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Authors: Li W, Ma Q, Thorne R M, Bortnik J, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their Effects on radiation belt electron dynamics
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak frequencies are generally lower than the commonly adopted value (~550 Hz), which was in frequent use, and that the hiss wave power frequently extends below 100 Hz, particularly at larger L shells (> ~3) on the dayside during enhanced levels of substorm activity. We also compare electron pitch angle scattering rates caused by hiss . . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021048 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021048
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Authors: Li Zan, Millan Robyn M., Hudson Mary K, Woodger Leslie A., Smith David M., et al.
Title: Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL January 17, 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: a quantitative comparison of simulation with observations
Abstract: Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves were observed at multiple observatory locations for several hours on 17 January 2013. During the wave activity period, a duskside relativistic electron precipitation (REP) event was observed by one of the BARREL balloons, and was magnetically mapped close to GOES-13. We simulate the relativistic electron pitch-angle diffusion caused by gyroresonant interactions with EMIC waves using wave and particle data measured by multiple instruments on board GOES-13 and the Van Allen Probes. We show that the count rate, the energy distribution and the time variation of the simulated precipitation all agree very well with the balloon observations, suggesting that EMIC wave scattering was likely the cause for the precipitation event. The event reported here is . . .
Date: 12/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062273 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014GL062273
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Jaynes Allison, Boyd Alexander, Malaspina David, et al.
Title: Modeling Gradual Diffusion Changes in Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes Case Study
Abstract: March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two timescales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration [Baker et al., 2014]. A radial diffusion model was applied to the month-long interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤400 MeV/G, but peaks in phase space density observed by the ECT instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the month-long interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which e. . .
Date: 10/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020359 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020359
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Authors: Li Zhao, Hudson Mary, Paral Jan, Wiltberger Michael, and Turner Drew
Title: Global ULF wave analysis of radial diffusion coefficients using a global MHD model for the 17 March 2015 storm
Abstract: The 17–18 March 2015 storm is the largest geomagnetic storm in the Van Allen Probes era to date. The Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model has been run for this event using ARTEMIS data as solar wind input. The ULF wave power spectral density of the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field is analyzed in the 0.5–8.3 mHz range. The lowest three azimuthal modes account for 70% of the total power during quiet times. However, during high activity, they are not exclusively dominant. The calculation of the radial diffusion coefficient is presented. We conclude that the electric field radial diffusion coefficient is dominant over the magnetic field coefficient by one to two orders of magnitude. This result contrasts with the dominant magnetic field diffusion coefficient used i. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022508 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022508
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Authors: Li X, Schiller Q., Blum L., Califf S., Zhao H., et al.
Title: First Results from CSSWE CubeSat: Characteristics of Relativistic Electrons in the Near-Earth Environment During the October 2012 Magnetic Storms
Abstract: Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat mission, which was launched into a highly inclined (65°) low Earth orbit, are analyzed along with measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes, which are in a low inclination (10°) geo-transfer-like orbit. Both REPT and MagEIS measure the full distribution of energetic electrons as they traverse the heart of the outer radiation belt. However, due to the small equatorial loss cone (only a few degrees), it is difficult for REPT and MagEIS to directly determine which electrons will precipitate into the. . .
Date: 10/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019342 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JA019342
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Authors: Li W, Santolik O, Bortnik J, Thorne R M, Kletzing C A, et al.
Title: New Chorus Wave Properties Near the Equator from Van Allen Probes Wave Observations
Abstract: The chorus wave properties are evaluated using Van Allen Probes data in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere. Two distinct modes of lower band chorus are identified: a quasi-parallel mode and a quasi-electrostatic mode, whose wave normal direction is close to the resonance cone. Statistical results indicate that the quasi-electrostatic (quasi-parallel) mode preferentially occurs during relatively quiet (disturbed) geomagnetic activity at lower (higher) L shells. Although the magnetic intensity of the quasi-electrostatic mode is considerably weaker than the quasi-parallel mode, their electric intensities are comparable. A newly identified feature of the quasi-electrostatic mode is that its frequency peaks at higher values compared to the quasi-parallel mode that exhibits a broad frequency s. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068780 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068780
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Authors: Li X, Selesnick R. S., Baker D N, Jaynes A. N., Kanekal S G, et al.
