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2015
Authors: Allen R. C., Zhang J. -C., Kistler L. M., Spence H E, Lin R. -L., et al.
Title: A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster: 1. Wave properties
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, as well as local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the MLT-L frame within a limited MLAT range. In this study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using ten years (2001–2010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 minutes of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021333 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021333
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Authors: Engebretson M. J., Posch J. L., Wygant J R, Kletzing C A, Lessard M. R., et al.
Title: Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 hours in MLT
Abstract: Although most studies of the effects of EMIC waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on February 23, 2014 that extended over 8 hours in UT and over 12 hours in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. W. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021227 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021227
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Authors: Moya Pablo. S., Pinto Víctor A., Viñas Adolfo F., Sibeck David G., Kurth William S., et al.
Title: Weak Kinetic Alfvén Waves Turbulence during the November 14th 2012 geomagnetic storm: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: n the dawn sector, L~ 5.5 and MLT~4-7, from 01:30 to 06:00 UT during the November 14th 2012 geomagnetic storm, both Van Allen Probes observed an alternating sequence of locally quiet and disturbed intervals with two strikingly different power fluctuation levels and magnetic field orientations: either small (~10−2 nT2) total power with strong GSM Bx and weak By, or large (~10 nT2) total power with weak Bx, and strong By and Bz components. During both kinds of intervals the fluctuations occur in the vicinity of the local ion gyro-frequencies (0.01-10 Hz) in the spacecraft frame, propagate oblique to the magnetic field, (θ ~ 60°) and have magnetic compressibility C = |δB|||/|δB⊥| ∼ 1, where δB|| (δB⊥) are the average amplitudes of the fluctuations parallel (perpendicular) to the. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020281 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020281
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Authors: Artemyev A.V., Liu J., Angelopoulos V, and Runov A.
Title: Acceleration of ions by electric field pulses in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Intense (~5-15 mV/m), short-lived (≤1 min) electric field pulses have been observed to accompany earthward-propagating, dipolarizing flux bundles (DFB; flux tubes with a strong magnetic field) before they are stopped by the strong dipole field. Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) observations and test particle modeling, we investigate particle acceleration around L-shell ~7-9 in the nightside magnetosphere and demonstrate that such pulses can effectively accelerate ions with tens of keV initial energy to hundreds of keV. This acceleration occurs because the ion gyroradius is comparable to the spatial scale of the localized electric field pulse at the leading edge of the flux bundle before it stops. The proposed acceleration mechanism can rep. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021160 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021160
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Authors: Lyons L R, Nishimura Y., Gallardo-Lacourt B., Nicolls M. J., Chen S., et al.
Title: Azimuthal flow bursts in the Inner Plasma Sheet and Possible Connection with SAPS and Plasma Sheet Earthward Flow Bursts
Abstract: We have combined radar observations and auroral images obtained during the PFISR Ion Neutral Observations in the Thermosphere campaign to show the common occurrence of westward moving, localized auroral brightenings near the auroral equatorward boundary and to show their association with azimuthally moving flow bursts near or within the SAPS region. These results indicate that the SAPS region, rather than consisting of relatively stable proton precipitation and westward flows, can have rapidly varying flows, with speeds varying from ~100 m/s to ~1 km/s in just a few minutes. The auroral brightenings are associated with bursts of weak electron precipitation that move westward with the westward flow bursts and extend into the SAPS region. Additionally, our observations show evidence that the. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021023 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021023
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Authors: Artemyev A. V., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F S, and Spence H.
Title: Butterfly pitch-angle distribution of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt: Evidence of nonadiabatic scattering
Abstract: In this paper we investigate the scattering of relativistic electrons in the night-side outer radiation belt (around the geostationary orbit). We consider the particular case of low geomagnetic activity (|Dst|< 20 nT), quiet conditions in the solar wind, and absence of whistler wave emissions. For such conditions we find several events of Van-Allen probe observations of butterfly pitch-angle distributions of relativistic electrons (energies about 1-3 MeV). Many previous publications have described such pitch-angle distributions over a wide energy range as due to the combined effect of outward radial diffusion and magnetopause shadowing. In this paper we discuss another mechanism that produces butterfly distributions over a limited range of electron energies. We suggest that such distributi. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020865 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020865
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Authors: Hwang J., Choi E.-J., Park J.-S., Fok M.-C., Lee D.-Y., et al.
