trend as L increases, distinguishing them from the single-frequency global poloidal modes normally obs. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073048 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073048/full
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