Title: Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron Intensity
Abstract: No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (10s of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable, thus for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because of their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020777 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020777
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Authors: Lessard Marc R., Paulson Kristoff, Spence Harlan E., Weaver Carol, Engebretson Mark J, et al.
Title: Generation of EMIC Waves and Effects on Particle Precipitation During a Solar Wind Pressure Intensification with B z >
Abstract: During geomagnetic storms, some fraction of the solar wind energy is coupled via reconnection at the dayside magnetopause, a process that requires a southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Through a complex sequence of events, some of this energy ultimately drives the generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which can then scatter energetic electrons and ions from the radiation belts. In the event described in this paper, the interplanetary magnetic field remained northward throughout the event, a condition unfavorable for solar wind energy coupling through low‐latitude reconnection. While this resulted in SYM/H remaining positive throughout the event (so this may not be considered a storm, in spite of the very high solar wind densities), pressure fluctuations were d. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026477 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA026477
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Roederer Juan G.
Title: The “zebra stripes”: An effect of F-region zonal plasma drifts on the longitudinal distribution of radiation belt particles
Abstract: We examine a characteristic effect, namely, the ubiquitous appearance of structured peaks and valleys called zebra stripes in the spectrograms of energetic electrons and ions trapped in the inner belt below L ~ 3. We propose an explanation of this phenomenon as a purely kinematic consequence of particle drift velocity modulation caused by F region zonal plasma drifts in the ionosphere. In other words, we amend the traditional assumption that the electric field associated with ionospheric plasma drives trapped particle distributions into rigid corotation with the Earth. An equation based on a simple first-order model is set up to determine quantitatively the appearance of zebra stripes as a function of magnetic time. Our numerical predictions are in agreement with measurements by the Ra. . .
Date: 01/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021925 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021925
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Mozer F S
Title: Shorting Factor In‐Flight Calibration for the Van Allen Probes DC Electric Field Measurements in the Earth's Plasmasphere
Abstract: Satellite‐based direct electric field measurements deliver crucial information for space science studies. Yet they require meticulous design and calibration. In‐flight calibration of double‐probe instruments is usually presented in the most common case of tenuous plasmas, where the presence of an electrostatic structure surrounding the charged spacecraft alters the geophysical electric field measurements. To account for this effect and the uncertainty in the boom length, the measured electric field is multiplied by a parameter called the shorting factor (sf). In the plasmasphere, the Debye length is very small in comparison with spacecraft dimension, and there is no shorting of the electric field measurements (sf = 1). However, the electric field induced by spacecraft motion greatly . . .
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Earth and Space Science Pages: 646 - 654 DOI: 10.1029/2018EA000550 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018EA000550
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Authors: Lejosne Solène, and Mozer F S
Title: Van Allen Probe measurements of the electric drift E × B/B2 at Arecibo's L = 1.4 field line coordinate
Abstract: We have used electric and magnetic measurements by Van Allen Probe B from 2013 to 2014 to examine the equatorial electric drift E × B/B2 at one field line coordinate set to Arecibo's incoherent scatter radar location (L = 1.43). We report on departures from the traditional picture of corotational motion with the Earth in two ways: (1) the rotational angular speed is found to be 10% smaller than the rotational angular speed of the Earth, in agreement with previous works on plasmaspheric notches, and (2) the equatorial electric drift displays a dependence in magnetic local time, with a pattern consistent with the mapping of the Arecibo ionosphere dynamo electric fields along equipotential magnetic field lines. The electric fields due to the ionosphere dynamo are therefore expected t. . .
