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2021

Electromagnetic power of lightning superbolts from Earth to space

Lightning superbolts are the most powerful and rare lightning events with intense optical emission, first identified from space. Superbolt events occurred in 2010-2018 could be localized by extracting the high energy tail of the lightning stroke signals measured by the very low frequency ground stations of the World-Wide Lightning Location Network. Here, we report electromagnetic observations of superbolts from space using Van Allen Probes satellite measurements, and ground measurements, and with two events measured both fro ...

Ripoll, J.-F.; Farges, T.; Malaspina, D.; Cunningham, G.; Lay, E.; Hospodarsky, G.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J.;

YEAR: 2021     DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23740-6

Van Allen Probes

2020

Analysis of Electric and Magnetic Lightning-Generated Wave Amplitudes Measured by the Van Allen Probes

Abstract We provide a statistical analysis of both electric and magnetic field wave amplitudes of very low frequency lightning-generated waves (LGWs) based on the equivalent of 11.5 years of observations made by the Van Allen Probes encompassing ~24.6 × 106 survey mode measurements. We complement this analysis with data from the ground-based World Wide Lightning Location Network to explore differences between satellite and ground-based measurements. LGW mean amplitudes are found to be low compared with other whistler mod ...

Ripoll, J.-F.; Farges, T.; Malaspina, D.; Lay, E.; Cunningham, G.; Hospodarsky, G.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J.;

YEAR: 2020     DOI: 10.1029/2020GL087503

lightning-generated waves; electric wave power; magnetic wave power; WWLLN database; Radiation belts; Van Allen Probes

2019

Local and Statistical Maps of Lightning-Generated Wave Power Density Estimated at the Van Allen Probes Footprints From the World-Wide Lightning Location Network Database

We propose a new method that uses the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) to estimate both the local and the drift lightning power density at the Van Allen Probes footprints during 4.3 years (~2 \texttimes 108 strokes.). The ratio of the drift power density to the local power density defines a time-resolved WWLLN-based model of lightning-generated wave (LGW) power density ratio, RWWLLN. RWWLLNis computed every ~34 s. This ratio multiplied by the time-resolved LGW intensity measured by the Probes allows direct compu ...

Ripoll, J.-F.; Farges, T.; Lay, E.; Cunningham, G.;

YEAR: 2019     DOI: 10.1029/2018GL081146

drift wave power density; lightning power density; lightning-generated waves; occurrence rate; Radiation belts; Van Allen Probes; WWLLN database



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