Title: Comprehensive analysis of the flux dropout during 7-8 November 2008 storm using multi-satellites observations and RBE model
Abstract: We investigate an electron flux dropout during a weak storm on 7–8 November 2008, with Dst minimum value being −37 nT. During this period, two clear dropouts were observed on GOES 11 > 2 MeV electrons. We also find a simultaneous dropout in the subrelativistic electrons recorded by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes in the outer radiation belt. Using the Radiation Belt Environment model, we try to reproduce the observed dropout features in both relativistic and subrelativistic electrons. We found that there are local time dependences in the dropout for both observation and simulation in subrelativistic electrons: (1) particle loss begins from nightside and propagates into dayside and (2) resupply starts from near dawn magnetic local time . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021085 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021085
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Authors: Zhang Q. -H., Lockwood M., Foster J. C., Zhang S. -R., Zhang B. -C., et al.
Title: Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions
Abstract: Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches’ evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume (SED) at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary (PCB) due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in-situ THEMIS observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, whilst being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and SuperDARN radars. Changes in convectio. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021172 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021172
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Authors: Malaspina David M., Wygant John R., Ergun Robert E., Reeves Geoff D., Skoug Ruth M., et al.
Title: Electric field structures and waves at plasma boundaries in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Recent observations by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft have demonstrated that a variety of electric field structures and nonlinear waves frequently occur in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere, including phase space holes, kinetic field line resonances, nonlinear whistler mode waves, and several types of double layer. However, it is unclear whether such structures and waves have a significant impact on the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts and ring current. To make progress toward quantifying their importance, this study statistically evaluates the correlation of such structures and waves with plasma boundaries. A strong correlation is found. These statistical results, combined with observations of electric field activity at propagating plasma boundaries, a. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021137 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021137
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Authors: Agapitov O. V., Krasnoselskikh V., Mozer F S, Artemyev A. V., and Volokitin A. S.
Title: Generation of nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the outer radiation belt through the parametric decay of whistler waves
Abstract: Huge numbers of different non-linear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on the Van Allen Probes. Some of them are associated with whistler waves. Such TDS often emerge on the forward edges of the whistler wave packets and form chains. The parametric decay of a whistler wave into a whistler wave propagating in the opposite direction and an electron acoustic wave is studied experimentally as well as analytically, using Van Allen Probes data. The resulting electron acoustic wave is considered to be the source of electron scale TDS. The measured parameters of the three waves (two whistlers and the electron acoustic wave) are in a good agreement with an assumption . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064145 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064145
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Authors: Dixon P., MacDonald E A, Funsten H O, Glocer A., Grande M., et al.
Title: Multipoint observations of the open-closed field line boundary as observed by the Van Allen Probes and geostationary satellites during the November 14 th 2012 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft witnessed a series of lobe encounters between 0200 and 0515 UT on November 14th 2012. Although lobe entry had been observed previously by the other spacecraft, the two Van Allen Probe spacecraft allow us to observe the motion of the boundary for the first time. Moreover, this event is unique in that it consists of a series of six quasi-periodic lobe entries. The events occurred on the dawn flank between 4 and 6.6 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst dropped to less than -100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = −15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Observations by LANL GEO spacecraft at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe encounters in the northern hemisphere and on the dusk flank. The two spacecraf. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020883 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020883
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Authors: Fu Xiangrong, Guo Zehua, Dong Chuanfei, and Gary Peter
Title: Nonlinear subcyclotron resonance as a formationmechanism for gaps in banded chorus
Abstract: An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω≃0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064182 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064182
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Authors: Chi P. J., and Le G.