Date: 07/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 6768 - 6774 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL069875 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL069875
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Magnetic activity dependence of the electric drift below L=3
Abstract: More than two years of magnetic and electric field measurements by the Van Allen Probes are analyzed with the objective of determining the average effects of magnetic activity on the electric drift below L=3. The study finds that an increase in magnetospheric convection leads to a decrease in the magnitude of the azimuthal component of the electric drift, especially in the night‐side. The amplitude of the slowdown is a function of L, local time MLT, and Kp, in a pattern consistent with the storm‐time dynamics of the ionosphere and thermosphere. To a lesser extent, magnetic activity also alters the average radial component of the electric drift below L=3. A global picture for the average variations of the electric drift with Kp is provided as a function of L and MLT. It is the first tim. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077873 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077873
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) duration as determined from Van Allen Probe successive electric drift measurements
Abstract: We examine a characteristic feature of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, namely, the persistent and latitudinally narrow bands of rapid westward ion drifts called the Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS). Despite countless works on SAPS, information relative to their durations is lacking. Here, we report on the first statistical analysis of more than 200 near-equatorial SAPS observations based on more than two years of Van Allen Probe electric drift measurements. First, we present results relative to SAPS radial locations and amplitudes. Then, we introduce two different ways to estimate SAPS durations. In both cases, SAPS activity is estimated to last for about nine hours on average. However, our estimates for SAPS duration are limited either by the relatively long orbital periods . . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074985 Available at: http://http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074985/full
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Kunduri B. S. R., Mozer F S, and Turner D. L.
Title: Energetic electron injections deep into the inner magnetosphere: a result of the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) potential drop
Abstract: It has been reported that the dynamics of energetic (tens to hundreds of keV) electrons and ions is inconsistent with the theoretical picture in which the large‐scale electric field is a superposition of corotation and convection electric fields. Combining one year of measurements by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, DMSP F‐18 and the Van Allen Probes, we show that subauroral polarization streams are observed when energetic electrons have penetrated below L = 4. Outside the plasmasphere in the premidnight region, potential energy is subtracted from the total energy of ions and added to the total energy of electrons during SAPS onset. This potential energy is converted into radial motion as the energetic particles drift around Earth and leave the SAPS azimuthal sector. As a result, . . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077969 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL077969
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Authors: Lejosne ène, Maus Stefan, and Mozer F S
Title: Model-observation comparison for the geographic variability of the plasma electric drift in the Earth's innermost magnetosphere
Abstract: Plasmaspheric rotation is known to lag behind Earth rotation. The causes for this corotation lag are not yet fully understood. We have used more than two years of Van Allen Probe observations to compare the electric drift measured below L~2 with the predictions of a general model. In the first step, a rigid corotation of the ionosphere with the solid Earth was assumed in the model. The results of the model-observation comparison are twofold: (1) radially, the model explains the average observed geographic variability of the electric drift; (2) azimuthally, the model fails to explain the full amplitude of the observed corotation lag. In the second step, ionospheric corotation was modulated in the model by thermospheric winds, as given by the latest version of the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM1. . .
Date: 07/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074862 Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074862/full
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Authors: Lejosne ène, and Mozer F S
Title: Typical values of the electric drift E  ×  B / B 2 in the inner radiation belt and slot region as determined from Van Allen Probe measurements
Abstract: The electric drift E × B/B2 plays a fundamental role for the description of plasma flow and particle acceleration. Yet it is not well-known in the inner belt and slot region because of a lack of reliable in situ measurements. In this article, we present an analysis of the electric drifts measured below L ~ 3 by both Van Allen Probes A and B from September 2012 to December 2014. The objective is to determine the typical components of the equatorial electric drift in both radial and azimuthal directions. The dependences of the components on radial distance, magnetic local time, and geographic longitude are examined. The results from Van Allen Probe A agree with Van Allen Probe B. They show, among other things, a typical corotation lag of the order of 5 to 10% below L ~ 2.6, as w. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023613 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023613/full
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Authors: Lei Mingda, Xie Lun, Li Jinxing, Pu Zuyin, Fu Suiyan, et al.
Title: The Radiation Belt Electron Scattering by Magnetosonic Wave: Dependence on Key Parameters
Abstract: Magnetosonic (MS) waves have been found capable of creating radiation belt electron butterfly distributions in the inner magnetosphere. To investigate the physical nature of the interactions between radiation belt electrons and MS waves, and to explore a preferential condition for MS waves to scatter electrons efficiently, we performed a comprehensive parametric study of MS wave-electron interactions using test particle simulations. The diffusion coefficients simulated by varying the MS wave frequency show that the scattering effect of MS waves is frequency insensitive at low harmonics (f < 20 fcp), which has great implications on modeling the electron scattering caused by MS waves with harmonic structures. The electron scattering caused by MS waves is very sensitive to wave normal angles,. . .
Date: 12/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023801 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023801/full
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Authors: Lee Jongkil, Kim Kyung-Chan, Giuseppe Romeo, Ukhorskiy Sasha, Sibeck David, et al.
