Bibliography



Found 259 entries in the Bibliography.


Showing entries from 251 through 259


2013

Evolution and slow decay of an unusual narrow ring of relativistic electrons near L ~ 3.2 following the September 2012 magnetic storm

A quantitative analysis is performed on the decay of an unusual ring of relativistic electrons between 3 and 3.5 RE, which was observed by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instrument on the Van Allen probes. The ring formed on 3 September 2012 during the main phase of a magnetic storm due to the partial depletion of the outer radiation belt for L > 3.5, and this remnant belt of relativistic electrons persisted at energies above 2 MeV, exhibiting only slow decay, until it was finally destroyed during another magneti ...

Thorne, R.; Li, W.; Ni, B.; Ma, Q.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D.; Spence, H.; Reeves, G.; Henderson, M.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Turner, D.; Angelopoulos, V.;

YEAR: 2013     DOI: 10.1002/grl.50627

RBSP; Van Allen Probes

A novel technique for rapid L* calculation: algorithm and implementation

Computing the magnetic drift invariant, L*, rapidly and accurately has always been a challenge to magnetospheric modelers, especially given the im- portance of this quantity in the radiation belt community. Min et al. (2013) proposed a new method of calculating L* using the principle of energy con- servation. Continuing with the approach outlined therein, the present pa- per focuses on the technical details of the algorithm to outline the implemen- tation, systematic analysis of accuracy, and verification of the speed of the ...

Min, Kyungguk; Bortnik, J.; Lee, Jeongwoo;

YEAR: 2013     DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50250

calculating L*; rapid L* calculation; RBSP; Van Allen Probes

A novel technique for rapid L* calculation using UBK coordinates

[1] The magnetic drift invariant (L*) is an important quantity used for tracking and organizing particle dynamics in the radiation belts, but its accurate calculation has been computationally expensive in the past, thus making it difficult to employ this quantity in real-time space weather applications. In this paper, we propose a new, efficient method to calculate L* using the principle of energy conservation. This method uses Whipple\textquoterights (U, B, K) coordinates to quickly and accurately determine trajectories of ...

Min, Kyungguk; Bortnik, J.; Lee, Jeongwoo;

YEAR: 2013     DOI: 10.1029/2012JA018177

Generalized L value; L star; RBSP; Van Allen Probes

2012

Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design

NASA\textquoterights Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA\textquoterights Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth\textquoterights environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrument ...

Kirby, Karen; Bushman, Stewart; Butler, Michael; Conde, Rich; Fretz, Kristen; Herrmann, Carl; Hill, Adrian; Maurer, Richard; Nichols, Richard; Ottman, Geffrey; Reid, Mark; Rogers, Gabe; Srinivasan, Dipak; Troll, John; Williams, Bruce;

YEAR: 2012     DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020

RBSP; Van Allen Probes

Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft and Impact of Environment on Spacecraft Design

NASA\textquoterights Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission scheduled to launch in September 2012 and is the next science mission in NASA\textquoterights Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, and the influence of the sun on the earth\textquoterights environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise the geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrument ...

Kirby, Karen; Bushman, Stewart; Butler, Michael; Conde, Rich; Fretz, Kristen; Herrmann, Carl; Hill, Adrian; Maurer, Richard; Nichols, Richard; Ottman, Geffrey; Reid, Mark; Rogers, Gabe; Srinivasan, Dipak; Troll, John; Williams, Bruce;

YEAR: 2012     DOI: 10.1109/AERO.2012.6187020

RBSP; Van Allen Probes

2009

On the loss of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous altitude: Its dependence on magnetic configurations and external conditions

[1] The present study statistically examines geosynchronous magnetic configurations and external conditions that characterize the loss of geosynchronous MeV electrons. The loss of MeV electrons often takes place during magnetospheric storms, but it also takes place without any clear storm activity. It is found that irrespective of storm activity, the day-night asymmetry of the geosynchronous H (north-south) magnetic component is pronounced during electron loss events. For the loss process, the magnitude, rather than the dura ...

Ohtani, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Singer, H.; Weygand, J.;

YEAR: 2009     DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013391

Magnetopause Losses

2007

Timescales for radiation belt electron acceleration and loss due to resonant wave-particle interactions: 1. Theory

Radiation belt electrons can interact with various modes of plasma wave in their drift orbits about the Earth, including whistler-mode chorus outside the plasmasphere, and both whistler-mode hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves inside the plasmasphere. Electrons undergo gyroresonant diffusion in their interactions with these waves. To determine the timescales for electron momentum diffusion and pitch angle diffusion, we develop bounce-averaged quasi-linear resonant diffusion coefficients for field-aligned electromagn ...

Summers, D.; Ni, Binbin; Meredith, Nigel;

YEAR: 2007     DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011801

Local Acceleration due to Wave-Particle Interaction

2006

Observation of two distinct, rapid loss mechanisms during the 20 November 2003 radiation belt dropout event

The relativistic electron dropout event on 20 November 2003 is studied using data from a number of satellites including SAMPEX, HEO, ACE, POES, and FAST. The observations suggest that the dropout may have been caused by two separate mechanisms that operate at high and low L-shells, respectively, with a separation at L \~ 5. At high L-shells (L > 5), the dropout is approximately independent of energy and consistent with losses to the magnetopause aided by the Dst effect and outward radial diffusion which can deplete relativis ...

Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R.; O\textquoterightBrien, T.; Green, J.; Strangeway, R.; . Y. Shprits, Y; Baker, D.;

YEAR: 2006     DOI: 10.1029/2006JA011802

Local Loss due to VLF/ELF/EMIC Waves

1988

Simultaneous Radial and Pitch Angle Diffusion in the Outer Electron Radiation Belt

A solution of the bimodal (radial and pitch angle) diffusion equation for the radiation belts is developed with special regard for the requirements of satellite radiation belt data analysis. In this paper, we use this solution to test the bimodal theory of outer electron belt diffusion by confronting it with satellite data. Satellite observations, usually over finite volumes of (L, t) space, are seldom sufficient in space-time duration to cover the relaxation to equilibrium of the entire radiation belt. Since time scales of ...

Chiu, Y.; Nightingale, R.; Rinaldi, M.;

YEAR: 1988     DOI: 10.1029/JA093iA04p02619

Radial Transport



  1      2      3      4      5      6