Whistler Anisotropy Instabilities as the Source of Banded Chorus: Van Allen Probes Observations and Particle-in-Cell Simulations

TitleWhistler Anisotropy Instabilities as the Source of Banded Chorus: Van Allen Probes Observations and Particle-in-Cell Simulations
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsFu, X, Cowee, MM, Friedel, RH, Funsten, HO, S. Gary, P, Hospodarsky, GB, Kletzing, C, Kurth, W, Larsen, BA, Liu, K, MacDonald, EA, Min, K, Reeves, GD, Skoug, RM, Winske, D
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume119
Start Page8288
Issue10
Date Published10/2014
KeywordsChorus; HOPE; particle-in-cell simulation; Van Allen Probes
AbstractMagnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from HOPE instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper-band chorus, and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower-band chorus; the gap at ∼ Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.
URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020364
DOI10.1002/2014JA020364
Short TitleJ. Geophys. Res. Space Physics


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