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Authors: Xu Jiyao, He Zhaohai, Baker D.N., Roth Ilan, Wang C., et al.
Title: Characteristics of high energy proton responses to geomagnetic activities in the inner radiation belt observed by the RBSP satellite
Abstract: High energy trapped particles in the radiation belts constitute potential threats to the functionality of satellites as they enter into those regions. In the inner radiation belt, the characteristics of high‐energy (>20MeV) protons variations during geomagnetic activity times have been studied by implementing four‐year (2013‐2016) observations of the Van Allen probes. An empirical formula has been used to remove the satellite orbit effect, by which proton fluxes have been normalized to the geomagnetic equator. Case studies show that the region of L<1.7 is relatively stable, while L>1.7 is more dynamic and the most significant variation of proton fluxes occurs at L=2.0. The four‐year survey at L=2.0 indicates that for every geomagnetic storm, sharp descent in proton fluxes is accomp. . .
Date: 05/2019 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026205 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA026205
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Authors: Xiongdong Yu, Zhigang Yuan, Dedong Wang, Shiyong Huang, Haimeng Li, et al.
Title: Oxygen cyclotron harmonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: Fine structured multiple-harmonic electromagnetic emissions at frequencies around the equatorial oxygen cyclotron harmonics are observed by Van Allen Probe A outside the core plasmasphere (L~5) off the magnetic equator (MLAT~-7.5°) during a magnetic storm. We find that the multiple-harmonic emissions have their PSD peaks at 2~8 equatorial oxygen gyro-harmonics (f~nfO+, n=2~8) while the fundamental mode (n=1) is absent, implying that the harmonic waves are generated near the equator and propagate into the observation region. Additionally these electromagnetic emissions are linear polarized. Different from the equatorial noise emission propagating very obliquely, these emissions have moderate wave normal angles (about 40°~60°) which predominately become larger as the harmonic number incre. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Science China: Earth Sciences DOI: 10.1007/s11430-016-9024-3 Available at: http://engine.scichina.com/publisher/scp/journal/SCES/doi/10.1007/s11430-016-9024-3
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Authors: Xiong Ying, Xie Lun, Chen Lunjin, Ni Binbin, Fu Suiyan, et al.
Title: The Response of the Energy Content of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms
Abstract: Using the data from the Van Allen Probe‐A spacecraft, the variability of the total outer radiation belt (2.5300 keV) is investigated for the first time during 51 isolated storms spanning from October 2012 to May 2017. The statistical results show that the TRBEEC exhibits no‐change in 20% of the storms and gets enhanced during 80% of them. The sub‐relativistic electrons (300‐500 keV) and relativistic electrons (0.5‐2.0 MeV) equally contribute to the TRBEEC during the main phases, while in the recovery phases, the relativistic electrons contribute up to 80% of the TRBEEC. The results of the superposed epoch analysis of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices indicate that the TRBEEC enhancement events prefe. . .
Date: 09/2018 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1029/2018JA025475 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018JA025475
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Authors: Xiong Ying, Chen Lunjin, Xie Lun, Fu Suiyan, Xia Zhiyang, et al.
Title: Relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distribution modulated by localized background magnetic field perturbation driven by hot ring current ions
Abstract: Dayside modulated relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distributions (PADs) from ∼200 keV to 2.6 MeV were observed by Van Allen Probe B at L = 5.3 on 15 November 2013. They were associated with localized magnetic dip driven by hot ring current ion (60–100 keV proton and 60–200 keV helium and oxygen) injections. We reproduce the electron's butterfly PADs at satellite's location using test particle simulation. The simulation results illustrate that a negative radial flux gradient contributes primarily to the formation of the modulated electron's butterfly PADs through inward transport due to the inductive electric field, while deceleration due to the inductive electric field and pitch angle change also makes in part contribution. We suggest that localized magnetic field pertur. . .
Date: 05/2017 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2017GL072558 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL072558/full
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Authors: Xiong Ying, Xie Lun, Pu Zuyin, Fu Suiyan, Chen Lunjin, et al.
Title: Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms
Abstract: Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3–2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5–14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such “energy-dependent” responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examin. . .
Date: 11/2015 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 9513–9523 DOI: 10.1002/2015JA021440 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015JA021440/full
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Liu Si, Tao Xin, Su Zhenpeng, Zhou Qinghua, et al.
Title: Generation of extremely low frequency chorus in Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Recent studies have shown that chorus can efficiently accelerate the outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. Chorus, previously often observed above 0.1 equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce, was generated by energetic electrons originating from Earth's plasma sheet. Chorus below 0.1 fce has seldom been reported until the recent data from Van Allen Probes, but its origin has not been revealed so far. Because electron resonant energy can approach the relativistic level at extremely low frequency, relativistic effects should be considered in the formula for whistler mode wave growth rate. Here we report high-resolution observations during the 14 October 2014 small storm and firstly demonstrate, using a fully relativistic simulation, that electrons with the high-energy tail p. . .
Date: 03/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023561 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023561
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, Su Zhenpeng, Zhou Qinghua, He Zhaoguo, et al.
Title: Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons
Abstract: Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosoni. . .
Date: 05/2015 Publisher: Nature Communications Pages: 8590 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9590 Available at: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms9590
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Zhou Qinghua, He Yihua, Yang Chang, Liu Si, et al.