Title: Observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves by ST-5 satellites in low Earth orbit during geomagnetically quiet times
Abstract: The poloidal waves with large azimuthal wavenumbers (m~100) in the magnetosphere are known to be generated by drift or drift bounce resonance with energetic ring current particles, and these waves may play a role in modulating the energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere. When examining the magnetic field data collected by the NASA ST-5 satellites in the low Earth orbit, Le et al. [2011] discovered many wave events with frequencies of 30–200 mHz (in the Pc 2–3 band), and they proposed that these waves should in fact be Doppler-shifted high-m poloidal waves in the magnetosphere with frequencies at only a few mHz (in the Pc 5 band). Using a new method that examines the differences in wave phase detected by the three ST-5 satellites, we confirm that the frequencies in the Earth fram. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021145 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021145
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Authors: Johnston Wm. Robert, O'Brien Paul, Ginet Gregory P., and the AE9/AP9/SPM team
Title: Release of AE9/AP9/SPM Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Model Version 1.20.002
Abstract: N/A
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2015SW001212 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015SW001212
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Authors: Ghamry E., Kim K.-H., Kwon H.-J., Lee D.-H., Park J.-S., et al.
Title: Simultaneous Pi2 observations by the Van Allen Probes inside and outside the plasmasphere
Abstract: Plasmaspheric virtual resonance (PVR) model has been proposed as one of source mechanisms for low-latitude Pi2 pulsations. Since PVR-associated Pi2 pulsations are not localized inside the plasmasphere, simultaneous multipoint observations inside and outside the plasmasphere require to test the PVR model. Until now, however, there are few studies using simultaneous multisatellite observations inside and outside the plasmasphere for understanding the radial structure of Pi2 pulsation. In this study, we focus on the Pi2 event observed at low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) ground station in South Korea in the postmidnight sector (magnetic local time (MLT) = 3.0) for the interval from 1730 to 1900 UT on 12 March 2013. By using electron density derived from the frequency of the upper hybrid wav. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021095 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021095
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Authors: Wang Dedong, Yuan Zhigang, Yu Xiongdong, Deng Xiaohua, Zhou Meng, et al.
Title: Statistical characteristic of EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations
Abstract: Utilizing the data from the magnetometer instrument which is a part of the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument suite onboard the Van Allen Probe A from Sep. 2012 to Apr. 2014, when the apogee of the satellite has passed all the MLT sectors, we obtain the statistical distribution characteristic of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere over all local times from L=3 to L=6. Compared with the previous statistical results about EMIC waves, the occurrence rates of EMIC waves distribute relatively uniform in the MLT sectors in lower L-shells. On the other hand, in higher L-shells, there are indeed some peaks of the occurrence rate for the EMIC waves, especially in the noon, dusk and night sectors. EMIC waves appear at lower L-shells in the dawn. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021089 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021089
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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their Effects on radiation belt electron dynamics
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak frequencies are generally lower than the commonly adopted value (~550 Hz), which was in frequent use, and that the hiss wave power frequently extends below 100 Hz, particularly at larger L shells (> ~3) on the dayside during enhanced levels of substorm activity. We also compare electron pitch angle scattering rates caused by hiss . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021048 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021048
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Authors: Dai Lei, Takahashi Kazue, Lysak Robert, Wang Chi, Wygant John R., et al.
Title: Storm-time occurrence and Spatial distribution of Pc4 poloidal ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere: A Van Allen Probes Statistical study
Abstract: Poloidal ULF waves are capable of efficiently interacting with energetic particles in the ring current and the radiation belt. Using Van Allen Probes (RBSP) data from October 2012 to July 2014, we investigate the spatial distribution and storm-time occurrence of Pc4 (7-25 mHz) poloidal waves in the inner magnetosphere. Pc4 poloidal waves are sorted into two categories: waves with and without significant magnetic compressional components. Two types of poloidal waves have comparable occurrence rates, both of which are much higher during geomagnetic storms. The non-compressional poloidal waves mostly occur in the late recovery phase associated with an increase of Dst toward 0, suggesting that the decay of the ring current provides their free energy source. The occurrence of dayside compressio. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021134 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021134
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Authors: Woodger L A, Halford A J, Millan R M, McCarthy M P, Smith D M, et al.
Title: A Summary of the BARREL Campaigns: Technique for studying electron precipitation
Abstract: The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) studies the loss of energetic electrons from Earth's radiation belts. BARREL's array of slowly drifting balloon payloads was designed to capitalize on magnetic conjunctions with NASA's Van Allen Probes. Two campaigns were conducted from Antarctica in 2013 and 2014. During the first campaign in January and February of 2013, there were three moderate geomagnetic storms with Sym-Hmin < −40 nT. Similarly, two minor geomagnetic storms occurred during the second campaign, starting in December of 2013 and continuing on into February of 2014. Throughout the two campaigns, BARREL observed electron precipitation over a wide range of energies and exhibiting temporal structure from 100's of milliseconds to hours. Relativistic. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020874 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020874
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Authors: Thaller S. A., Wygant J R, Dai L., Breneman A.W., Kersten K., et al.
