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Authors: Kurth W S, De Pascuale S., Faden J. B., Kletzing C A, Hospodarsky G B, et al.
Title: Electron Densities Inferred from Plasma Wave Spectra Obtained by the Waves Instrument on Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft, launched in August 2012, carry identical scientific payloads. The Electric and Magnetic Fields Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) suite includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that measures three magnetic and three electric components of plasma waves in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 12 kHz using triaxial search coils and the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) triaxial electric field sensors. The Waves instrument also measures a single electric field component of waves in the frequency range of 10 to 500 kHz. A primary objective of the higher frequency measurements is the determination of the electron density ne at the spacecraft, primarily inferred from the upper hybrid resonance frequency fuh. Considerable work has gone into developing . . .
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020857 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020857
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Authors: Kurita Satoshi, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Blake Bernard, Reeves Geoffery D., and Kletzing Craig A.
Title: Relativistic electron microbursts and variations in trapped MeV electron fluxes during the 8-9 October 2012 storm: SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8–9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that acceleration by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It . . .
Date: 02/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: n/a - n/a DOI: 10.1002/2016GL068260 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL068260http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2016GL068260
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Authors: Kurita S., Miyoshi Y, Shiokawa K., Higashio N., Mitani T., et al.
Title: Rapid loss of relativistic electrons by EMIC waves in the outer radiation belt observed by Arase, Van Allen Probes, and the PWING ground stations
Abstract: There has been increasing evidence for pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Theoretical studies have predicted that the loss time scale of MeV electrons by EMIC waves can be very fast, suggesting that MeV electron fluxes rapidly decrease in association with the EMIC wave activity. This study reports on a unique event of MeV electron loss induced by EMIC waves based on Arase, Van Allen Probes, and ground‐based network observations. Arase observed a signature of MeV electron loss by EMIC waves, and the satellite and ground‐based observations constrained spatial‐temporal variations of the EMIC wave activity during the loss event. Multi‐satellite observation of MeV electron fluxes showed that ~2.5 MeV electron fluxes substantia. . .
Date: 11/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL080262 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080262
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Authors: Kurita Satoshi, Kadokura Akira, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Morioka Akira, Sato Yuka, et al.
Title: Relativistic electron precipitations in association with diffuse aurora: Conjugate observation of SAMPEX and the all sky TV camera at Syowa Station
Abstract: It has been believed that whistler mode waves can cause relativistic electron precipitations. It has been also pointed out that pitch angle scattering of ~keV electrons by whistler mode waves results in diffuse auroras. Thus, it is natural to expect relativistic electron precipitations associated with diffuse auroras. Based on a conjugate observation between the SAMPEX spacecraft and the all-sky TV camera at Syowa Station, we report, for the first time, a case in which relativistic electron precipitations are associated with diffuse aurora. The SAMPEX observation shows that the precipitations of >1 MeV electrons are well accompanied with those of >150 and >400 keV electrons. This indicates that electrons in the energy range from several keV to >1 MeV precipitate into the atmosphere s. . .
Date: 06/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064564 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064564
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Authors: Kubota Yuko, Omura Yoshiharu, Kletzing Craig, and Reeves Geoff
Title: Generation process of large-amplitude upper band chorus emissions observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We analyze large‐amplitude upper‐band chorus emissions measured near the magnetic equator by the EMFISIS (Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science) instrument package onboard the Van Allen Probes. In setting up the parameters of source electrons exciting the emissions based on theoretical analyses and observational results measured by the HOPE (Helium Oxygen Proton Electron) instrument, we calculate threshold and optimum amplitudes with the nonlinear wave growth theory. We find that the optimum amplitude is larger than the threshold amplitude obtained in the frequency range of the chorus emissions and that the wave amplitudes grow between the threshold and optimum amplitudes. In the frame of the wave growth process, the nonlinear growth rates are much greater. . .
Date: 04/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2017JA024782 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2017JA024782
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Authors: Kronberg E. A., Grigorenko E. E., Turner D. L., Daly P. W., Khotyaintsev Y., et al.