Title: Space Weather Operation at KASI with Van Allen Probes Beacon Signals
Abstract: The Van Allen Probes (VAPs) are the only modern NASA spacecraft broadcasting real-time data on the Earth's radiation belts for space weather operations. Since 2012, the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has contributed to the receipt of this data via a 7-m satellite tracking antenna and used these data for space weather operations. An approximately 15-min period is required from measurement to acquisition of Level-1 data. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of VAP data for monitoring space weather conditions at geostationary orbit (GEO) by highlighting the Saint Patrick's Day storm of 2015. During that storm, Probe-A observed a significant increase in the relativistic electron flux at 3 RE. Those electrons diffused outward resulting in a large increase of the electron fl. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2017SW001726 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001726/full
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Authors: Lee Jeongwoo, Min Kyungguk, and Kim Kap-Sung
Title: Characteristic dimension of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave activity in the magnetosphere
Abstract: [1] In this paper, we estimate the size of coherent activity of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves using the multi‒spacecraft observations made during the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. We calculate the cross‒correlations between EMIC wave powers measured by different THEMIS spacecraft, plot them over the separation distances between pairs of observing spacecraft, and determine the 1/e folding distance of the correlations as the characteristic dimension of the coherent wave activity. The characteristic radius in the direction transverse to the local magnetic field is found to lie in rather a wide range of 1500–8600 km varying from the AM to PM sectors and also from hydrogen to helium bands. However, the characteristic d. . .
Date: 04/2013 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1651 - 1658 DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50242 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jgra.50242
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Authors: Le G., Chi P. J., Strangeway R J, Russell C. T., Slavin J. A., et al.
Title: Global observations of magnetospheric high- m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm
Abstract: We report global observations of high-m poloidal waves during the recovery phase of the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm from a constellation of widely spaced satellites of five missions including Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS), Cluster, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). The combined observations demonstrate the global spatial extent of storm time poloidal waves. MMS observations confirm high azimuthal wave numbers (m ~ 100). Mode identification indicates the waves are associated with the second harmonic of field line resonances. The wave frequencies exhibit a decreasing trend as L increases, distinguishing them from the single-frequency global poloidal modes normally obs. . .
Date: 04/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL073048 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL073048/full
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Authors: Lanzerotti Louis J.
Title: Space Research and Space Weather: Some Personal Vignettes 1965 to Early 1980s
Abstract: Personal vignettes are given on early days of space research, space weather, and space advisory activities from 1965 to early 1980s.
Date: 04/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA026763 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019JA026763
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Authors: Lanzerotti Louis J., and Baker Daniel N
Title: Space Weather Research: Earth's Radiation Belts
Abstract: Fundamental research on Earth's space radiation environment is essential for the design and the operations of modern technologies – for communications, weather, navigation, national security – that fly in the hostile space weather conditions above Earth's atmosphere. As the technologies become ever more advanced, more sophisticated understanding – and even predictability – of the environment is required for mission success
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Space Weather DOI: 10.1002/2017SW001654 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017SW001654/full
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Authors: Kurth W S, De Pascuale S., Faden J. B., Kletzing C A, Hospodarsky G B, et al.
Title: Electron Densities Inferred from Plasma Wave Spectra Obtained by the Waves Instrument on Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft, launched in August 2012, carry identical scientific payloads. The Electric and Magnetic Fields Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) suite includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that measures three magnetic and three electric components of plasma waves in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 12 kHz using triaxial search coils and the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) triaxial electric field sensors. The Waves instrument also measures a single electric field component of waves in the frequency range of 10 to 500 kHz. A primary objective of the higher frequency measurements is the determination of the electron density ne at the spacecraft, primarily inferred from the upper hybrid resonance frequency fuh. Considerable work has gone into developing . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020857 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020857
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Authors: Kurita S., Miyoshi Y, Shiokawa K., Higashio N., Mitani T., et al.
