Bibliography



Found 5 entries in the Bibliography.


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2019

Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt Response to Interacting Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

We study the response of the outer Van Allen radiation belt during an intense magnetic storm on 15\textendash22 February 2014. Four interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at Earth, of which the three last ones were interacting. Using data from the Van Allen Probes, we report the first detailed investigation of electron fluxes from source (tens of kiloelectron volts) to core (megaelectron volts) energies and possible loss and acceleration mechanisms as a response to substructures (shock, sheath and ejecta, and ...

Kilpua, E.; Turner, D.; Jaynes, A.; Hietala, H.; Koskinen, H.; Osmane, A.; Palmroth, M.; Pulkkinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Baker, D.; Claudepierre, S.;

YEAR: 2019     DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026238

interplanetary coronal mass ejections; magnetospheric storm; magnetospheric waves; Outer Belt; Radiation belts; Solar wind; Van Allen Probes

The Response of Earth\textquoterights Electron Radiation Belts to Geomagnetic Storms: Statistics From the Van Allen Probes Era Including Effects From Different Storm Drivers

A statistical study was conducted of Earth\textquoterights radiation belt electron response to geomagnetic storms using NASA\textquoterights Van Allen Probes mission. Data for electrons with energies ranging from 30 keV to 6.3 MeV were included and examined as a function of L-shell, energy, and epoch time during 110 storms with SYM-H <=-50 nT during September 2012 to September 2017 (inclusive). The radiation belt response revealed clear energy and L-shell dependencies, with tens of keV electrons enhanced at all L-shells (2.5 ...

Turner, D.; Kilpua, E.; Hietala, H.; Claudepierre, S.; O\textquoterightBrien, T.; Fennell, J.; Blake, J.; Jaynes, A.; Kanekal, S.; Baker, D.; Spence, H.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G.;

YEAR: 2019     DOI: 10.1029/2018JA026066

energetic particles; Geomagnetic storms; inner magnetosphere; Radiation belts; relativistic electrons; Van Allen Probes; wave-particle interactions

2015

Pileup accident hypothesis of magnetic storm on 17 March 2015

We propose a \textquotedblleftpileup accident\textquotedblright hypothesis, based on the solar wind data analysis and magnetohydrodynamics modeling, to explain unexpectedly geoeffective solar wind structure which caused the largest magnetic storm so far during the solar cycle 24 on 17 March 2015: First, a fast coronal mass ejection with strong southward magnetic fields both in the sheath and in the ejecta was followed by a high-speed stream from a nearby coronal hole. This combination resulted in less adiabatic expansion tha ...

Kataoka, Ryuho; Shiota, Daikou; Kilpua, Emilia; Keika, Kunihiro;

YEAR: 2015     DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064816

coronal hole; coronal mass ejection; corotating interaction region; magnetic storm

The effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons in Earth\textquoterights radiation belts

We use Van Allen Probes data to investigate the responses of 10s of keV to 2 MeV electrons throughout a broad range of the radiation belts (2.5 <= L <= 6.0) during 52 geomagnetic storms from the most recent solar maximum. Electron storm-time responses are highly dependent on both electron energy and L-shell. 10s of keV electrons typically have peak fluxes in the inner belt or near-Earth plasma sheet and fill the inner magnetosphere during storm main phases. ~100 to ~600 keV electrons are enhanced in up to 87\% of cases aroun ...

Turner, D.; O\textquoterightBrien, T.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S.; Blake, J.; Kilpua, E.; Hietala, H.;

YEAR: 2015     DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064747

electrons; Van Allen Probes; Geomagnetic storms; Radiation belts

Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response

We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure ( ...

Kilpua, E.; Hietala, H.; Turner, D.; Koskinen, H.; Pulkkinen, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Reeves, G.; Claudepierre, S.; Spence, H.;

YEAR: 2015     DOI: 10.1002/2015GL063542

coronal mass ejections; Magnetic Storms; Radiation belts; solar wind storm drivers; stream interaction regions; Van Allen Probes



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