Title: Comparing and contrasting dispersionless injections at geosynchronous orbit during a substorm event
Abstract: Particle injections in the magnetosphere transport electrons and ions from the magnetotail to the radiation belts. Here we consider generation mechanisms of “dispersionless” injections, namely, those with simultaneous increase of the particle flux over a wide energy range. In this study we take advantage of multisatellite observations which simultaneously monitor Earth's magnetospheric dynamics from the tail toward the radiation belts during a substorm event. Dispersionless injections are associated with instabilities in the plasma sheet during the growth phase of the substorm, with a dipolarization front at the onset and with magnetic flux pileup during the expansion phase. They show different spatial spread and propagation characteristics. Injection associated with the dipolarization. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023551 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023551/full
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Authors: Kress B T, Hudson M K, Looper M D, Albert J, Lyon J G, et al.
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement
Abstract: [1] Prior to 2003, there are two known cases where ultrarelativistic (≳10 MeV) electrons appeared in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts in association with high speed interplanetary shocks: the 24 March 1991 and the less well studied 21 February 1994 storms. During the March 1991 event electrons were injected well into the inner zone on a timescale of minutes, producing a new stably trapped radiation belt population that persisted for ∼10 years. More recently, at the end of solar cycle 23, a number of violent geomagnetic disturbances resulted in large variations in ultrarelativistic electrons in the inner zone, indicating that these events are less rare than previously thought. Here we present results from a numerical study of shock-induced transport and energization of outer zone . . .
Date: 09/2007 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research DOI: 10.1029/2006JA012218 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006JA012218/abstract
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Authors: KRESS B, Hudson M K, LOOPER M, LYON J, and GOODRICH C
Title: Global MHD test particle simulations of solar energetic electron trapping in the Earth’s radiation belts
Abstract: Test-particle trajectories are computed in fields from a global MHD magnetospheric model simulation of the 29 October 2003 Storm Commencement to investigate trapping and transport of solar energetic electrons (SEEs) in the magnetosphere during severe storms. SEEs are found to provide a source population for a newly formed belt of View the MathML source electrons in the Earth's inner zone radiation belts, which was observed following the 29 October 2003 storm. Energy and pitch angle distributions of the new belt are compared with results previously obtained [Kress, B.T., Hudson, M.K., Looper, M.D., Albert, J., Lyon, J.G., Goodrich, C.C., 2007. Global MHD test particle simulations of >10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, A0921. . .
Date: 11/2008 Publisher: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Pages: 1727 - 1737 DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2008.05.018 Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682608001338
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Authors: Kress B T, Hudson M K, and Paral J.
Title: Rebuilding of the Earth's outer electron belt during 8-10 October 2012
Abstract: Geomagnetic storms often include strong magnetospheric convection caused by sustained periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field. During periods of strong convection, the Alfvén layer, which separates the region of sunward convection from closed drift shells, is displaced earthward allowing plasma sheet particles with energies in the hundreds of keV direct access inside of geosynchronous. Subsequent outward motion of the Alfvén boundary and adiabatic energization during storm recovery traps plasma sheet electrons on closed drift shells providing a seed population for the outer radiation belts. In situ observations of the 8–10 October 2012 geomagnetic storm and MHD test particle simulations illustrate the morphology of this process. Data and modeling results support the conclusi. . .
Date: 02/2014 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 749 - 754 DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058588 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013GL058588
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Authors: Korotova G. I., Sibeck D G, Tahakashi K., Dai L., Spence H E, et al.
Title: Van Allen Probe observations of drift-bounce resonances with Pc 4 pulsations and wave–particle interactions in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We present Van Allen Probe B observations of azimuthally limited, antisymmetric, poloidal Pc 4 electric and magnetic field pulsations in the pre-midnight sector of the magnetosphere from 05:40 to 06:00 UT on 1 May 2013. Oscillation periods were similar for the magnetic and electric fields and proton fluxes. The flux of energetic protons exhibited an energy-dependent response to the pulsations. Energetic proton variations were anticorrelated at medium and low energies. Although we attribute the pulsations to a drift-bounce resonance, we demonstrate that the energy-dependent response of the ion fluxes results from pulsation-associated velocities sweeping energy-dependent radial ion flux gradients back and forth past the spacecraft.
Date: 01/2015 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 955 - 964 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-33-955-2015 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/33/955/2015/angeo-33-955-2015.pdf
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Authors: Kletzing Craig A.
Title: Progress on understanding chorus emissions from data of the electric and magnetic field instrument suite and integrated science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A key wave-particle interaction important to both acceleration and loss in the radiation belts is the of whistler-mode chorus interacting with energetic electrons. To measure this important radiation belt interaction, the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission utilizes one of the most complete sets of measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnet. . .
