Statistical characteristic of EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

TitleStatistical characteristic of EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsWang, D, Yuan, Z, Yu, X, Deng, X, Zhou, M, Huang, S, Li, H, Wang, Z, Qiao, Z, Kletzing, CA, Wygant, JR
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Date Published05/2015
Keywordsdistribution; EMIC waves; plasmasphere; Van Allen Probes
AbstractUtilizing the data from the magnetometer instrument which is a part of the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument suite onboard the Van Allen Probe A from Sep. 2012 to Apr. 2014, when the apogee of the satellite has passed all the MLT sectors, we obtain the statistical distribution characteristic of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere over all local times from L=3 to L=6. Compared with the previous statistical results about EMIC waves, the occurrence rates of EMIC waves distribute relatively uniform in the MLT sectors in lower L-shells. On the other hand, in higher L-shells, there are indeed some peaks of the occurrence rate for the EMIC waves, especially in the noon, dusk and night sectors. EMIC waves appear at lower L-shells in the dawn sector than in other sectors. In the lower L-shells (L<4), the occurrence rates of EMIC waves are significant in the dawn sector. This phenomenon may result from the distribution characteristic of the plasmasphere. The location of the plasmapause is usually lower in the dawn sector than that in other sectors, and the plasmapause is considered to be the favored region for the generation of EMIC waves. In higher L-shells (L>4) the occurrence rates of EMIC waves are most significant in the dusk sector, implying the important role of the plasmapause or plasmaspheric plume in generating EMIC waves. We have also investigated the distribution characteristics of the hydrogen band and the helium band EMIC waves. Surprisingly, in the inner magnetosphere, the hydrogen band EMIC waves occur more frequently than the helium band EMIC waves. Both them have peaks of occurrence rate in noon, dusk and night sectors, and the hydrogen band EMIC waves have more obvious peaks than the helium band EMIC waves in the night sector, while the helium band EMIC waves are more concentrated than the hydrogen band EMIC waves in the dusk sector. Both them occur significantly in the noon sector, which implies the important role of the solar wind dynamic pressure.
URLhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JA021089
DOI10.1002/2015JA021089
Short TitleJ. Geophys. Res. Space Physics


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