Oblique Whistler-Mode Waves in the Earth’s Inner Magnetosphere: Energy Distribution, Origins, and Role in Radiation Belt Dynamics

TitleOblique Whistler-Mode Waves in the Earth’s Inner Magnetosphere: Energy Distribution, Origins, and Role in Radiation Belt Dynamics
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsArtemyev, A, Agapitov, O, Mourenas, D, Krasnoselskikh, V, Shastun, ii, V, Mozer, F
JournalSpace Science Reviews
Volume200
Start Page261
Issue1-4
Pagination261 - 355
Date Published04/2016
ISSN0038-6308
KeywordsEarth radiation belts; Van Allen Probes; wave-particle interaction; Whistler waves
AbstractIn this paper we review recent spacecraft observations of oblique whistler-mode waves in the Earth’s inner magnetosphere as well as the various consequences of the presence of such waves for electron scattering and acceleration. In particular, we survey the statistics of occurrences and intensity of oblique chorus waves in the region of the outer radiation belt, comprised between the plasmapause and geostationary orbit, and discuss how their actual distribution may be explained by a combination of linear and non-linear generation, propagation, and damping processes. We further examine how such oblique wave populations can be included into both quasi-linear diffusion models and fully nonlinear models of wave-particle interaction. On this basis, we demonstrate that varying amounts of oblique waves can significantly change the rates of particle scattering, acceleration, and precipitation into the atmosphere during quiet times as well as in the course of a storm. Finally, we discuss possible generation mechanisms for such oblique waves in the radiation belts. We demonstrate that oblique whistler-mode chorus waves can be considered as an important ingredient of the radiation belt system and can play a key role in many aspects of wave-particle resonant interactions.
URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-016-0252-5
DOI10.1007/s11214-016-0252-5
Short TitleSpace Sci Rev


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