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/URSIGASS.2014.6929872 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6929872
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Authors: Kletzing C. A.
Title: Recent results from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer. . .
Date: 01/2014 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/USNC-URSI-NRSM.2014.6928090 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6928090
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Authors: Kletzing C A, Kurth W S, Acuna M, MacDowall R J, Torbert R B, et al.
Title: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on RBSP
Abstract: The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation on the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (now named the Van Allen Probes) mission provides key wave and very low frequency magnetic field measurements to understand radiation belt acceleration, loss, and transport. The key science objectives and the contribution that EMFISIS makes to providing measurements as well as theory and modeling are described. The key components of the instruments suite, both electronics and sensors, including key functional parameters, calibration, and performance, demonstrate that EMFISIS provides the needed measurements for the science of the RBSP mission. The EMFISIS operational modes and data products, along with online availability and data tools provide the radiation bel. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews DOI: 10.1007/s11214-013-9993-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9993-6
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Authors: Kistler L.M., Mouikis C. G., Spence H.E., Menz A.M., Skoug R.M., et al.
Title: The Source of O + in the Storm-time Ring Current
Abstract: A stretched and compressed geomagnetic field occurred during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm on 1 June 2013. During the storm the Van Allen Probes spacecraft made measurements of the plasma sheet boundary layer, and observed large fluxes of O+ ions streaming up the field line from the nightside auroral region. Prior to the storm main phase there was an increase in the hot (>1 keV) and more isotropic O+ions in the plasma sheet. In the spacecraft inbound pass through the ring current region during the storm main phase, the H+ and O+ ions were significantly enhanced. We show that this enhanced inner magnetosphere ring current population is due to the inward adiabatic convection of the plasma sheet ion population. The energy range of the O+ ion plasma sheet that impacts the ring curren. . .
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA022204 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA022204
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Fretz Kristin, Goldsten John, and Maurer Richard
Title: Successes and challenges of operating the Van Allen Probes mission in the radiation belts
Abstract: The Van Allen probes team has been successful in monitoring and trending the performance of the mission to date. However, operating two spacecraft in the Van Allen radiation belts poses a number of challenges and requires careful monitoring of spacecraft performance due to the high radiation environment and potential impact on the mostly single string electronics architecture. Spacecraft and instrument telemetry trending is tracked with internal peer reviews conducted twice a year by the operations and engineering teams. On board radiation monitoring sensors are used to evaluate total dose accumulated on board the spacecraft and to assess potential impacts. Single event upsets are tracked and high activity events are logged and analyzed. Anomalous data is compared to radiation and solar ev. . .
Date: 03/2015 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2015.7119179 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=7119179
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Authors: Kirby Karen, and Stratton Jim
Title: Van Allen Probes: Successful launch campaign and early operations exploring Earth's radiation belts
Abstract: The twin Van Allen Probe observatories developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's Heliophysics Division completed final observatory integration and environmental test activities and were successfully launched into orbit around the Earth on August 30, 2012. As the science operations phase begins, the mission is providing exciting new information about the impact of radiation belt activity on the earth. The on-board boom mounted magnetometers and other instruments are the most sensitive sensors of their type that have ever flown in the Van Allen radiation belts. The observatories are producing near-Earth space weather information that can be used to provide warnings of potential power grid interruptions or satellite damaging storms. The Van Allen Probes a. . .
Date: 03/2013 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2013.6496838 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/lpdocs/epic03/wrapper.htm?arnumber=6496838
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Artis David, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probes—Observatory and Environments
Abstract: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission that launched August 30, 2012, and is the latest science mission in NASA’s Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, as well as the influence of the Sun on the Earth’s environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning observatories in an elliptical orbit around earth with 600 km perigee, 30,000 km apogee and 10∘ inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin RBSP observatories (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) wil. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 59-125 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9949-2 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9949-2
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Authors: Kirby Karen, Bushman Stewart, Butler Michael, Conde Rich, Fretz Kristen, et al.
Title: Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design
Abstract: NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning spacecraft in an elliptical orbit around earth from 600 km perigee to 30,000 km apogee at 10 degree inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin spacecraft will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other 4 times per year; this offers simultaneous meas. . .