Title: Van Allen Probes investigation of the large scale duskward electric field and its role in ring current formation and plasmasphere erosion in the June 1, 2013 storm
Abstract: Using the Van Allen Probes we investigate the enhancement in the large scale duskward convection electric field during the geomagnetic storm (Dst ~ −120 nT) on June 1, 2013 and its role in ring current ion transport and energization, and plasmasphere erosion. During this storm, enhancements of ~1-2 mV/m in the duskward electric field in the co-rotating frame are observed down to L shells as low as ~2.3. A simple model consisting of a dipole magnetic field and constant, azimuthally westward, electric field is used to calculate the earthward and westward drift of 90° pitch angle ions. This model is applied to determine how far earthward ions can drift while remaining on Earth's night side, given the strength and duration of the convection electric field. The calculation based on this simp. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020875 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020875
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Authors: Ni Binbin, Zou Zhengyang, Gu Xudong, Zhou Chen, Thorne Richard M, et al.
Title: Variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultra-relativistic electrons during and following intense geomagnetic storms: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: Fifteen months of pitch angle resolved Van Allen Probes REPT measurements of differential electron flux are analyzed to investigate the characteristic variability of the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of radiation belt ultra-relativistic (>2 MeV) electrons during storm conditions and during the long-term post-storm decay. By modeling the ultra-relativistic electron pitch angle distribution as sinn α, where α is the equatorial pitch angle, we examine the spatio-temporal variations of the n-value. The results show that in general n-values increase with the level of geomagnetic activity. In principle, ultra-relativistic electrons respond to geomagnetic storms by becoming more peaked at 90° pitch angle with n-values of 2–3 as a supportive signature of chorus acceleration outside the pla. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021065 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021065
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Authors: Artemyev A.V., Agapitov O.V., Mourenas D., Krasnoselskikh V.V., and Mozer F.S.
Title: Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth’s radiation belts uncovers a missing energy
Abstract: Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth’s magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth’s magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heat. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Nature Communications Pages: 8143 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms8143 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms8143
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Su Zhenpeng, Zhou Qinghua, He Zhaoguo, et al.
Title: Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons
Abstract: Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosoni. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Nature Communications Pages: 8590 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9590 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms9590
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Authors: de Soria-Santacruz M., Li W, Thorne R M, Ma Q, Bortnik J, et al.
Title: Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Technique sensitivity analysis
Abstract: A novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron measurements from the POES spacecraft has been previously proposed to construct a global dynamic model of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves. In this paper we focus on plasmaspheric hiss, which is an incoherent broadband emission that plays a dominant role in the loss of energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere. We analyze the sensitivity of the POES technique to different inputs used to infer the hiss wave amplitudes during three conjunction events with the Van Allen Probes. These amplitudes are calculated with different input models of the plasma density, wave frequency spectrum, and electron energy spectrum, and the results are compared to the wave observations from the twin Van Allen Probes. Only. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020941 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020941
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Authors: Zhao Lei, Yu Yiqun, Delzanno Gian Luca, and Jordanova Vania K.
Title: Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the 17 March 2013 storm
Abstract: Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyroresonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the 17 March 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against nondipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB), a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field. By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and Magnetic Local Time (MLT)-averaged electron pit. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020858 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020858
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Authors: Nunn David, and Omura Yoshiharu
Title: A computational and theoretical investigation of nonlinear wave-particle interactions in oblique whistlers
Abstract: Most previous work on nonlinear wave-particle interactions between energetic electrons and VLF waves in the Earth's magnetosphere has assumed parallel propagation, the underlying mechanism being nonlinear trapping of cyclotron resonant electrons in a parabolic magnetic field inhomogeneity. Here nonlinear wave-particle interaction in oblique whistlers in the Earth's magnetosphere is investigated. The study is nonself-consistent and assumes an arbitrarily chosen wave field. We employ a “continuous wave” wave field with constant frequency and amplitude, and a model for an individual VLF chorus element. We derive the equations of motion and trapping conditions in oblique whistlers. The resonant particle distribution function, resonant current, and nonlinear growth rate are computed as func. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020898 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020898
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Authors: Clilverd Mark A., Duthie Roger, Hardman Rachael, Hendry Aaron T., Rodger Craig J., et al.