Title: Rapid loss of relativistic electrons by EMIC waves in the outer radiation belt observed by Arase, Van Allen Probes, and the PWING ground stations
Abstract: There has been increasing evidence for pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Theoretical studies have predicted that the loss time scale of MeV electrons by EMIC waves can be very fast, suggesting that MeV electron fluxes rapidly decrease in association with the EMIC wave activity. This study reports on a unique event of MeV electron loss induced by EMIC waves based on Arase, Van Allen Probes, and ground‐based network observations. Arase observed a signature of MeV electron loss by EMIC waves, and the satellite and ground‐based observations constrained spatial‐temporal variations of the EMIC wave activity during the loss event. Multi‐satellite observation of MeV electron fluxes showed that ~2.5 MeV electron fluxes substantia. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080262 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080262
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Authors: Kurita Satoshi, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Blake Bernard, Reeves Geoffery D., and Kletzing Craig A.
Title: Relativistic electron microbursts and variations in trapped MeV electron fluxes during the 8-9 October 2012 storm: SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8–9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that acceleration by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It . . .
Date: 02/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068260 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068260http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL068260
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Authors: Kubota Yuko, Omura Yoshiharu, Kletzing Craig, and Reeves Geoff
Title: Generation process of large-amplitude upper band chorus emissions observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We analyze large‐amplitude upper‐band chorus emissions measured near the magnetic equator by the EMFISIS (Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science) instrument package onboard the Van Allen Probes. In setting up the parameters of source electrons exciting the emissions based on theoretical analyses and observational results measured by the HOPE (Helium Oxygen Proton Electron) instrument, we calculate threshold and optimum amplitudes with the nonlinear wave growth theory. We find that the optimum amplitude is larger than the threshold amplitude obtained in the frequency range of the chorus emissions and that the wave amplitudes grow between the threshold and optimum amplitudes. In the frame of the wave growth process, the nonlinear growth rates are much greater. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA024782 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA024782
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Authors: Kronberg E. A., Grigorenko E. E., Turner D. L., Daly P. W., Khotyaintsev Y., et al.
Title: Comparing and contrasting dispersionless injections at geosynchronous orbit during a substorm event
Abstract: Particle injections in the magnetosphere transport electrons and ions from the magnetotail to the radiation belts. Here we consider generation mechanisms of “dispersionless” injections, namely, those with simultaneous increase of the particle flux over a wide energy range. In this study we take advantage of multisatellite observations which simultaneously monitor Earth's magnetospheric dynamics from the tail toward the radiation belts during a substorm event. Dispersionless injections are associated with instabilities in the plasma sheet during the growth phase of the substorm, with a dipolarization front at the onset and with magnetic flux pileup during the expansion phase. They show different spatial spread and propagation characteristics. Injection associated with the dipolarization. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023551 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023551/full
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Authors: Korotova G. I., Sibeck D G, Tahakashi K., Dai L., Spence H E, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probe observations of drift-bounce resonances with Pc 4 pulsations and wave–particle interactions in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We present Van Allen Probe B observations of azimuthally limited, antisymmetric, poloidal Pc 4 electric and magnetic field pulsations in the pre-midnight sector of the magnetosphere from 05:40 to 06:00 UT on 1 May 2013. Oscillation periods were similar for the magnetic and electric fields and proton fluxes. The flux of energetic protons exhibited an energy-dependent response to the pulsations. Energetic proton variations were anticorrelated at medium and low energies. Although we attribute the pulsations to a drift-bounce resonance, we demonstrate that the energy-dependent response of the ion fluxes results from pulsation-associated velocities sweeping energy-dependent radial ion flux gradients back and forth past the spacecraft.
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 955 - 964 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-33-955-2015 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/33/955/2015/angeo-33-955-2015.pdf
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Authors: Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, Acuna M, MacDowall R J, Torbert R B, et al.
Title: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on RBSP
Abstract: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation on the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (now named the Van Allen Probes) mission provides key wave and very low frequency magnetic field measurements to understand radiation belt acceleration, loss, and transport. The key science objectives and the contribution that EMFISIS makes to providing measurements as well as theory and modeling are described. The key components of the instruments suite, both electronics and sensors, including key functional parameters, calibration, and performance, demonstrate that EMFISIS provides the needed measurements for the science of the RBSP mission. The EMFISIS operational modes and data products, along with online availability and data tools provide the radiation bel. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9993-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9993-6
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Authors: Kletzing C. A.
Title: Recent results from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/USNC-URSI-NRSM.2014.6928090 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6928090
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Authors: Kletzing Craig A.