Date: 03/2012 Publisher: IEEE DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020 Available at: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06187020
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Authors: Kim Jin-Hee, Lee Dae-Young, Cho Jung-Hee, Shin Dae-Kyu, Kim Kyung-Chan, et al.
Title: A prediction model for the global distribution of whistler chorus wave amplitude developed separately for two latitudinal zones
Abstract: Whistler mode chorus waves are considered to play a central role in accelerating and scattering electrons in the outer radiation belt. While in situ measurements are usually limited to the trajectories of a small number of satellites, rigorous theoretical modeling requires a global distribution of chorus wave characteristics. In the present work, by using a large database of chorus wave observations made on the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites for about 5 years, we develop prediction models for a global distribution of chorus amplitudes. The development is based on two main components: (a) the temporal dependence of average chorus amplitudes determined by correlating with the preceding solar wind and geomagnetic conditions as represented by t. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020900 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020900
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Authors: Kim Hyomin, Gerrard Andrew J., Lanzerotti Louis J., Soto-Chavez Rualdo, Cohen Ross J., et al.
Title: Ring Current He-Ion Control by Bounce Resonant ULF Waves
Abstract: Ring current energy He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV) differential flux data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft show considerable variability during quiet solar wind and geomagnetic time periods. Such variability is apparent from orbit to orbit (∼9 hours) of the spacecraft and is observed to be ∼50–100% of the nominal flux. Using data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument, also aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, we identify that a dominant source of this variability is from ULF waveforms with periods of 10's of sec. These periods correspond to the bounce resonant timescales of the ring current He-ions being measured by RBSPICE. A stat. . .
Date: 09/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA023958 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA023958/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung-Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Dependence of the amplitude of magnetosonic waves on the solar wind and AE index using Van Allen Probes
Abstract: We present the dependence of the magnetosonic wave amplitudes both outside and inside the plasmapause on the solar wind and AE index using Van Allen Probe-A spacecraft during the time period of 1 October 2012 to 31 December 2015, based on a correlation and regression analysis. Solar wind parameters considered are the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF BS), solar wind number density (NSW), and bulk speed (VSW). We find that the wave amplitudes outside (inside) the plasmapause are well correlated with the preceding AE, IMF BS, and NSW with time delays, each corresponding to 2–3 h (3–4 h), 4–5 h (3–4 h), and 2–3 h (8–9 h), while the correlation with VSW is ambiguous both inside and outside the plasmapause. As measured by the correlation coefficient, the IMF BS is the mos. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024094 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024094/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung‐Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Statistical Analysis of Hiss Waves in Plasmaspheric Plumes Using Van Allen Probe Observations
Abstract: Plasmaspheric hiss waves commonly observed in high‐density regions in the Earth's magnetosphere are known to be one of the main contributors to the loss of radiation belt electrons. There has been a lot of effort to investigate the distributions of hiss waves in the plasmasphere, while relatively little attention has been given to those in the plasmaspheric plume. In this study, we present for the first time a statistical analysis of the occurrence and the spatial distribution of wave amplitudes and wave normal angles for hiss waves in plumes using Van Allen Probes observations during the period of October 2012 to December 2016. Statistical results show that a wide range of hiss wave amplitudes in plumes from a few picotesla to >100 pT is observed, but a modest (<20 pT) wave amplitude is. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1904 - 1915 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026458 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026458
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Authors: Kim Kyung-Chan, and Shprits Yuri
Title: Survey of the Favorable Conditions for Magnetosonic Wave Excitation
Abstract: The ratio of the proton ring velocity (VR) to the local Alfven speed (VA), in addition to proton ring distributions, plays a key factor in the excitation of magnetosonic waves at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency fcp and the lower hybrid resonance frequency fLHR in the Earth's magnetosphere. Here we investigate whether there is a statistically significant relationship between occurrences of proton rings and magnetosonic waves both outside and inside the plasmapause using particle and wave data from Van Allen Probe-A during the time period of October 2012 to December 2015. We also perform a statistical survey of the ratio of the ring energy (ER, corresponding to VR) to the Alfven energy (EA, corresponding to VA) to determine the favorable conditions under which magnetosonic. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024865 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024865/full
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Authors: Kim Kyung-Chan, and Lee Dae-Young
Title: Magnetopause structure favorable for radiation belt electron loss
Abstract: Magnetopause shadowing is regarded as one of the major reasons for the loss of relativistic radiation belt electrons, although this has not yet been fully validated by observations. Previous simulations on this process assumed that all of the electrons encountering the magnetopause are simply lost into the magnetosheath just as ring current ions can be and did not examine details of the particle dynamics across and inside the magnetopause which has a finite thickness. In this paper, we perform test particle orbit calculations based on a simplified one-dimensional magnetopause model to demonstrate specifically how relativistic electrons arriving at the prenoon side of the magnetopause can be lost. The calculation results indicate that the loss process is determined by two factors: (i) a gra. . .