Title: Electron precipitation from EMIC waves: a case study from 31 May 2013
Abstract: On 31 May 2013 several rising-tone electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves with intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods (IPDP) were observed in the magnetic local time afternoon and evening sectors during the onset of a moderate/large geomagnetic storm. The waves were sequentially observed in Finland, Antarctica, and western Canada. Co-incident electron precipitation by a network of ground-based Antarctic Arctic Radiation-belt Dynamic Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) and riometer instruments, as well as the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) electron telescopes, was also observed. At the same time POES detected 30-80 keV proton precipitation drifting westwards at locations that were consistent with the ground-based observations, i. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021090 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021090
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Authors: Denton M. H., Thomsen M F, Jordanova V K, Henderson M G, Borovsky J E, et al.
Title: An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit
Abstract: Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite years of observations from the magnetospheric plasma analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bilinear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3 h Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2015SW001168 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015SW001168
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Authors: Drozdov A. Y., Shprits Y Y, Orlova K.G., Kellerman A. C., Subbotin D. A., et al.
Title: Energetic, relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons: Comparison of long-term VERB code simulations with Van Allen Probes measurements
Abstract: In this study, we compare long-term simulations performed by the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code with observations from the MagEIS and REPT instruments on the Van Allen Probes satellites. The model takes into account radial, energy, pitch-angle and mixed diffusion, losses into the atmosphere, and magnetopause shadowing. We consider the energetic (>100 keV), relativistic (~0.5-1 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (>2 MeV) electrons. One year of relativistic electron measurements (μ=700 MeV/G) from October 1, 2012 to October 1, 2013, are well reproduced by the simulation during varying levels of geomagnetic activity. However, for ultra-relativistic energies (μ=3500 MeV/G), the VERB code simulation overestimates electron fluxes and Phase Space Density. These results indicate that an . . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020637 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020637
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Authors: Němec F., Santolik O, Hrbáčková Z., Pickett J. S., and Cornilleau-Wehrlin N.
Title: Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity
Abstract: Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic wave events at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic line structure characteristic of the proton cyclotron frequency in the source region. However, they were generally believed to be continuous in time. We investigate more than 2000 EN events observed by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations and Wide-Band Data Plasma Wave investigation instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we show that this is not always the case. A clear quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity is present in more than 5% of events. We. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020816 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020816
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Authors: Vasko I. Y., Agapitov O. V., Mozer F, Artemyev A. V., and Jovanovic D.
Title: Magnetic field depression within electron holes
Abstract: We analyze electron holes that are spikes of the electrostatic field (up to 500 mV/m) observed by Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt. The unexpected feature is the magnetic field depression of about several tens of picotesla within many of the spikes. The earlier observations showed amplification or negligible perturbations of the magnetic field within the electron holes. We suggest that the observed magnetic field depression is due to the diamagnetic current of hot and highly anisotropic population of electrons trapped within the electron holes. The required trapped population should have a density up to 65% of the background plasma density, a temperature up to several keV, and a temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥∼2. We argue that the observed electron holes could be generated. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 2123 - 2129 DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063370 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063370
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Authors: Cho Junghee, Lee Dae-Young, Kim Jin-Hee, Shin Dae-Kyu, Kim Kyung-Chan, et al.
Title: New model fit functions of the plasmapause location determined using THEMIS observations during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24
Abstract: It is well known that the plasmapause is influenced by the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions. Empirical models of its location have been previously developed such as those by O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) and Larsen et al. (2006). In this study, we identified the locations of the plasmapause using the plasma density data obtained from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites. We used the data for the period (2008–2012) corresponding to the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24. Our database includes data from over a year of unusually weak solar wind conditions, correspondingly covering the plasmapause locations in a wider L range than those in previous studies. It also contains many coronal hole stream intervals during which the plasmasp. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021030 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021030
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Authors: Kim Jin-Hee, Lee Dae-Young, Cho Jung-Hee, Shin Dae-Kyu, Kim Kyung-Chan, et al.