Title: Progress on understanding chorus emissions from data of the electric and magnetic field instrument suite and integrated science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A key wave-particle interaction important to both acceleration and loss in the radiation belts is the of whistler-mode chorus interacting with energetic electrons. To measure this important radiation belt interaction, the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission utilizes one of the most complete sets of measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnet. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929872 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929872
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Authors: Kistler L.M., Mouikis C. G., Spence H.E., Menz A.M., Skoug R.M., et al.
Title: The Source of O + in the Storm-time Ring Current
Abstract: A stretched and compressed geomagnetic field occurred during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm on 1 June 2013. During the storm the Van Allen Probes spacecraft made measurements of the plasma sheet boundary layer, and observed large fluxes of O+ ions streaming up the field line from the nightside auroral region. Prior to the storm main phase there was an increase in the hot (>1 keV) and more isotropic O+ions in the plasma sheet. In the spacecraft inbound pass through the ring current region during the storm main phase, the H+ and O+ ions were significantly enhanced. We show that this enhanced inner magnetosphere ring current population is due to the inward adiabatic convection of the plasma sheet ion population. The energy range of the O+ ion plasma sheet that impacts the ring curren. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA022204 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA022204
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Authors: Kirby Karen, and Stratton Jim
Title: Van Allen Probes: Successful launch campaign and early operations exploring Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probe observatories developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's Heliophysics Division completed final observatory integration and environmental test activities and were successfully launched into orbit around the Earth on August 30, 2012. As the science operations phase begins, the mission is providing exciting new information about the impact of radiation belt activity on the earth. The on-board boom mounted magnetometers and other instruments are the most sensitive sensors of their type that have ever flown in the Van Allen radiation belts. The observatories are producing near-Earth space weather information that can be used to provide warnings of potential power grid interruptions or satellite damaging storms. The Van Allen Probes a. . .
Date: 03/2013 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2013.6496838 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6496838
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Artis David, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes—Observatory and Environments
Abstract: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission that launched August 30, 2012, and is the latest science mission in NASA’s Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, as well as the influence of the Sun on the Earth’s environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning observatories in an elliptical orbit around earth with 600 km perigee, 30,000 km apogee and 10∘ inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin RBSP observatories (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) wil. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 59-125 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9949-2 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9949-2
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, Fretz Kristen, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design
Abstract: NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning spacecraft in an elliptical orbit around earth from 600 km perigee to 30,000 km apogee at 10 degree inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin spacecraft will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other 4 times per year; this offers simultaneous meas. . .
Date: 03/2012 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06187020
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Fretz Kristin, Goldsten John, and Maurer Richard
Title: Successes and challenges of operating the Van Allen Probes mission in the radiation belts
Abstract: The Van Allen probes team has been successful in monitoring and trending the performance of the mission to date. However, operating two spacecraft in the Van Allen radiation belts poses a number of challenges and requires careful monitoring of spacecraft performance due to the high radiation environment and potential impact on the mostly single string electronics architecture. Spacecraft and instrument telemetry trending is tracked with internal peer reviews conducted twice a year by the operations and engineering teams. On board radiation monitoring sensors are used to evaluate total dose accumulated on board the spacecraft and to assess potential impacts. Single event upsets are tracked and high activity events are logged and analyzed. Anomalous data is compared to radiation and solar ev. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2015.7119179 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=7119179
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Authors: Kim S.-I., Kim K.-H., Kwon H.-J., Jin H., Lee E., et al.
Title: SC-associated electric field variations in the magnetosphere and ionospheric convective flows
Abstract: We examine magnetic and electric field perturbations associated with a sudden commencement (SC), caused by an interplanetary (IP) shock passing over the Earth's magnetosphere on 16 February 2013. The SC was identified in the magnetic and electric field data measured at THEMIS-E (THE-E: MLT = 12.4, L = 6.3), Van Allen Probe-A (VAP-A: MLT = 3.2, L = 5.1), and Van Allen Probe-B (VAP-B: MLT = 0.2. L= 4.9) in the magnetosphere. During the SC interval, THE-E observed a dawnward-then-duskward electric (E) field perturbation around noon, while VAP-B observed a duskward E-field perturbation around midnight. VAP-A observed a dawnward-then-duskward E-field perturbation in the postmidnight sector, but the duration and magnitude of the dawnward E-perturbation are much shorter and weaker than that at TH. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024611 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024611/full
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Authors: Kim Hyomin, Gerrard Andrew J., Lanzerotti Louis J., Soto-Chavez Rualdo, Cohen Ross J., et al.