Date: 07/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 5495 - 5508 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA019880 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019880
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Authors: Kim S.-I., Kim K.-H., Kwon H.-J., Jin H., Lee E., et al.
Title: SC-associated electric field variations in the magnetosphere and ionospheric convective flows
Abstract: We examine magnetic and electric field perturbations associated with a sudden commencement (SC), caused by an interplanetary (IP) shock passing over the Earth's magnetosphere on 16 February 2013. The SC was identified in the magnetic and electric field data measured at THEMIS-E (THE-E: MLT = 12.4, L = 6.3), Van Allen Probe-A (VAP-A: MLT = 3.2, L = 5.1), and Van Allen Probe-B (VAP-B: MLT = 0.2. L= 4.9) in the magnetosphere. During the SC interval, THE-E observed a dawnward-then-duskward electric (E) field perturbation around noon, while VAP-B observed a duskward E-field perturbation around midnight. VAP-A observed a dawnward-then-duskward E-field perturbation in the postmidnight sector, but the duration and magnitude of the dawnward E-perturbation are much shorter and weaker than that at TH. . .
Date: 10/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024611 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024611/full
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Hietala H., Turner D. L., Koskinen H. E. J., Pulkkinen T. I., et al.
Title: Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response
Abstract: We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined. . .
Date: 04/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL063542
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Authors: Kilpua E. K. J., Turner D. L., Jaynes A. N., Hietala H., Koskinen H. E. J., et al.
Title: Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt Response to Interacting Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections
Abstract: We study the response of the outer Van Allen radiation belt during an intense magnetic storm on 15–22 February 2014. Four interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at Earth, of which the three last ones were interacting. Using data from the Van Allen Probes, we report the first detailed investigation of electron fluxes from source (tens of kiloelectron volts) to core (megaelectron volts) energies and possible loss and acceleration mechanisms as a response to substructures (shock, sheath and ejecta, and regions of shock‐compressed ejecta) in multiple interacting ICMEs. After an initial enhancement induced by a shock compression of the magnetosphere, core fluxes strongly depleted and stayed low for 4 days. This sustained depletion can be related to a sequence of ICME substruc. . .
Date: 03/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 1927 - 1947 DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026238 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026238
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Authors: Khoo Leng Ying, Li Xinlin, Zhao Hong, Sarris Theodore, Xiang Zheng, et al.
Title: On the Initial Enhancement of Energetic Electrons and the Innermost Plasmapause Locations: CME-Driven Storm Periods
Abstract: Using Van Allen Probes’ observations and established plasmapause location (Lpp) models, we investigate the relationship between the location of the initial enhancement (IE) of energetic electrons and the innermost (among all magnetic local time sectors) Lpp over five intense storm periods. Our study reveals that the IE events for 30 keV to 2MeV electrons always occurred outside of the innermost Lpp. On average, the inner extent of the IE events (LIE) for <800 keV electrons was closer to the innermost Lpp when compared to the LIE for >800 keV electrons that was found consistently at ~1.5 RE outside of the innermost Lpp. The IE of 10s keV electrons was observed before the IE of 100s keV electrons, and the IE of >800 keV electrons was observed on average 12.6±2.3 hours after the occurrence. . .
Date: 10/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026074 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026074
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Authors: Khazanov G. V., Boardsen S., Krivorutsky E. N., Engebretson M. J., Sibeck D., et al.
Title: Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B
Abstract: We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth . . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022814 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022814
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Authors: Khazanov K. G. V., Sibeck D. G., Tel'nikhin A. A., and Kronberg T. K.