Title: A prediction model for the global distribution of whistler chorus wave amplitude developed separately for two latitudinal zones
Abstract: Whistler mode chorus waves are considered to play a central role in accelerating and scattering electrons in the outer radiation belt. While in situ measurements are usually limited to the trajectories of a small number of satellites, rigorous theoretical modeling requires a global distribution of chorus wave characteristics. In the present work, by using a large database of chorus wave observations made on the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites for about 5 years, we develop prediction models for a global distribution of chorus amplitudes. The development is based on two main components: (a) the temporal dependence of average chorus amplitudes determined by correlating with the preceding solar wind and geomagnetic conditions as represented by t. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020900 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020900
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Authors: Stepanova Marina, and Antonova Elizaveta E.
Title: Role of turbulent transport in the evolution of the κ distribution functions in the plasma sheet
Abstract: We studied the evolution of ion and electron distribution functions, approximated by κ distributions, in the plasma sheet with the distance from the Earth using the data of the THEMIS spacecraft mission. Five events were used to calculate the main parameters of the κ distribution. For these events at least four spacecraft were aligned along the tail between approximately 7 and 30 Earth radii. It was found that for the majority of events the values of κ increase tailwards. The observed radial profiles could be related to the inner magnetosphere sources of particle acceleration and to the net tailward transport of particles. This net transport is the result of a balance between the average regular bulk transport toward the Earth and the turbulent transport by eddies in the tailward direct. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020684 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020684
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Authors: Lessard Marc R., Lindgren Erik A., Engebretson Mark J, and Weaver Carol
Title: Solar cycle dependence of ion cyclotron wave frequencies
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been studied for decades, though remain a fundamentally important topic in heliospheric physics. The connection of EMIC waves to the scattering of energetic particles from Earth's radiation belts is one ofmany topics that motivate the need for a deeper understanding of characteristics and occurrence distributions of the waves. In this study, we show that EMIC wave frequencies, as observed at Halley Station in Antarctica from 2008 through 2012, increase by approximately 60% from a minimum in 2009 to the end of 2012. Assuming that these waves are excited in the vicinity of the plasmapause, the change in Kp in going from solar minimum to near solar maximum would drive increased plasmapause erosion, potentially shifting the generation region of t. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020791 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020791
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Authors: Palin L., Jacquey C., Opgenoorth H., Connors M., Sergeev V., et al.
Title: Three-dimensional current systems and ionospheric effects associated with small dipolarisation fronts
Abstract: We present a case study of eight successive plasma sheet (PS) activations (usually referred to as bursty bulk flows or dipolarization fronts ) associated with small individual inline image increases on 31 March 2009 (0200–0900 UT), observed by the THEMIS mission. This series of events happens during very quiet solar wind conditions, over a period of 7 hours preceding a substorm onset at 1230 UT. The amplitude of the dipolarizations increases with time. The low-amplitude dipolarization fronts are associated with few (1 or 2) rapid flux transport events (RFT, Eh > 2mV/m), whereas the large-amplitude ones encompass many more RFT events. All PS activations are associated with small and localized substorm current wedge (SCW) like current system signatures, which seems to be the consequenc. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021040 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021040
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Authors: Mozer F.S., Agapitov O.V., Artemyev A., Drake J.F., Krasnoselskikh V., et al.
Title: Time Domain Structures: what and where they are, what they do, and how they are made
Abstract: Time Domain Structures (TDS) (electrostatic or electromagnetic electron holes, solitary waves, double layers, etc.) are ≥1 msec pulses having significant parallel (to the background magnetic field) electric fields. They are abundant through space and occur in packets of hundreds in the outer Van Allen radiation belts where they produce magnetic-field-aligned electron pitch angle distributions at energies up to a hundred keV. TDS can provide the seed electrons that are later accelerated to relativistic energies by whistlers and they also produce field-aligned electrons that may be responsible for some types of auroras. These field-aligned electron distributions result from at least three processes. The first process is parallel acceleration by Landau trapping in the TDS parallel electric . . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063946 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063946
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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Authors: Mourenas D., Artemyev A. V., Agapitov O. V., Krasnoselskikh V., and Mozer F.S.