Title: Ring Current He-Ion Control by Bounce Resonant ULF Waves
Abstract: Ring current energy He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV) differential flux data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft show considerable variability during quiet solar wind and geomagnetic time periods. Such variability is apparent from orbit to orbit (∼9 hours) of the spacecraft and is observed to be ∼50–100% of the nominal flux. Using data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument, also aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, we identify that a dominant source of this variability is from ULF waveforms with periods of 10's of sec. These periods correspond to the bounce resonant timescales of the ring current He-ions being measured by RBSPICE. A stat. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA023958 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA023958/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung-Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Dependence of the amplitude of magnetosonic waves on the solar wind and AE index using Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We present the dependence of the magnetosonic wave amplitudes both outside and inside the plasmapause on the solar wind and AE index using Van Allen Probe-A spacecraft during the time period of 1 October 2012 to 31 December 2015, based on a correlation and regression analysis. Solar wind parameters considered are the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF BS), solar wind number density (NSW), and bulk speed (VSW). We find that the wave amplitudes outside (inside) the plasmapause are well correlated with the preceding AE, IMF BS, and NSW with time delays, each corresponding to 2–3 h (3–4 h), 4–5 h (3–4 h), and 2–3 h (8–9 h), while the correlation with VSW is ambiguous both inside and outside the plasmapause. As measured by the correlation coefficient, the IMF BS is the mos. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024094 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024094/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung-Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Survey of the Favorable Conditions for Magnetosonic Wave Excitation
Abstract: The ratio of the proton ring velocity (VR) to the local Alfven speed (VA), in addition to proton ring distributions, plays a key factor in the excitation of magnetosonic waves at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency fcp and the lower hybrid resonance frequency fLHR in the Earth's magnetosphere. Here we investigate whether there is a statistically significant relationship between occurrences of proton rings and magnetosonic waves both outside and inside the plasmapause using particle and wave data from Van Allen Probe-A during the time period of October 2012 to December 2015. We also perform a statistical survey of the ratio of the ring energy (ER, corresponding to VR) to the Alfven energy (EA, corresponding to VA) to determine the favorable conditions under which magnetosonic. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024865 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024865/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung‐Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Statistical Analysis of Hiss Waves in Plasmaspheric Plumes Using Van Allen Probe Observations
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss waves commonly observed in high‐density regions in the Earth's magnetosphere are known to be one of the main contributors to the loss of radiation belt electrons. There has been a lot of effort to investigate the distributions of hiss waves in the plasmasphere, while relatively little attention has been given to those in the plasmaspheric plume. In this study, we present for the first time a statistical analysis of the occurrence and the spatial distribution of wave amplitudes and wave normal angles for hiss waves in plumes using Van Allen Probes observations during the period of October 2012 to December 2016. Statistical results show that a wide range of hiss wave amplitudes in plumes from a few picotesla to >100 pT is observed, but a modest (<20 pT) wave amplitude is. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1904 - 1915 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026458 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026458
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Turner D. L., Jaynes A. N., Hietala H., Koskinen H. E. J., et al.
Title: Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt Response to Interacting Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections
Abstract: We study the response of the outer Van Allen radiation belt during an intense magnetic storm on 15–22 February 2014. Four interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at Earth, of which the three last ones were interacting. Using data from the Van Allen Probes, we report the first detailed investigation of electron fluxes from source (tens of kiloelectron volts) to core (megaelectron volts) energies and possible loss and acceleration mechanisms as a response to substructures (shock, sheath and ejecta, and regions of shock‐compressed ejecta) in multiple interacting ICMEs. After an initial enhancement induced by a shock compression of the magnetosphere, core fluxes strongly depleted and stayed low for 4 days. This sustained depletion can be related to a sequence of ICME substruc. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1927 - 1947 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026238 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026238
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Authors: Khoo L.‐Y., Li X, Zhao H., Chu X., Xiang Z., et al.