Title: Spectra of keV protons related to ion-cyclotron wave packets
Abstract: We use the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation to study the statistical aspects of stochastic dynamics of the radiation belt (RB) protons driven by nonlinear electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) wave packets. We obtain the spectra of keV protons scattered by these waves that show steeping near the gyroresonance, the signature of resonant wave-particle interaction that cannot be described by a simple power law. The most likely mechanism for proton precipitation events in RBs is shown to be nonlinear wave-particle interaction, namely, the scattering of RB protons into the loss cone by EMIC waves.
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4973323 Available at: http://http://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4973323
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Authors: Khazanov G. V., Boardsen S., Krivorutsky E. N., Engebretson M. J., Sibeck D., et al.
Title: Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B
Abstract: We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth . . .
Date: 01/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 449 - 463 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022814 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022814/full
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Authors: Khazanov G. V., Tripathi A. K., Sibeck D., Himwich E., Glocer A., et al.
Title: Electron distribution function formation in regions of diffuse aurora
Abstract: The precipitation of high-energy magnetospheric electrons (E ∼ 600 eV–10 KeV) in the diffuse aurora contributes significant energy flux into the Earth's ionosphere. To fully understand the formation of this flux at the upper ionospheric boundary, ∼700–800 km, it is important to consider the coupled ionosphere-magnetosphere system. In the diffuse aurora, precipitating electrons initially injected from the plasma sheet via wave-particle interaction processes degrade in the atmosphere toward lower energies and produce secondary electrons via impact ionization of the neutral atmosphere. These precipitating electrons can be additionally reflected upward from the two conjugate ionospheres, leading to a series of multiple reflections through the magnetosphere. These reflections greatly in. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 9891–9915 DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021728 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021728http://api.wiley.com/onlinelibrary/tdm/v1/articles/10.1002%2F2015JA021728
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Authors: Khazanov G., Sibeck D., Tel'nikhin A., and Kronberg T.
Title: Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves
Abstract: We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ∼10 s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ∼tens of minutes.
Date: 08/2014 Publisher: Physics of Plasmas Pages: 082901 DOI: 10.1063/1.4892185 Available at: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/21/8/10.1063/1.4892185
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Authors: Kessel Mona
Title: Things we don't yet understand about solar driving of the radiation belts.
Abstract: This commentary explores how close we are to predicting the behavior of the radiations belts - the primary science objective of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Starting with what we know or think we know about competing sources, enhancement, transport, and loss, I walk through recent papers that have improved our understanding and then focus on flux dropouts as one particular yardstick of success. I mention a new paradigm for electrons and the importance of reliably matching models and observations for different solar inputs. Although the case for prediction remains a work in progress, there are encouraging signs of progress.
Date: 05/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022472 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022472
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Authors: Kessel R L, Fox N J, and Weiss M
Title: The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) and Space Weather
Abstract: Following the launch and commissioning of NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) in 2012, space weather data will be generated and broadcast from the spacecraft in near real-time. The RBSP mission targets one part of the space weather chain: the very high energy electrons and ions magnetically trapped within Earth’s radiation belts. The understanding gained by RBSP will enable us to better predict the response of the radiation belts to solar storms in the future, and thereby protect space assets in the near-Earth environment. This chapter details the presently planned RBSP capabilities for generating and broadcasting near real-time space weather data, discusses the data products, the ground stations collecting the data, and the users/models that will incorporate the data into test-b. . .
Date: 11/2013 Publisher: Space Science Reviews Pages: 531-543 DOI: 10.1007/s11214-012-9953-6 Available at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-012-9953-6
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Authors: Kersten Tobias, Horne Richard B, Glauert Sarah A, Meredith Nigel P, Fraser Brian J., et al.
Title: Electron losses from the radiation belts caused by EMIC waves
Abstract: Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves cause electron loss in the radiation belts by resonating with high-energy electrons at energies greater than about 500 keV. However, their effectiveness has not been fully quantified. Here we determine the effectiveness of EMIC waves by using wave data from the fluxgate magnetometer on CRRES to calculate bounce-averaged pitch angle and energy diffusion rates for L*=3.5–7 for five levels of Kp between 12 and 18 MLT. To determine the electron loss, EMIC diffusion rates were included in the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt Model together with whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and radial diffusion. By simulating a 100 day period in 1990, we show that EMIC waves caused a significant reduction in the electron flux for energies greater t. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020366 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020366
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Authors: Kennel C F
Title: Velocity Space Diffusion from Weak Plasma Turbulence in a Magnetic Field
Abstract: The quasi‐linear velocity space diffusion is considered for waves of any oscillation branch propagating at an arbitrary angle to a uniform magnetic field in a spatially uniform plasma. The space‐averaged distribution function is assumed to change slowly compared to a gyroperiod and characteristic times of the wave motion. Nonlinear mode coupling is neglected. An H‐like theorem shows that both resonant and nonresonant quasi‐linear diffusion force the particle distributions towards marginal stablity. Creation of the marginally stable state in the presence of a sufficiently broad wave spectrum in general involves diffusing particles to infinite energies, and so the marginally stable plateau is not accessible physically, except in special cases. Resonant particles with velocities much . . .
