Van Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms

TitleVan Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsLiu, S, Xiao, F, Yang, C, He, Y, Zhou, Q, Kletzing, CA, Kurth, WS, Hospodarsky, GB, Spence, HE, Reeves, GD, Funsten, HO, Blake, JB, Baker, DN, Wygant, JR
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Date Published01/2015
KeywordsVan Allen Probes, magnetopause
AbstractDuring 18 February to 2 March 2014, the Van Allen Probes encountered multiple geomagnetic storms and simultaneously observed intensified chorus and hiss waves. During this period, there were substantial enhancements in fluxes of energetic (53.8 − 108.3 keV) and relativistic (2 − 3.6 MeV) electrons. Chorus waves were excited at locations L = 4 − 6.2 after the fluxes of energetic were greatly enhanced, with a lower frequency band and wave amplitudes ∼ 20 − 100 pT. Strong hiss waves occurred primarily in the main phases or below the location L = 4 in the recovery phases. Relativistic electron fluxes decreased in the main phases due to the adiabatic (e.g., the magnetopause shadowing) or non-adiabatic (hiss-induced scattering) processes. In the recovery phases, relativistic electron fluxes either increased in the presence of enhanced chorus, or remained unchanged in the absence of strong chorus or hiss. The observed relativistic electron phase space density peaked around L∗ = 4.5, characteristic of local acceleration. This multiple-storm period reveals a typical picture that chorus waves are excited by the energetic electrons at first and then produce efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons. This further demonstrates that the interplay between both competing mechanisms of chorus-driven acceleration and hiss-driven scattering often occurs in the outer radiation belts.
URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2014JA020781
DOI10.1002/2014JA020781
Short TitleJ. Geophys. Res. Space Physics


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