Title: Penetration of magnetosonic waves into the plasmasphere observed by the Van Allen Probes
Abstract: During the small storm on 14–15 April 2014, Van Allen Probe A measured a continuously distinct proton ring distribution and enhanced magnetosonic (MS) waves along its orbit outside the plasmapause. Inside the plasmasphere, strong MS waves were still present but the distinct proton ring distribution was falling steeply with distance. We adopt a sum of subtracted bi-Maxwellian components to model the observed proton ring distribution and simulate the wave trajectory and growth. MS waves at first propagate toward lower L shells outside the plasmasphere, with rapidly increasing path gains related to the continuous proton ring distribution. The waves then gradually cross the plasmapause into the deep plasmasphere, with almost unchanged path gains due to the falling proton ring distribution an. . .
Date: 09/2015 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065745 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2015GL065745/full
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Zhou Qinghua, Su Zhenpeng, He Zhaoguo, Yang Chang, et al.
Title: Explaining occurrences of auroral kilometric radiation in Van Allen radiation belts
Abstract: Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is a strong terrestrial radio emission and dominates at higher latitudes because of reflection in vicinities of the source cavity and plasmapause. Recently, Van Allen Probes have observed occurrences of AKR emission in the equatorial region of Earth's radiation belts but its origin still remains an open question. Equatorial AKR can produce efficient acceleration of radiation belt electrons and is a risk to space weather. Here we report high-resolution observations during two small storm periods 4–6 April and 18–20 May 2013 and show, using a 3-D ray tracing simulation, that AKR can propagate downward all the way into the equatorial plane in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions. The simulated results can successfully explain the observed AKR. . .
Date: 12/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters Pages: 11,971 - 11,978 DOI: 10.1002/2016GL071728 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071728/full
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Authors: Xiao Fuliang, Yang Chang, He Zhaoguo, Su Zhenpeng, Zhou Qinghua, et al.
Title: Chorus acceleration of radiation belt relativistic electrons during March 2013 geomagnetic storm
Abstract: The recent launching of Van Allen probes provides an unprecedent opportunity to investigate variations of the radiation belt relativistic electrons. During the 17–19 March 2013 storm, the Van Allen probes simultaneously detected strong chorus waves and substantial increases in fluxes of relativistic (2 − 4.5 MeV) electrons around L = 4.5. Chorus waves occurred within the lower band 0.1–0.5fce (the electron equatorial gyrofrequency), with a peak spectral density ∼10−4 nT2/Hz. Correspondingly, relativistic electron fluxes increased by a factor of 102–103 during the recovery phase compared to the main phase levels. By means of a Gaussian fit to the observed chorus spectra, the drift and bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients are calculated and then used to solve a 2-D Fokker-Planc. . .
Date: 05/2014 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Pages: 3325 - 3332 DOI: 10.1002/2014JA019822 Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA019822
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Authors: Xiang Zheng, Tu Weichao, Ni Binbin, Henderson M G, and Cao Xing
Title: A Statistical Survey of Radiation Belt Dropouts Observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: A statistical analysis on the radiation belt dropouts is performed based on 4 years of electron phase space density data from the Van Allen Probes. The μ, K, and L* dependence of dropouts and their driving mechanisms and geomagnetic and solar wind conditions are investigated using electron phase space density data sets for the first time. Our results suggest that electronmagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering is the dominant dropout mechanism at low L* region, which requires the most active geomagnetic and solar wind conditions. In contrast, dropouts at high L* have a higher occurrence and are due to a combination of EMIC wave scattering and outward radial diffusion associated with magnetopause shadowing. In addition, outward radial diffusion at high L* is found to cause larger dro. . .
Date: 08/2018 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078907 Available at: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL078907
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Authors: Xiang Zheng, Tu Weichao, Li Xinlin, Ni Binbin, Morley S. K., et al.
Title: Understanding the Mechanisms of Radiation Belt Dropouts Observed by Van Allen Probes
Abstract: To achieve a better understanding of the dominant loss mechanisms for the rapid dropouts of radiation belt electrons, three distinct radiation belt dropout events observed by Van Allen Probes are comprehensively investigated. For each event, observations of the pitch angle distribution of electron fluxes and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are analyzed to determine the effects of atmospheric precipitation loss due to pitch angle scattering induced by EMIC waves. Last closed drift shells (LCDS) and magnetopause standoff position are obtained to evaluate the effects of magnetopause shadowing loss. Evolution of electron phase space density (PSD) versus L* profiles and the μ and K (first and second adiabatic invariants) dependence of the electron PSD drops are calculated to further. . .
Date: 08/2017 Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics DOI: 10.1002/2017JA024487 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024487/full
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Authors: Xia Zhiyang, Chen Lunjin, Dai Lei, Claudepierre Seth G., Chan Anthony A, et al.
Title: Modulation of chorus intensity by ULF waves deep in the inner magnetosphere
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that chorus wave intensity can be modulated by Pc4-Pc5 compressional ULF waves. In this study, we present Van Allen Probes observation of ULF wave modulating chorus wave intensity, which occurred deep in the magnetosphere. The ULF wave shows fundamental poloidal mode signature and mirror mode compressional nature. The observed ULF wave can modulate not only the chorus wave intensity but also the distribution of both protons and electrons. Linear growth rate analysis shows consistence with observed chorus intensity variation at low frequency (f <∼ 0.3fce), but cannot account for the observed higher-frequency chorus waves, including the upper band chorus waves. This suggests the chorus waves at higher-frequency ranges require nonlinear mechanisms. In addition, w. . .
Date: 09/2016 Publisher: Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2016GL070280 Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2016GL070280/full
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