Date: 12/1966 Publisher: Physics of Fluids Pages: 2377 DOI: 10.1063/1.1761629 Available at: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pof1/9/12/10.1063/1.1761629
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Authors: Kennel C, and Petschek H
Title: Limit on Stably Trapped Particle Fluxes
Abstract: Whistler mode noise leads to electron pitch angle diffusion. Similarly, ion cyclotron noise couples to ions. This diffusion results in particle precipitation into the ionosphere and creates a pitch angle distributon of trapped particles that is unstable to further wave growth. Since excessive wave growth leads to rapid diffusion and particle loss, the requirement that the growth rate be limited to the rate at which wave energy is depleted by wave propagation permits an estimate of an upper limit to the trapped equatorial particle flux. Electron fluxes >40 kev and proton fluxes >120 kev observed on Explorers 14 and 12, respectively, obey this limit with occasional exceptions. Beyond L = 4, the fluxes are just below their limit, indicating that an unspecified acceleration source, sufficient . . .
Date: 01/1966 Publisher: Journal Geophysical Research Pages: 1-28 DOI: 10.1029/JZ071i001p00001 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JZ071i001p00001/full
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Authors: Kemp Brian L, McGee Timothy G, and Shankar Uday J
Title: Analysis of Spinning Spacecraft with Wire Booms Part 1: Derivation of Nonlinear Dynamics
Abstract: Algebraic expressions for the governing equations of motion are developed to describe a spinning spacecraft with flexible appendages. Two limiting cases are investigated: appendages that are self-restoring and appendages that require spacecraft motion to restore. Solar panels have sufficient root stiffness to self-restore perturbations. Radial wire antennae have little intrinsic root stiffness and require centripetal acceleration from spacecraft rotations to restore perturbations. External forces applied for attitude corrections can displace spacecraft appendages from their steady-state position. The Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) satellite is used as an example to explore numerical results for several maneuvers.
Date: 08/2009 Publisher: AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference DOI: 10.2514/6.2009-6202 Available at: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2009-6202
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Authors: Kellerman A. C., Shprits Y Y, Makarevich R. A., Spanswick E., Donovan E., et al.
Title: Characterization of the energy-dependent response of riometer absorption
Abstract: Ground based riometers provide an inexpensive means to continuously remote sense the precipitation of electrons in the dynamic auroral region of Earth's ionosphere. The energy-dependent relationship between riometer absorption and precipitating electrons is thus of great importance for understanding the loss of electrons from the Earth's magnetosphere. In this study, statistical and event-based analyses are applied to determine the energy of electrons to which riometers chiefly respond. Time-lagged correlation analysis of trapped to precipitating fluxes shows that daily averaged absorption best correlates with ~ 60 keV trapped electron flux at zero-time lag, although large variability is observed across different phases of the solar cycle. High-time resolution statistical cross-correlati. . .
Date: 11/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2014JA020027 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020027
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Authors: Keika Kunihiro, Seki Kanako, é Masahito, Machida Shinobu, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, et al.
Title: Storm time impulsive enhancements of energetic oxygen due to adiabatic acceleration of preexisting warm oxygen in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: We examine enhancements of energetic (>50 keV) oxygen ions observed by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on board the Van Allen Probes spacecraft in the inner magnetosphere (L ~ 6) at 22–23 h magnetic local time (MLT) during an injection event of the 6 June 2013 storm. Simultaneous observations by two Van Allen Probes spacecraft located close together (~0.5 RE) indicate that particle injections occurred in the premidnight sector (< ~24 h MLT). We also examine the evolution of the proton and oxygen energy spectra at L ~ 6 during the injection event. The spectral slope did not significantly change during the storm. The oxygen phase space density (PSD) was shifted toward higher PSD in a wide range of the first adiabatic invariant. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7739 - 7752 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022384 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022384
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Authors: Keika Kunihiro, Seki Kanako, é Masahito, Miyoshi Yoshizumi, Lanzerotti Louis J., et al.