Title: Very Oblique Whistler Generation By Low Energy Electron Streams
Abstract: Whistler-mode chorus waves are present throughout the Earth's outer radiation belt as well as at larger distances from our planet. While the generation mechanisms of parallel lower-band chorus waves and oblique upper-band chorus waves have been identified and checked in various instances, the statistically significant presence in recent satellite observations of very oblique lower-band chorus waves near the resonance cone angle remains to be explained. Here we discuss two possible generation mechanisms for such waves. The first one is based on Landau resonance with sporadic very low energy (<4 keV) electron beams either injected from the plasmasheet or produced in situ. The second one relies on cyclotron resonance with low energy electron streams, such that their velocity distribution poss. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021135 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021135
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Authors: Archer M. O., and Plaschke F.
Title: What frequencies of standing surface waves can the subsolar magnetopause support?
Abstract: It is has been proposed that the subsolar magnetopause may support its own eigenmode, consisting of propagating surface waves which reflect at the northern/southern ionospheres forming a standing wave. While the eigenfrequencies of these so-called Kruskal-Schwartzschild (KS) modes have been estimated under typical conditions, the potential distribution of frequencies over the full range of solar wind conditions is not know. Using models of the magnetosphere and magnetosheath applied to an entire solar cycle's worth of solar wind data, we perform time-of-flight calculations yielding a database of KS mode frequencies. Under non-storm times or northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the most likely fundamental frequency is calculated to be inline image mHz, consistent with previous est. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020545 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020545
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Authors: Simms Laura E., Engebretson Mark J, Smith A. J., Clilverd Mark, Pilipenko Viacheslav, et al.
Title: Analysis of the effectiveness of ground-based VLF wave observations for predicting or nowcasting relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit
Abstract: Poststorm relativistic electron flux enhancement at geosynchronous orbit has shown correlation with very low frequency (VLF) waves measured by satellite in situ. However, our previous study found little correlation between electron flux and VLF measured by a ground-based instrument at Halley, Antarctica. Here we explore several possible explanations for this low correlation. Using 220 storms (1992–2002), our previous work developed a predictive model of the poststorm flux at geosynchronous orbit based on explanatory variables measured a day or two before the flux increase. In a nowcast model, we use averages of variables from the time period when flux is rising during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms and limit the VLF (1.0 kHz) measure to the dawn period at Halley (09:00–12:0. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 2052 - 2060 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020337 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020337
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Authors: Halford A J, McGregor S. L., Murphy K. R., Millan R M, Hudson M K, et al.
Title: BARREL observations of an ICME-Shock impact with the magnetosphere and the resultant radiation belt electron loss.
Abstract: The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) mission of opportunity working in tandem with the Van Allen Probes was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. BARREL is also sensitive to X-rays from other sources. During the second BARREL campaign the Sun produced an X-class flare followed by a solar energetic particle event (SEP) associated with the same active region. Two days later on 9 January 2014 the shock generated by the coronal mass ejection (CME) originating from the active region hit the Earth while BARREL was in a close conjunction with the Van Allen Probes. Time History Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observed the impact of the ICME-shock near the magnetopause, and th. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020873 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020873
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Authors: Drake J. F., Agapitov O. V., and Mozer F S
Title: The development of a bursty precipitation front with intense localized parallel electric fields driven by whistler waves
Abstract: The dynamics and structure of whistler turbulence relevant to electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt is explored with simulations and comparisons with observations. An initial state with an electron temperature anisotropy in a spatially localized domain drives whistlers which scatter electrons. An outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons nonlinearly evolves to form regions of intense parallel electric field with structure similar to observations. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063528 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063528
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Authors: Su Zhenpeng, Zhu Hui, Xiao Fuliang, Zheng Huinan, Wang Yuming, et al.
Title: Disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss following interplanetary shock
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is one of the important plasma waves controlling radiation belt dynamics. Its spatiotemporal distribution and generation mechanism are presently the object of active research. We here give the first report on the shock-induced disappearance of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the Van Allen Probes on 8 October 2013. This special event exhibits the dramatic variability of plasmaspheric hiss and provides a good opportunity to test its generation mechanisms. The origination of plasmaspheric hiss from plasmatrough chorus is suggested to be an appropriate prerequisite to explain this event. The shock increased the suprathermal electron fluxes, and then the enhanced Landau damping promptly prevented chorus waves from entering the plasmasphere. Subsequently, the shrinking magnetop. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063906 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063906
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Authors: Halford A J, Fraser B. J., and Morley S. K.