Title: How Sudden, Intense Energetic Electron Enhancements Correlate With the Innermost Plasmapause Locations Under Various Solar Wind Drivers and Geomagnetic Conditions
Abstract: In this report, the relationship between innermost plasmapause locations (Lpp) and initial electron enhancements during both storm and nonstorm (Dst > −30 nT) periods are examined using data from the Van Allen Probes. The geomagnetic storms are classified into coronal mass ejection (CME)‐driven and corotating interaction region (CIR)‐driven storms to explore their influences on the initial electron enhancements, respectively. We also study nonstorm time electron enhancements and observe frequent, sudden (within two consecutive orbital passes) <400‐keV electron enhancements during quiet periods. Our analysis reveals an incredibly cohesive observation that holds regardless of electron energies (~30 keV–2.5 MeV) or geomagnetic conditions: the innermost Lpp is the innermost boundary . . .
Date: 11/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2019JA027412 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2019JA027412
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Authors: Khoo Leng Ying, Li Xinlin, Zhao Hong, Sarris Theodore, Xiang Zheng, et al.
Title: On the Initial Enhancement of Energetic Electrons and the Innermost Plasmapause Locations: CME-Driven Storm Periods
Abstract: Using Van Allen Probes’ observations and established plasmapause location (Lpp) models, we investigate the relationship between the location of the initial enhancement (IE) of energetic electrons and the innermost (among all magnetic local time sectors) Lpp over five intense storm periods. Our study reveals that the IE events for 30 keV to 2MeV electrons always occurred outside of the innermost Lpp. On average, the inner extent of the IE events (LIE) for <800 keV electrons was closer to the innermost Lpp when compared to the LIE for >800 keV electrons that was found consistently at ~1.5 RE outside of the innermost Lpp. The IE of 10s keV electrons was observed before the IE of 100s keV electrons, and the IE of >800 keV electrons was observed on average 12.6±2.3 hours after the occurrence. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026074 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026074
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Authors: Khazanov G. V., Boardsen S., Krivorutsky E. N., Engebretson M. J., Sibeck D., et al.
Title: Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B
Abstract: We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth . . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022814 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022814
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Authors: Khazanov G. V., Boardsen S., Krivorutsky E. N., Engebretson M. J., Sibeck D., et al.
Title: Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B
Abstract: We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth . . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 449 - 463 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022814 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022814/full
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Authors: Khazanov K. G. V., Sibeck D. G., Tel'nikhin A. A., and Kronberg T. K.
Title: Spectra of keV protons related to ion-cyclotron wave packets
Abstract: We use the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation to study the statistical aspects of stochastic dynamics of the radiation belt (RB) protons driven by nonlinear electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) wave packets. We obtain the spectra of keV protons scattered by these waves that show steeping near the gyroresonance, the signature of resonant wave-particle interaction that cannot be described by a simple power law. The most likely mechanism for proton precipitation events in RBs is shown to be nonlinear wave-particle interaction, namely, the scattering of RB protons into the loss cone by EMIC waves.
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4973323 Available at: http://http://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4973323
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Authors: Kessel R L, Fox N J, and Weiss M
Title: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) and Space Weather
Abstract: Following the launch and commissioning of NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) in 2012, space weather data will be generated and broadcast from the spacecraft in near real-time. The RBSP mission targets one part of the space weather chain: the very high energy electrons and ions magnetically trapped within Earth’s radiation belts. The understanding gained by RBSP will enable us to better predict the response of the radiation belts to solar storms in the future, and thereby protect space assets in the near-Earth environment. This chapter details the presently planned RBSP capabilities for generating and broadcasting near real-time space weather data, discusses the data products, the ground stations collecting the data, and the users/models that will incorporate the data into test-b. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 531-543 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9953-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9953-6
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Authors: Kessel Mona
Title: Things we don't yet understand about solar driving of the radiation belts.
Abstract: This commentary explores how close we are to predicting the behavior of the radiations belts - the primary science objective of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Starting with what we know or think we know about competing sources, enhancement, transport, and loss, I walk through recent papers that have improved our understanding and then focus on flux dropouts as one particular yardstick of success. I mention a new paradigm for electrons and the importance of reliably matching models and observations for different solar inputs. Although the case for prediction remains a work in progress, there are encouraging signs of progress.
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022472 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022472
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