Title: Three-Step Buildup of the 17 March 2015 Storm Ring Current: Implication for the Cause of the Unexpected Storm Intensification
Abstract: We examine the spatiotemporal variations of the energy density and the energy spectral evolution of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere during the main phase of the 17 March 2015 storm, using data from the RBSPICE and EMFISIS instruments onboard Van Allen Probes. The storm developed in response to two southward IMF intervals separated by about 3 h. In contrast to two steps seen in the Dst/SYM-H index, the ring current ion population evolved in three steps: the first subphase was apparently caused by the earlier southward IMF, and the subsequent subphases occurred during the later southward IMF period. Ion energy ranges that contribute to the ring current differed between the three subphases. We suggest that the spectral evolution resulted from the penetration of different plasma shee. . .
Date: 01/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024462 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2017JA024462/full
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Authors: Katsavrias C., Daglis I. A., Li W, Dimitrakoudis S., Georgiou M., et al.
Title: Combined effects of concurrent Pc5 and chorus waves on relativistic electron dynamics
Abstract: We present electron phase space density (PSD) calculations as well as concurrent Pc5 and chorus wave activity observations during two intense geomagnetic storms caused by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) resulting in contradicting net effect. We show that, during the 17 March 2013 storm, the coincident observation of chorus and relativistic electron enhancements suggests that the prolonged chorus wave activity seems to be responsible for the enhancement of the electron population in the outer radiation belt even in the presence of pronounced outward diffusion. On the other hand, the significant depletion of electrons, during the 12 September 2014 storm, coincides with long-lasting outward diffusion driven by the continuous enhanced Pc5 activity since chorus wave a. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Annales Geophysicae Pages: 1173 - 1181 DOI: 10.5194/angeo-33-1173-2015 Available at: http://www.ann-geophys.net/33/1173/2015/
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Authors: Kataoka Ryuho, Shiota Daikou, Kilpua Emilia, and Keika Kunihiro
Title: Pileup accident hypothesis of magnetic storm on 17 March 2015
Abstract: We propose a “pileup accident” hypothesis, based on the solar wind data analysis and magnetohydrodynamics modeling, to explain unexpectedly geoeffective solar wind structure which caused the largest magnetic storm so far during the solar cycle 24 on 17 March 2015: First, a fast coronal mass ejection with strong southward magnetic fields both in the sheath and in the ejecta was followed by a high-speed stream from a nearby coronal hole. This combination resulted in less adiabatic expansion than usual to keep the high speed, strong magnetic field, and high density within the coronal mass ejection. Second, preceding slow and high-density solar wind was piled up ahead of the coronal mass ejection just before the arrival at the Earth to further enhance its magnetic field and density. Finall. . .
Date: 07/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064816 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015GL064816
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Authors: Kanekal S G, Baker D N, Henderson M G, Li W, Fennell J. F., et al.
Title: Relativistic electron response to the combined magnetospheric impact of a coronal mass ejection overlapping with a high-speed stream: Van Allen Probes observations
Abstract: During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth.We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both MagEIS and REPT instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establishes the behavior of lower energy (<1MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations du. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021395 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021395
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Authors: Kanekal S G, Baker D N, Fennell J. F., Jones A., Schiller Q., et al.
Title: Prompt acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to ultrarelativistic energies by the 17 March 2015 interplanetary shock
Abstract: Trapped electrons in Earth's outer Van Allen radiation belt are influenced profoundly by solar phenomena such as high-speed solar wind streams, coronal mass ejections (CME), and interplanetary (IP) shocks. In particular, strong IP shocks compress the magnetosphere suddenly and result in rapid energization of electrons within minutes. It is believed that the electric fields induced by the rapid change in the geomagnetic field are responsible for the energization. During the latter part of March 2015, a CME impact led to the most powerful geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = −223 nT at 17 March, 23 UT) observed not only during the Van Allen Probe era but also the entire preceding decade. Magnetospheric response in the outer radiation belt eventually resulted in elevated levels of energized ele. . .
Date: 08/2016 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 7622 - 7635 DOI: 10.1002/2016JA022596 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA022596
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