Title: EMIC waves and plasmaspheric and plume density: CRRES results
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves frequently occur during geomagnetic storms, specifically during the main phase and 3–6 days following the minimum Sym − H value. EMIC waves contribute to the loss of ring current ions and radiation belt MeV electrons. Recent studies have suggested that cold plasma density structures found inside the plasmasphere and plasmaspheric plumes are important for the generation and propagation of EMIC waves. During the CRRES mission, 913 EMIC wave events and 124 geomagnetic storms were identified. In this study we compare the quiet time cold plasma density to the cold plasma density measured during EMIC wave events across different geomagnetic conditions. We found statistically that EMIC waves occurred in regions of enhanced densities. EMIC waves were,. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1974 - 1992 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020338 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020338
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Authors: Miyoshi Y, Oyama S., Saito S., Kurita S., Fujiwara H., et al.
Title: Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations
Abstract: Pulsating auroras show quasi-periodic intensity modulations caused by the precipitation of energetic electrons of the order of tens of keV. It is expected theoretically that not only these electrons but also sub-relativistic/relativistic electrons precipitate simultaneously into the ionosphere owing to whistler-mode wave–particle interactions. The height-resolved electron density profile was observed with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Tromsø VHF radar on 17 November 2012. Electron density enhancements were clearly identified at altitudes >68 km in association with the pulsating aurora, suggesting precipitation of electrons with a broadband energy range from ~10 keV up to at least 200 keV. The riometer and network of subionospheric radio wave observations also showed the energ. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020690 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020690
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Authors: Wang Chengrui, Rankin Robert, and Zong Qiugang
Title: Fast damping of ultralow frequency waves excited by interplanetary shocks in the magnetosphere
Abstract: Analysis of Cluster spacecraft data shows that intense ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere can be excited by the impact of interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations. The observations reveal that such waves can be damped away rapidly in a few tens of minutes. Here we examine mechanisms of ULF wave damping for two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001. The mechanisms considered are ionospheric joule heating, Landau damping, and waveguide energy propagation. It is shown that Landau damping provides the dominant ULF wave damping for the shock events of interest. It is further demonstrated that damping is caused by drift-bounce resonance with ions in the energy range of a few keV. Landau damping is shown to b. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020761 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020761
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Authors: Ukhorskiy A Y, Sitnov M I, Millan R M, Kress B T, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt
Abstract: The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (>0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity, electron intensities in the belt can vary by ordersof magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the main-phase depletions: adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused by the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere, and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the adiabatic effect and magnetopause . . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020645 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020645
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Authors: Selesnick R. S.
Title: High-energy radiation belt electrons from CRAND
Abstract: A calculation of the inner radiation belt electron source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) is described. High-energy electrons are included by Lorentz-transforming the β decay spectrum from the neutron rest frame to the Earth's rest frame and combining with the known high-energy albedo neutron energy spectrum. Balancing the electron source with energy loss to atmospheric neutral atoms and plasma, and with a decay lifetime representative of plasma wave scattering, then provides an estimate of trapped electron intensity. It is well below measured values for low energies, confirming that CRAND is not a significant source of those trapped electrons. For kinetic energies above the maximum β decay energy (E > 0.8 MeV) a power law energy spectrum ∼E−4 is predicted. For L = 1.5. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020963 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020963
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Authors: Němec F., Santolik O, Hrbáčková Z., and Cornilleau-Wehrlin N.
Title: Intensities and spatiotemporal variability of equatorial noise emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft
Abstract: Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic waves observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency. We present the analysis of 2229 EN events identified in the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment data of the Cluster spacecraft during the years 2001–2010. EN emissions are distinguished using the polarization analysis, and their intensity is determined based on the evaluation of the Poynting flux rather than on the evaluation of only the electric/magnetic field intensity. The intensity of EN events is analyzed as a function of the frequency, the position of the spacecraft inside/outside the plasmasphere, magnetic local time, and the geomagnetic activity. Th. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1620 - 1632 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020814 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020814
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